Funding Alert Vol. 24 No. 2 Alert # 1 - February 5, 2013

Loading...

Texas Department of State Health Services icon Funding Information Center icon Toll free: 1-888-963-7111 ext. 7684 icon Austin phone: (512) 776-7684 icon Fax: (512) 776-7683


The Texas Department of State Health Services Funding Alert is published weekly.  If you wish to subscribe to the Funding Information Center Funding Alert and other services, please call (512) 776-7684 or fill out our online subscription form which can be found at: https://www.dshs.state.tx.us/fic/subscribe.aspx.  Information in the Funding Alert is not copyrighted and may be reproduced. The Texas Department of State Health Services Funding Information Center would appreciate credit for the material used and a copy of the reprint. For information on viewing Adobe Acrobat .pdf and other files, see file viewing information.

Disclaimer: External links to other sites are intended to be informational and do not have the endorsement of the Department of State Health Services. These sites may also not be accessible to persons with disabilities. External e-mail links are provided to you as a courtesy. Please be advised that you are not e-mailing the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) and DSHS policies do not apply should you choose to correspond.


Funding News and Grant Tips

'Don’t Call Us, We’ll Call You'
By Brad Smith, president of the Foundation Center
Okay. You're working at a great nonprofit, you've got a wonderful idea that's going to change the world, and all you need is a grant to get you started. Guess what? The majority of America's foundations don't want you to send in a proposal.
Of the more than 86,000 independent, community, and corporate foundations in the United States, 60 percent state that they do not accept unsolicited proposals. Together they represent 32 percent of total assets and 34 percent of annual giving. Nearly $16 billion of the $46 billion distributed every year is not up for grabs; you need an invitation.
Foundations in America are private institutions and have the right to decide how, when, and on what terms they will accept proposals and make their grants. At the Foundation Center, we respect that right and clearly indicate in our databases when a particular foundation does not want to receive unsolicited proposals. But people seeking foundation grants find this more than a bit frustrating. One of their most common questions is, "Why won't foundation X let me send in my proposal?"
There are at least two reasons. The first is foundation size. Dealing responsibly with requests for funding requires significant effort, time, and people. Yet in one Foundation Center survey of 11,000 foundations, 76 percent of respondents had fewer than four staff. Foundations are frequently inundated with proposals. My own experience working in philanthropy has taught me that for every grant approved by a foundation, eleven more are declined. The ratio can be much worse. One year at the Ford Foundation -- which accepts unsolicited proposals and has hundreds of staff -- we decided to count every letter of inquiry, e-mail, and actual proposal and came up with something on the order of 144,000. The number of grants actually made that year? Fewer than 3,000. The situation could be helped if foundations were clearer about their grantmaking priorities and nonprofits were more careful in targeting their proposals, but the reality is one of greater demand than supply. From a foundation's perspective, not accepting proposals can be like building a dyke to hold back the flood.
The second reason has to do with the growing emphasis in philanthropy on strategy and social impact. Foundations may command billions of dollars, but the challenges they aspire to address -- educational quality, access to health care, workforce and economic development, climate change, and more -- require far greater resources. Moreover, in recent years a new wave of business-oriented, often younger philanthropists have entered the field and brought with them notions of social investment, metrics, and assessment. All this adds up to a trend among some foundations to design their own theories of change and strategies and then either implement programs themselves or select the organizations from which they are willing to entertain proposals. The actual design of these strategies frequently is done in collaboration with nonprofits and universities, so if you happen to be part of the process, you'll most likely get a grant. If not, well, you're just not part of the in-crowd.
In 2009, with the economy in the tank, I was doing a live chat with the Chronicle of Philanthropy and someone asked whether they should still try when a foundation said it didn't accept unsolicited proposals. My answer was not "no," but rather that they should pay attention to what the foundation is saying and try to find someone who knows a board member, a staff person, or any other connection that would help get them in the door. In our grantseeking classes here at the center, we always teach that a grant begins with a relationship. That's true whether a foundation accepts unsolicited proposals or not.
Lately, I've seen some slightly less foreboding language crop up on a number of foundation Web sites: "The foundation does not encourage unsolicited proposals." Maybe that's the solution for smaller foundations not wanting to be overwhelmed and larger, highly strategic foundations striving to maximize their impact. Foundations receive a tax exemption on their investment income in exchange for contributing to the public good. One way to do that is to maintain at least a single program area, however small, that invites the public, in the form of nonprofits, to freely apply for grants. Besides, no matter how knowledgeable a donor, staff, and consultant might be, the next big idea out there may be the one that literally comes in over the transom.
From PhilanTopic, a blog of opinion and commentary from the Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest e-mail, 1/31/12icon

