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    The Environmental Lead Program (ELP) is within the
    Division for Regulatory Services
    P. O. Box 149347
    Austin, TX 787143947
    (512) 834-6770 


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    External links to other sites are intended to be informational and do not have the endorsement of the Texas Department of State Health Services. These sites may also not be accessible to people with disabilities.


RULES FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

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Environmental Lead Program


  1. Where can I get a copy of the Lead Rules?
  2. How can I access the federal guidance documents listed in Section 295 .203 of the Lead Rules?
  3. What Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) rules and laws regulate lead?
  4. What do the DSHS Lead Rules require?
  5. What type of structures do the Lead Rules cover?
  6. How do I become certified as a lead inspector, risk assessor, project designer, supervisor, worker, or firm?
  7. Does DSHS certify laboratories and how can I obtain a list of certified labs?
  8. Where can I get information on lead in mini-blinds or lead in candy wrappers?
  9. To whom can I speak about lead in water?
  10. Where can I go for help concerning lead waste disposal?

1. Where can I get a copy of the Lead Rules?

To receive a copy of the Texas Environmental Lead Reduction Rules, go the to Rules page on this site, or call the DSHS at (512) 834-6787, ext. 2434, or (888) 778-9440 (toll-free in Texas).

2. How can I access the federal guidance documents listed in Section 295.203 of the Lead Rules?

These documents are available for review at the DSHS, Headquarters Annex, located at 8407 Wall Street, Austin, Texas; any of the DSHS main regional offices; and any DSHS-accredited training provider. Copies also may be obtained by contacting the National Lead Information Center at (800) 424-LEAD (5323).

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3. What Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) rules and laws regulate lead?

In order to help reduce exposures to lead, the Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill 544 (SB 544) in June of 1995, to ensure that individuals conducting lead-based paint abatements and removals in residential homes and multifamily dwellings are properly trained and certified by the state. As required by this legislation, DSHS has promulgated the Texas Environmental Lead Reduction Rules 25 TAC 295.201-220, which became effective on February 19, 1996. The rules were amended effective May 10, 1998 to include child-occupied facilities such as day cares and preschools, required by House Bill 729 (HB 729) passed by the 75th Legislature, 1997. The rules were amended again effective March 23, 2003, to align state rules with federal rules established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concerning lead hazard standards. On January 1, 2005, the rules were amended to accommodate the changes required by House Bill 2292, 78th Legislature, 2003, which revised Texas Health and Safety Code (HSC), §§12.0111 and 12.0112, to require two-year licenses effective January 1, 2005; and Senate Bill 1152, 78th Legislature, 2003, which amended Government Code (GC), Chapter 2054, regarding the TexasOnline Authority. These statutes required that two-year certifications and training accreditations (instead of 3-year terms) start being issued to new applicants and existing three-year certifications, and training accreditations had to be converted to two-year terms upon renewal. Language was also added that allows for the collection of annual subscription and convenience fees to recover costs associated with processing fee payments for applications through TexasOnline, a web-based online payment system.

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4. What do the DSHS Lead Rules require?

The rules require that persons performing lead-based paint activities such as inspection, risk assessment, project design, or abatement in target housing (which includes most single and multifamily dwellings constructed prior to 1978), and child-occupied facilities (also built before 1978), must be certified by the DSHS after receiving training. Homeowners of target housing who are considering having any of these lead-based paint activities conducted should ask to see the DSHS-issued certification identification (ID) card of any of the persons that they hire.  If lead-based paint in target housing is to be abated, the certified firm must submit an abatement notification form to the DSHS prior to the beginning of the job, and a fee will be assessed after receipt of the notification by DSHS.

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5. What type of structures do the Lead Rules cover?

The DSHS Lead Rules apply to target housing (constructed prior to 1978), which may include single and multi-family residences, and apartment buildings, and child-occupied facilities (also built before 1978), such as preschools, kindergartens, and daycares. The rules DO NOT cover non-residential public and commercial buildings, industrial facilities, bridges, roads, or steel structures or zero-bedroom dwellings such as efficiencies, studio apartments, dormitory housing, military barracks, and rentals of individual rooms in residential dwellings.

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6. How do I become certified as a lead inspector, risk assessor, project designer, supervisor, worker, or firm?

To become certified in one of the above-mentioned lead disciplines (excluding lead firm), one must first be trained in that discipline by a DSHS-accredited Lead Training Program Provider, take and pass the appropriate exam, if applicable (required for Lead Inspector, Lead Risk Assessor, and Lead Abatement Supervisor), meet the education/experience requirements as appropriate, and then submit a certification application and appropriate fee to the DSHS.  You can download the appropriate application for a certification discipline from this website or call DSHS at (512) 834-6600, ext. 2174; or toll-free (800) 572-5548, ext. 2174, to request an application.

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7. Does DSHS certify laboratories and how can I obtain a list of certified labs?

DSHS does not certify laboratories, but an EPA-recognized lab must be utilized to analyze any lead samples collected in conjunction with a lead inspection, lead risk assessment, or lead abatement.  To inquire about EPA-recognized laboratories, call the National Lead Information Center toll-free at (800) 424-LEAD (5323) or click here to view current the list of EPA-recognized laboratories.

8. Where can I get information on lead in mini-blinds or lead in candy wrappers?

You can call the DSHS, Policy, Standards, and Quality Assurance Unit (PSQA), Environmental Health Group, at (512) 834-6787, ext. 2301 or (888) 778-9440 (toll-free in Texas), ext. 2301.

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9. To whom can I speak about lead in water?

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) will be able to assist you with questions about lead in water by calling the Water Supply Division at (512) 239-4691, or by calling any of the TCEQ Regional Offices.

10. Where can I go for help concerning lead waste disposal?

The TCEQ will be able to assist you with questions about lead waste disposal by calling the Industrial Hazardous Waste program at (512) 239-6413 or by calling any of the TCEQ Regional Offices.

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Texas Department of State Health Services - Division for Regulatory Services -
P. O. Box 149347 - Austin, Texas 78714-9347 - (512) 834-6770
Last updated July 22, 2010