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    Contact Us

    Environmental and Injury Epidemiology and Toxicology Unit

    1100 West 49th Street
    Austin, TX 78756

    Phone: 1-800-588-1248
    Fax: 512-776-7222


    Email any comments, questions, complaints, or feedback

The Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology Program (EOEP)

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MISSION:

Our mission is to use the principles of epidemiology and toxicology to: reduce the incidence and severity of injuries; understand and prevent adverse human health conditions due to toxic exposures; identify human populations at risk, and promote and assist in identifying evidence-based actions to protect and promote the health of the people of Texas.


About EOEP

The Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology Program's (EOEP) focus is on the investigation and prevention of diseases and adverse health conditions related to environmental and occupational exposures. The EOEP conducts surveillance for selected diseases and occupational conditions; investigations of non-communicable disease clusters; worksite investigations; epidemiological studies of non-communicable diseases and health conditions; and provides education and consultation regarding harmful environmental and occupational exposures.

The Texas Occupational Conditions Reporting Act was passed by the 69th Legislature in 1985. This act requires the reporting of four occupational conditions to the Texas Department of State Health Services. The four conditions are: adult elevated blood lead levels, acute occupational pesticide poisoning, silicosis, and asbestosis. The act also gave the Texas Board of Health the authority to add other preventable occupational conditions to the list. Since 1987, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has provided limited funding for occupational disease surveillance activity in Texas.

In 1995, the 74th Legislature passed legislation that allowed the Texas Board of Health to establish rules for reporting lead poisoning and establish a registry of children with lead poisoning and blood lead levels of concern. The recommended lead screening guidelines for children in Texas beginning January 2001 are that all children will receive a blood lead test at 12 and 24 months and all blood lead results will be reported to the Texas Department of State Health Services.


*External links to other sites are intended to be informational and do not have the endorsement of the Texas Department of State Health Services. These sites may also not be accessible to people with disabilities.*

Last updated February 05, 2013