Let's Think Smarter About the Charitable Tax Deduction
By Jan Masaoka, chief executive officer of the California Association of Nonprofits (CalNonprofits)
On New Year's Day, lawmakers in Washington finally agreed to disagree and passed a bill to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. But with the federal government looking at another trillion-dollar deficit and record levels of debt, no idea for balancing federal expenditures and revenue will be off the table for long.
For many nonprofits, keeping the charitable tax deduction off the table is the issue. But while the issue itself may seem straightforward, there are more nuances and choices to it than meet the eye. There are many ways, for example, to increase taxes that would not have a directly negative impact on nonprofits -- which, after all, are a huge part of the safety net for the poor, the elderly, the unemployed, and many others.
The deal made to avoid the fiscal cliff left the charitable tax deduction untouched for the most part -- and for the time being. To be clear: neither eliminating the deduction nor reducing the deductibility rate was discussed; the administration's proposal would have lowered the current cap on the deductibility of charitable gifts from 35 percent to 28 percent of one's income. The one tiny change passed was the reinstatement of the Clinton-era Pease Amendment, which will raise taxes on some of the wealthiest donors by perhaps $2,000 each.
However, the intensity of the debate served to highlight some thought-provoking issues for those of us in the nonprofit and philanthropic communities, especially as the potential for revisiting the charitable deduction (and other tax breaks) looms large.
Some nonprofits are conflicted about the charitable deduction: on the one hand, nonprofits benefit from donations that often are influenced by their tax-deductible status; on the other, many of these same nonprofits support higher taxes for the wealthiest in our society. Indeed, a reduction in the charitable deduction does two contradictory things for nonprofits: it reduces the financial incentive for people to give, and it also brings in more tax revenue -- revenue that could be used to fund nonprofit services.
Of note, the current deduction formula affords greater tax relief to higher-income individuals than to lower-income individuals, for three reasons:
* Higher-income individuals are more likely to itemize;
* Because it's applied to taxable income, the deduction helps higher-income individuals more since their marginal tax rates are higher; and
* The cap only affects individuals who donate a third or more of their taxable income. (Lower-income individuals are unlikely to be able to give away such a large percentage of their income.)
Other proposals, such as establishing a "floor" for the charitable deduction (a minimum percentage of adjusted gross income by which charitable contributions could qualify for deduction), could be more equitable and arguably could raise more tax revenue while having little or no impact on charitable giving. We should also look at ideas for extending the charitable tax deduction to non-itemizers, changing the formulas on deductions for donated stock, and making the estate tax more of an incentive for bequests.
All of us at the California Association of Nonprofits encourage our colleagues in the nonprofit sector to advance the longer-term conversation about the charitable deduction as it relates to the balance between sector sustainability, equitable taxation, and fiscal responsibility.
But while we all must work to protect the deduction, we cannot allow the main message from the nonprofit sector to be only about tax breaks. We feel strongly that the Bush tax cuts of 2001 and 2003 have been harmful to our economy and our communities, while benefiting very few Americans. In the fiscal cliff deal, current marginal tax rates were extended indefinitely for individuals earning less than $400,000 and couples earning less than $450,000 -- approximately 98 percent of all U.S. taxpayers. While the revenue that will be realized by raising rates on the highest-earning 2 percent of taxpayers is less than what President Obama originally proposed, it's a step in the right direction for equitably increasing tax revenue as part of a longer process to bring the federal budget into balance.
We believe the responsible position is to support the charitable deduction and to support policies that result in increased revenue. In order to do that, we all will need to consider additional options as a new Congress begins to craft policy around these important issues.
From PhilanTopic, a blog of opinion and commentary from the Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest e-mail, 1/31/12icon


