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    Grand Rounds contact:
    grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


    Continuing Education contact:
    ce.service@dshs.state.tx.us


    TRAIN Texas contact:
    txtrain@dshs.state.tx.us

Presentations - Fall 2013

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Presentations
Fall 2013 Schedule

Fall 2013 Semester

The Fall 2013 semester of Grand Rounds started on October 9 and ended on November 20. All presentations were on Wednesdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Central Time in Austin (K-100 Lecture Hall at 1100 W. 49th Street, see map) or via webinar.

Please note: CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.

Questions? E-mail grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


October 9, 2013, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar
Penticuff
Joy Hinson Penticuff, PhD, RN, Concordia University, Retired

10-9-13 Ethical Issues in Giving Bad News

Ethical Issues in Giving Bad News 
TRAIN Course ID:
1046668
Presenter: Joy Hinson Penticuff, PhD, RN, Concordia University, Retired
Description: Breaking bad news is among the most difficult things a professional has to do. Delivering bad news thoughtfully enhances trust in relationships and is ethically appropriate. While everyone faces situations that include breaking bad news, few of us have had any formal training on the subject. Skill is required to ensure that bad news is delivered humanely and effectively. Please join Joy Penticuff, PhD, RN to learn about the science of delivering bad news, including ethical implications, steps in effective delivery, protocols for work settings, and outcomes.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, LPC, LMFT, and certificate of attendance. This presentation will offer 1.5 of ethics credit for physicians, social workers, licensed professional counselors, and licensed marriage and family therapists.
Presentation documents:

  • Slides (.pdf)
  • Handout (.pdf)
  • Webinar recording - To request a copy of the recording on CD-ROM, contact the DSHS Audiovisual Library at avlibrary@dshs.state.tx.us. CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles not available below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. The Bureau of National Affairs, Inc. Breaking bad news to management can be challenging for HR. HR Focus. 2013;90(9):3-6.
  2. Burgers C, Beukeboom CJ, Sparks L. How the doc should (not) talk: when breaking bad news with negations influences patients' immediate responses and medical adherence
    intentions. Patient Educ Couns. 2012;89(2):267-73.
  3. Davenport L, Schopp G. Breaking bad news: communication skills for difficult conversations. JAAPA. 2011;24(2):46-50.
  4. Marquez, J. Breaking the bad news on 401(k)s. Workforce Management. 2009;88(7):30-32.
  5. Martins RG, Carvalho IP. Breaking bad news: patients' preferences and health locus of control. Patient Educ Couns. 2013;92(1):67-73.
  6. Phillips, R. Florida to exhume bodies buried at former boys school. CNN. Updated September 2, 2013.
  7. Redding, W. Breaking bad finance news. Associations Now. 2010;6(7):47-50.
  8. Stengle, J. Measles cases put North Texas church’s teachings under scrutiny. Austin American-Statesman. August 31, 2013.
  9. Tuffrey-Wijne I. A new model for breaking bad news to people with intellectual disabilities. Palliat Med. 2013;27 (1):5-12.

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October 23, 2013, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar
Shine
Ken Shine, MD, Executive Vice Chancellor, Univ. of Texas System, Past President of the Institute of Medicine

10-23-13 Lessons Learned from a Lifetime of Quality Improvement

Lessons Learned from a Lifetime of Quality Improvement 
TRAIN Course ID:
104668
Presenter: Ken Shine, MD, Executive Vice Chancellor (retired), University of Texas System, Past President of the Institute of Medicine
Description: Kenneth Shine, MD, University of Texas System’s Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, and nationally recognized champion for quality improvement in health care will be presenting “Lessons Learned from a Lifetime of Quality Improvement”. As former president of the Institute of Medicine, a non-profit, non-partisan organization, Dr. Shine has been instrumental in influencing national health care policy. Perhaps the most controversial issue Dr. Shine confronted as president of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences was the quality of healthcare in America, which led to landmark reports, including: To Err Is Human-Building a Better Healthcare System and Crossing the Quality Chasm – A New Health System for the 21st Century. These reports found that medical errors were causing tens of thousands of deaths annually and became a powerful impetus for sweeping changes. Please join Dr. Shine for this intriguing discussion and highlight of DSHS’s recognition of National Healthcare Quality Week (October 20-26, 2013).
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, LPC, LMFT, and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

