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    Contact Us

    Texas Diabetes Program - Council
    MC 1965
    PO Box 149347 Austin, Texas 78714-9347
    1100 West 49th Street
    Austin, TX 78756

    Phone: (512) 458-7490
    Fax: (512) 458-7408


    Email comments or questions

Encountering Diabetic Emergencies

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A Roll Call Video for Law Enforcement

Encountering Diabetic Emergencies Roll Call VideoOf the more than 1.4 million people in Texas with diabetes, many will experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) which can cause slurred speech, confusion, irrational behavior and dazed appearance. The symptoms of hypoglycemia can be easily mistaken for intoxication.

Untreated hypoglycemia is a medical emergency that can lead to unconsiousness, brain damage or death. A quick response is necessary to avoid complications.

That’s why the Texas Diabetes Council has created a short 4-minute roll call video, "Encountering Diabetic Emergencies," to illustrate how diabetic hypoglycemia might appear during a routine traffic stop and explain what law enforcement officers can do if they encounter someone with this medical emergency.

Police chiefs are encouraged to schedule screenings of the video during roll call. Training officers may wish to use the video as a teaching tool in emergency response classes. Individual law enforcement officers can view the video below. Regardless of where you see it, it's four minutes that can help save a life.

As a reminder of the information presented in the video, the Texas Diabetes Council provides free spiral notebooks for law enforcement with quick-reference covers describing symptoms of low blood sugar and what to do for someone with low blood sugar.

arrowHow to order "Encountering Diabetic Emergencies" and quick-reference spiral notebooks

Police chiefs, training officers, and other law enforcement personnel in Texas can receive free copies of the "Encountering Diabetic Emergencies" roll call video along with copies of the spiral notebook by agreeing to show the video during roll call, in-service trainings or other events. Simply complete the request form below and mail or fax to:

Note:  Orders can only be shipped in Texas (out-of-state orders cannot be filled)

Texas Diabetes Council, MC 1965
Texas Department of State Health Services
PO Box 149347
Austin, Texas 78714-9347
Fax: (512) 458-7408
Phone: (512) 458-7490

» Click here to download an order form (PDF, 98 kb, viewing information)

Be sure to indicate where the video will be shown and how many spiral notebooks you will need to distribute among officers attending.

arrowView the video online

Click the link below to play the video:

Encountering Diabetic Emergencies Roll Call Video (time: 3:53), 10.25 mb, viewing information)

arrowAdditional Resources

Treating Diabetes Emergencies: What Police Officers Need to Know

Treating Diabetes Emergencies:  What Police Officers Need to KnowThe American Diabetes Association (ADA) has produced a 20-minute diabetes training video for training of police officers who may encounter a person with diabetes. While "Encountering Diabetes Emergencies" deals with encountering a person with low blood sugar in a routine traffic stop, "Treating Diabetes Emergencies" addresses additional diabetes issues law enforcement may face, such as dealing with the health care needs of persons with diabetes who are detained.

» Order through the online store: http://store.diabetes.org (search for "law enforcement" or "police"), or by calling (800) ADA-ORDER (232-6733), or by e-mail at ADAOrders@pbd.com. Pay shipping only ($3).


Police Training PosterPolice training poster

“Diabetes is serious: It can be life threatening!”

Available free of charge, this poster assists law enforcement officials in identifying diabetes related symptoms and steps to take to ensure the safety of detainees with diabetes.

» Order through the online store: http://store.diabetes.org (search for "law enforcement" or "police"), or by calling (800) ADA-ORDER (232-6733), or by e-mail at ADAOrders@pbd.com. Pay shipping only.

External links to other sites are intended to be informational and do not have the endorsement of the Texas Department of State Health Services. These sites may also not be accessible to persons with disabilities.

Last updated March 11, 2013