Public Funding Opportunities

Clinical Sites for an Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN) (U01): RFA-RM-13-004
SOURCE: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund initiative
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 5/17/13. Application: 6/19/13 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.
$ AVAILABLE: The total amount of funds available for this award is approximately $4.8 million for FY2014 contingent upon receiving scientifically meritorious applications. Five to seven awards are anticipated from the solicitation.
ELIGIBILITY: Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education, nonprofits with and without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education), small businesses, for-profit organizations (other than small businesses), state governments, U.S. territories or possessions, Indian/Native American tribal government (federally recognized and other than federally recognized), Indian/Native American tribally designated organizations, non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities, Hispanic-serving institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs), Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions, regional organizations, eligible agencies of the federal government, and faith-based or community-based organizations.
PURPOSE: To establish Clinical Sites for an Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN) added to and building upon the NIH Intramural Research Program’s Undiagnosed Diseases Program (IRP-UDP).
CFDA: 93.310
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-RM-13-004.html
From NIH Web site, accessed 2/1/13icon
Subject(s) medical research

Competitive Request for Proposal - Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response - Hospital Preparedness Program: #: CPS/HOSP-0543.1
SOURCE: Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 3/4/13.
$ AVAILABLE: Approximately $13 million is expected to be available to fund the Texas Hospital Preparedness Program (HPP) and the Healthcare Preparedness Capabilities designed to facilitate and guide healthcare system preparedness planning and ultimately assure safer, more resilient, and better-prepared communities.
ELIGIBILITY: Eligible respondents include governmental, non-governmental, not-for-profit organizations, for-profit entities, associations, public and or private entities, located within the state of Texas. Individuals are not eligible to apply.
PURPOSE: The Department of State Health Services (DSHS or Department) announces the expected availability of federal funds from the Assistant Secretary of Preparedness and Response (ASPR) to provide support and resources for regional healthcare systems/organizations in demonstrating measureable and sustainable progress toward achieving the healthcare preparedness capabilities that promote prepared and resilient communities.
CFDA: none
CONTACT: Donna Ockletree, (512) 776-7470, e-mail: Donna.Ockletree@dshs.state.tx.us. For more information see http://esbd.cpa.state.tx.us/bid_show.cfm?bidid=103875
From Client Services Contracting Unit e-mail, 1/25/13icon
Subject(s) emergency medicine, health care facilities, biodefense/bioterrorism

Core Centers for Musculoskeletal Biology and Medicine (P30): RFA-AR-14-002
SOURCE: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 5/31/13. Application: 7/1/13.
$ AVAILABLE: The NIAMS intends to fund up to an estimated three to four awards, corresponding to a total of $1.6 million in direct costs in FY 2014. The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations, and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. Future year amounts will depend on annual appropriations.
ELIGIBILITY: Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education, nonprofits with and without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education), small businesses, for-profit organizations (other than small businesses), state governments, U.S. territories or possessions, Indian/Native American tribal government (federally recognized and other than federally recognized), Indian/Native American tribally designated organizations, non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities, Hispanic-serving institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs), Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions, regional organizations, eligible agencies of the federal government, and faith-based or community-based organizations.
PURPOSE: The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) invites applications for Research Core Centers (P30s) in musculoskeletal biology and medicine. The Core Centers for Musculoskeletal Biology and Medicine (CCMBM) will provide shared facilities and services to groups of established, currently funded investigators addressing scientific problems in musculoskeletal biology and medicine, in order to improve efficiency, accelerate the pace of research, and ensure greater productivity.
CFDA: 93.846
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AR-14-002.html
From NIH Web site, accessed 2/1/13icon
Subject(s) medical research