  • Slides (.pdf)
  • Handout (.pdf)
  • Webinar recording - To request a copy of the recording on CD-ROM, contact the DSHS Audiovisual Library at avlibrary@dshs.state.tx.us. CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles not available below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Baker GR. The challenges of making care safer: leadership and system transformation. Healthc Q. 2012;15:8-11.
  2. Dilley, JA, Bekemeier, B, Harris, JR. Quality improvement interventions in public ealth systems: a systematic review. Am J Prev Med. 2012;42 (suppl):S58-S71.
  3. Ebrahimi, M, Sadeghi, M. Quality management and performance: an annotated review. Int J Prod Res. 2013,51(18):5625-5643.
  4. Joly, BM, Booth, M, Mittal, P, Shaler, G. Measuring quality improvement in public health: the development and psychometric testing of a QI maturity tool. Eval Health Prof. 2012;35(2):119-147.
  5. Perla, RJ, Provost, LP, Parry, GJ. Seven propositions of the science of improvement: exploring foundations. Q Manage Health Care. 2013;22(3):170-186.
  6. Riley, WR, Parsons, H, McCoy, K. Introducing quality improvement methods into local public health departments: structured evaluation of a statewide pilot project. Health Serv Res. 2009;44(5, pt 2):1863-1879.
  7. Wiengarten, F, Fynes, B, Cheng, E, Chavez, R. Taking an innovative approach to quality practices: exploring the importance of a company’s innovativeness on the success of TQM practices. Int J Prod Res. 2013;51(10):3055-3074.  

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October 30, 2013, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Jackson
Anna Jackson, Deputy Director, Via Hope, Univ. of Texas at Austin

Grieder
Diane Grieder, MEd, CEO, AliPar, Inc.

Abzug
Tracy Abzug, LCSW, Recovery Program Manager, Austin State Hospital

10-30-13 Person Centered Recovery Planning

Person Centered Recovery Planning
TRAIN Course ID:
1046669
Presenters: Anna Jackson, Deputy Director, Via Hope, Univ. of Texas at Austin; Diane Grieder, MEd, CEO, AliPar, Inc.; Tracy Abzug, LCSW, Recovery Program Manager, Austin State Hospital 
Description: Person Centered Recovery Planning (PCRP) emphasizes self-determination, empowerment, personal choice, individual strengths, and partnership between staff and persons served. This effective recovery-oriented practice involves a major change in thinking, including the way teams work together, plans are written, issues emphasized in the recovery processes, and most importantly the role and involvement of the person served. 
Since early 2012, Austin State Hospital has participated in the PCRP Implementation Pilot, a DSHS-funded Via Hope initiative. During this Grand Rounds session, Anna Jackson, Deputy Director of Program Development at Via Hope; Diane Grieder, MEd, AliPar, Inc. and consultant to Via Hope; and Tracy Abzug, LCSW, Recovery Program Coordinator at Austin State Hospital (ASH) will present principles of the recovery model, elements of person-centered planning, how PCRP is both a change in the process and product (written documentation), and examples of successes and challenges in implementing PCRP at ASH.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, LCDC, LPC, LMFT, and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

  • Slides (.pdf)
  • Handout (.pdf)
  • Webinar recording - To request a copy of the recording on CD-ROM, contact the DSHS Audiovisual Library at avlibrary@dshs.state.tx.us. CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles not available below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Bayne H, Neukrug E, Hays D, Britton B. A comprehensive model for optimizing empathy in person-centered care. Patient Educ Couns. 2013. doi:10.1016/j.pec.2013.05.016.
  2. Claes C, Van Hove G, Vandevelde S, van Loon J, Schalock RL. Person-centered planning: analysis of research and effectiveness. Intellect Dev Disabil. 2010;48(6):432-53.
  3. Ekman I, Swedberg K, Taft C, et al. Person-centered care--ready for prime time. Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2011;10(4):248-51.
  4. Entwistle VA, Watt IS. Treating patients as persons: a capabilities approach to support delivery of person-centered care. Am J Bioeth. 2013;13(8):29-39.
  5. Jarousse LA. Patient-centered care. Hosp Health Netw. 2013 Jul;87(7):53-63.
  6. Kirkendall AM, Waldrop D, Moone RP. Caring for people with intellectual disabilities and life-limiting illness: merging person-centered planning and patient-centered, family-focused care. J Soc Work End Life Palliat Care. 2012;8(2):135-50.
  7. Stanhope V, Ingoglia C, Schmelter B, Marcus SC. Impact of person-centered planning and collaborative documentation on treatment adherence. Psychiatr Serv. 2013;64(1):76-9.
  8. Taylor JE, Taylor JA. Person-centered planning: evidence-based practice, challenges

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November 6, 2013, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Dudley
Donald Dudley, MD, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio 

11-6-13 Healthy Texas Babies: Antenatal Glucocorticoid Therapy, Past, Present, and Future

Healthy Texas Babies: Antenatal Glucocorticoid Therapy, Past, Present, and Future 
TRAIN Course ID:
1046670
Presenter: Donald Dudley, MD, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio
Description: Antenatal steroids are given to pregnant women expecting preterm delivery. During this presentation nationally recognized Dr. Donald Dudley, NICHD Advisory Board member and Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UTHSC-San Antonio will review the history of antenatal steroid therapy, current questions and problems regarding the use of antenatal steroids. Dr. Dudley will also share research and potential programs to optimize the use of antenatal steroids in complicated pregnancies.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, LPC, LMFT, and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

  • Slides (.pdf)
  • Handout (.pdf)
  • Webinar recording - To request a copy of the recording on CD-ROM, contact the DSHS Audiovisual Library at avlibrary@dshs.state.tx.us. CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles not available below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Been JV, Rours IG, Kornelisse RF, et al. Histologic chorioamnionitis, fetal involvement, and antenatal steroids: effects on neonatal outcome in preterm infants. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2009;201(6):587.
  2. Chawla S, Bapat R, Pappas A, Bara R, Zidan M, Natarajan G. Neurodevelopmental outcome of extremely premature infants exposed to incomplete, no or complete antenatal steroids. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2013;26(15):1542-7.
  3. Ferguson S, Allen VM, Craig C, Allen AC, Dodds L. Timing of indicated delivery after antenatal steroids in preterm pregnancies with severe hypertension. Hypertens Pregnancy. 2009;28(1):63-75.
  4. Hallman M, Peltoniemi O, Kari MA. Enhancing functional maturity before preterm birth. Neonatology. 2010 ;97(4):373-8.
  5. McKinlay CJ, Crowther CA, Middleton P, Harding JE. Repeat antenatal glucocorticoids for women at risk of preterm birth: a Cochrane Systematic Review. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2012;206(3):187-94.
  6. Mitsiakos G, Kovacs L, Papageorgiou A. Are antenatal steroids beneficial to severely growth restricted fetuses? J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2013;26(15):1496-9.
  7. Morrison JL, Botting KJ, Soo PS. Antenatal steroids and the IUGR fetus: are exposure and physiological effects on the lung and cardiovascular system the same as in normally grown fetuses? J Pregnancy. 2012:839656. doi:10.1155/2012/839656.
  8. Mwansa-Kambafwile J, Cousens S, Hansen T, Lawn JE. Antenatal steroids in preterm labour for the prevention of neonatal deaths due to complications of preterm birth. Int J Epidemiol. 2010;39(suppl 1):i122-33.
  9. Romejko-Wolniewicz E, Oleszczuk L, Zaręba-Szczudlik J, Czajkowski K. Dosage regimen of antenatal steroids prior to preterm delivery and effects on maternal and neonatal outcomes. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2013;26(3):237-41.