Prevention and Health Promotion Interventions to Prevent Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Associated Physical and Psychological Health Problems in U.S. Military Personnel, Veterans and their Families (R01): RFA-DA-13-012
SOURCE: National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs (OASD/HA)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 4/1/13. Application: 5/1/13 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.
$ AVAILABLE: For this announcement combined with the parallel R34 (RFA-DA-13-013), the participating organizations intend to commit approximately $7.5 million (total costs) in Fiscal Year 2013 with which it is expected that nine to 18 new grants will be funded across the two announcements. Specifically, in Fiscal Year 2013, NIDA intends to commit approximately $1.0 million (total costs), DoD intends to commit $5-10 million (total costs), and NIAAA intends to commit approximately $1.0 million (total costs).
ELIGIBILITY: Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education, nonprofits with and without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education), small businesses, for-profit organizations (other than small businesses), state governments, U.S. territories or possessions, Indian/Native American tribal government (federally recognized and other than federally recognized), Indian/Native American tribally designated organizations, non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities, Hispanic-serving institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs), Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions, regional organizations, eligible agencies of the federal government, and faith-based or community-based organizations.
PURPOSE: The purpose is to accelerate research on health promotion and prevention interventions with foci on reducing the onset and progression of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use and abuse (including illicit and prescription drugs) and associated mental and physical health problems and on the promotion of health-enhancing behaviors among active-duty or recently separated (e.g., Iraq and Afghanistan) military troops, veterans, and their families.
CFDA: 93.279, 93.273, 93.865
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-13-012.html
From NIH Web site, accessed 2/1/13icon
Subject(s) substance abuse education/prevention, substance abuse research, smoking/tobacco, health promotion/wellness

Prevention and Health Promotion Interventions to Prevent Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Associated Physical and Psychological Health Problems in U.S. Military Personnel, Veterans and their Families (R34): RFA-DA-13-013
SOURCE: National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs (OASD/HA)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 4/1/13. Application: 5/1/13 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.
$ AVAILABLE: For this announcement combined with the parallel R34 (RFA-DA-13-013), the participating organizations intend to commit approximately $7.5 million (total costs) in Fiscal Year 2013 with which it is expected that nine to 18 new grants will be funded across the two announcements. Specifically, in Fiscal Year 2013, NIDA intends to commit approximately $1.0 million (total costs), DoD intends to commit $5-10 million (total costs), and NIAAA intends to commit approximately $1.0 million (total costs).
ELIGIBILITY: Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education, nonprofits with and without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education), small businesses, for-profit organizations (other than small businesses), state governments, U.S. territories or possessions, Indian/Native American tribal government (federally recognized and other than federally recognized), Indian/Native American tribally designated organizations, non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities, Hispanic-serving institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs), Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions, regional organizations, eligible agencies of the federal government, and faith-based or community-based organizations.
PURPOSE: The purpose is to accelerate research on health promotion and prevention interventions with foci on reducing the onset and progression of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use and abuse (including illicit and prescription drugs) and associated mental and physical health problems and on the promotion of health-enhancing behaviors among active-duty or recently separated (e.g., Iraq and Afghanistan) military troops, Veterans, and their families.
CFDA: 93.279, 93.273, 93.865
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-13-013.html
From NIH Web site, accessed 2/1/13icon
Subject(s) substance abuse education/prevention, substance abuse research, smoking/tobacco, health promotion/wellness

Skin Diseases Research Core Centers (P30): RFA-AR-14-001
SOURCE: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: 8/20/13. Application: 9/20/13.
$ AVAILABLE: NIAMS intends to fund an estimate of four awards, corresponding to a total of $1.6 million in direct costs in FY 2014. The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations, and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications. Future year amounts will depend on annual appropriations.
ELIGIBILITY: Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education, nonprofits with and without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education), small businesses, for-profit organizations (other than small businesses), state governments, U.S. territories or possessions, Indian/Native American tribal government (federally recognized and other than federally recognized), Indian/Native American tribally designated organizations, non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities, Hispanic-serving institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs), Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions, regional organizations, eligible agencies of the federal government, and faith-based or community-based organizations.
PURPOSE: The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) invites applications for Research Core Centers (P30s) in skin biology and diseases. The Skin Diseases Research Core Centers (SDRCs) will provide shared facilities and services to groups of established, currently funded investigators addressing scientific problems in skin biology and diseases, in order to improve efficiency, accelerate the pace of research, and ensure greater productivity.
CFDA: 93.846
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AR-14-001.html
From NIH Web site, accessed 2/1/13icon
Subject(s) medical research

Small Rural Hospital Improvement Grant Program (SHIP): HRSA-13-163
SOURCE: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 3/15/13.
$ AVAILABLE: $15 million for 47 awards.
ELIGIBILITY: The State Office of Rural Health (SORH) in each state will be the official grantee and will act as a fiscal intermediary for all hospitals within their state. This is a new and competing continuation announcement. Eligible applicants include current SORHs receiving SHIP, as well as SORHs not previously funded who meet eligibility requirements.
PURPOSE: The purpose of the Small Rural Hospital Improvement Grant Program (SHIP) is to help small rural hospitals of 49 beds or less, and do any or all of the following: 1) enable the purchase of equipment and/or training to help hospitals attain value-based purchasing provision in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), 2) aid small rural hospitals in joining or becoming accountable care organizations, or create shared savings programs per the ACA, and 3) enable small rural hospitals to purchase health information technology, equipment and/or training to comply with meaningful use, ICD-10 standards, and payment bundling.
CFDA: 93.301
CONTACT: David Dietz, (301) 443-4081, e-mail: Ddietz@hrsa.gov. For more information see https://grants3.hrsa.gov/2010/Web2External/Interface/FundingCycle/ExternalView.aspx?&fCycleID=ee1b1fa7-c0cd-40a2-aef1-016994d1c5ca&txtAction=View+Details&submitAction=Go&ViewMode=EU
From HRSA web site, accessed 1/30/13icon
Subject(s) health care facilities, rural health


Private Funding Opportunities

Academy of General Dentistry Foundation Grant Program
SOURCE: Academy of General Dentistry Foundation (AGD)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 10/31/13.
$ AVAILABLE: Award Ceiling: $5,000.
ELIGIBILITY: Nonprofit organizations that have a 501(c)(3) status and are dedicated to dentistry through either professional or public initiatives are eligible to apply.
PURPOSE: The AGD Foundation supports general dentists and dental personnel programs that offer access to quality oral health care outreach for underserved populations.
CONTACT: For questions send an e-mail to: foundation@agd.org. For more information see http://www.agd.org/
From Rural Assistance Center Health Update e-mail, 1/31/13icon
Subject(s) dental health, underserved populations

Connections for Cardiovascular Health Program
SOURCE: AstraZeneca HealthCare Foundation
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 2/28/13.
$ AVAILABLE: The program awards grants of $150,000. In 2012, the foundation awarded more than $4.4 million in grants to 22 organizations.
ELIGIBILITY: To be eligible for a grant, applicants must be U.S.-based nonprofit organizations engaged in charitable work that addresses cardiovascular health issues within the U.S. and its territories; recognize and work to address an unmet need related to cardiovascular health in the community; respond to the urgency around addressing cardiovascular health issues, including cardiovascular disease or conditions contributing to cardiovascular disease; and improve the quality of patients' and non-professional caregivers' lives in connection with the services provided and work done.
PURPOSE: The AstraZeneca HealthCare Foundation has announced that it is accepting applications for the 2013 Connections for Cardiovascular Health grant program, which supports nonprofit organizations engaged in charitable work at the community level in support of the foundation's mission to improve cardiovascular health in the United States.
Grant applications that describe innovative initiatives with clearly defined outcomes and measurable results and processes will be considered for funding. Applicants must demonstrate sustainability plans for the program to continue its work to improve cardiovascular health after the foundation grant funds are expended.
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see http://www.astrazeneca-us.com/responsibility/astrazeneca-healthcare-foundation
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest RFP Bulletin e-mail, 1/25/13icon
Subject(s) cardiovascular/heart disease


Events

Successful Grants Write Now
SPONSOR: Greenlights for Nonprofit Success
WHEN: February 14, 8:30 am to noon.
WHERE: Greenlights for Nonprofit Success, 7703 North Lamar Blvd., Suite 400, (Austin, TX).
DESCRIPTION: Jump-start your grant writing with three dynamic workshops that can strengthen your skills as an emerging grant writer or development manager of your nonprofit organization. What does it take to become a grant writer? This workshop in the three part grantsmanship series will provide you with all the basics you need in prospecting for potential funders, preparing a powerful case statement, developing grant budgets and more. Learn what funders are looking for in your solicitations and how to create grants that stand out in a crowd.
COST: $55 Greenlights members / $95 non-members.
CONTACT: Alanna Fraase, (512) 477-5955 ext. 252, e-mail: alannaf@greenlights.org.
From Greenlights for Nonprofit Success Web site, accessed 1/30/13icon

Board Leaders Forum
SPONSOR: Greenlights for Nonprofit Success
WHEN: February 20, 5:30 to 7 pm.
WHERE: The Driskill Hotel, 604 Brazos St. (Austin, TX).
DESCRIPTION: The Board Leaders Forum is a unique networking and learning event designed especially for nonprofit board members and the executive leaders who work with them.
Board Leaders Forum gives Central Texas board leaders the opportunity to learn about governance from experts in the field and to meet with other community leaders to share new and innovative strategies for excellent board service.
In addition to networking, you will learn from three experienced board and community leaders, who will share their perspective and ideas in an interactive panel discussion, moderated by Matt Kouri, Greenlights' president & executive director:
* Manuel Azuara, principal, Bridgepoint Consulting.
* Earl Maxwell, CEO, St. David's Foundation.
* Jeanie Wyatt, CFA, CEO & CIO, South Texas Money Management, Ltd.
COST: $20 Greenlights members / $30 non-members.
CONTACT: Alanna Fraase, (512) 477-5955 ext. 252, e-mail: alannaf@greenlights.org.
From Greenlights for Nonprofit Success Web site, accessed 1/30/13icon

All About Grants: Two-Day Institute
SPONSOR: Texas Center for Grants Development (TGCD)
WHEN: June 5-6, 8 am to 4 pm.
WHERE: Harris County Department of Education, 6300 Irvington Blvd., (Houston, TX).
DESCRIPTION: Topics in the workshop:
Day One
June 5, 2013 - 8:00 am - 4:00 pm
* Grant Writing Basics
* Data Every Grant Writer Should Know
* Essential Tools for Program Planning
Day Two
June 6, 2013 - 8:30 am - 4:00 pm
* Budget Planning
* Funding Resources are Everywhere
* Writing Composition and Its Process
* Team Approach to Grant Writing
* Reflections
You will discover:
* How to decipher funding guidelines and other requirements.
* Local statistics that every grant writer should know and where to locate local statistics fast.
* Tools for program design that funders require.
* Hot topics that are gaining momentum to receive discretionary funding from public agencies.
* New funding resources and how to improve your organization’s capacity statement to gain attention from potential funders.
* Fundamentals of writing specifically for grants.
* How to develop a grant proposal using a team approach.
COST: $300 registration received before May 3. $350 registration received after May 3.
CONTACT: Gayla Rawlinson, (713) 696-8293, e-mail: grawlinson@hcde-texas.org.
From Texas Center for Grants Development (TGCD) e-mail, 1/29/13icon

Summer Institutes on Evidence-Based Quality Improvement
SPONSOR: The Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice, Improvement Science Research Network, the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio
WHEN: July 9-13.
WHERE: Grand Hyatt Riverwalk, (San Antonio, TX).
DESCRIPTION: At the Summer Institutes, you will build scientific capacity and apply evidence to improve care and patient outcomes.
Experience a full immersion in the latest advances in healthcare improvement. Take advantage of back-to-back institutes to improve care and patient outcomes, from research to implementation to outcomes.
Abstracts are being accepted for the Summer Institutes until March 4, 2013. Clinicians, Educators and Researchers share your EBP successes. Nurses, physicians, pharmacists, managers, and health professionals are invited to submit for consideration, abstracts consistent with the theme of these national, interdisciplinary conferences.
CONTACT: Kandice Hall, (210) 567-1486, e-mail: HallKM@uthscsa.edu.
From The Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice e-mail, 1/28/13icon


returnReturn to Alert

  • Loading...
Last updated June 17, 2014