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November 13, 2013, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Patterson
Frank Patterson, Emergency Management Coordinator for City of Waco/McLennan County 

Craine
Kelly Craine, Public Information Officer, Waco-McLennan County Public Health District

Lafayette
Dana Lafayette, LPC, LP-S, LCDC, Heart of Texas MHMR

11-13-13 Best Practices in Local Public Health: The West Explosion

Best Practices in Local Public Health: The West Explosion 
TRAIN Course ID:
1046671
Presenters: Frank Patterson, Emergency Management Coordinator for City of Waco/McLennan County; Kelly Craine, Public Information Officer, Waco-McLennan County Public Health District; Dana Lafayette, LPC, LP-S, LCDC, Heart of Texas MHMR
Description: An explosion rocked the small Central Texas farming town of West on April 17, 2013. A fire at a fertilizer plant ignited stores of ammonium nitrate that resulted in an explosion the size of a small earthquake. In this presentation, representatives from the Waco-McLennan County Public Health District, the Waco-McLennan County Office of Emergency Management and the Heart of Texas MHMR will discuss the local response effort to the explosion. Learn about the precipitating factors, strategic response undertaken by the local public health/emergency management partnership, public health issues, including mental health interventions, and lessons learned.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); LPCs, LMFTs, Registered Sanitarians, and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

  • Slides (.pdf)
  • Handout (.pdf)
  • Webinar recording - To request a copy of the recording on CD-ROM, contact the DSHS Audiovisual Library at avlibrary@dshs.state.tx.us. CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles not available below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Bame SI, Parker K, Lee JY. Monitoring unmet needs: using 2-1-1 during natural disasters. Am J Prev Med. 2012;43(6)(suppl 5):S435-42.
  2. Botoseneanu A, Wu H, Wasserman J, Jacobson PD. Achieving public health legal preparedness: how dissonant views on public health law threaten emergency preparedness and response. J Public Health. 2011;33(3):361-8.
  3. Gibson PJ, Theadore F, Jellison JB. The common ground preparedness framework: a comprehensive description of public health emergency preparedness. Am J Public Health. 2012;102(4):633-42.
  4. Ingrassia PL, Prato F, Geddo A. Evaluation of medical management during a mass casualty incident exercise: an objective assessment tool to enhance direct observation. J Emerg Med. 2010;39(5):629-36.
  5. Legemaate GA, Burkle FM Jr, Bierens JJ. The evaluation of research methods during disaster exercises: applicability for improving disaster health management. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2012;27(1):18-26.
  6. McCabe OL, Barnett DJ, Taylor HG, Links JM. Ready, willing, and able: a framework for improving the public health emergency preparedness system. Disaster Med
    Public Health Prep. 2010;4(2):161-8.
  7. Oldham RL. Mental health aspects of disasters. South Med J. 2013;106(1):115-9.
  8. Savoia E, Preston J, Biddinger PD. A consensus process on the use of exercises and after action reports to assess and improve public health emergency preparedness and
    response. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2013;28(3):305-8.
  9. Watkins SM, Perrotta DM, Stanbury M. State-level emergency preparedness and response capabilities. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2011;5(suppl 1):S134-42.
  10. Zuzek C. The night west blew up. Tex Med. 2013;109(7):41-5.  

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November 20, 2013, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar
Richards
Chesley Richards, MD, MPH, Deputy Director for Public Health Scientific Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

11-20-13 Health Data and Transforming Our Approaches to Improving Population Health

Health Data and Transforming Our Approaches to Improving Population Health
TRAIN Course ID:
1046680
Presenter: Chesley Richards, MD, MPH, Deputy Director for Public Health Scientific Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Description: Health data exists in many forms and is crucial to our efforts to improve public health. Data may come from population surveys, surveillance systems or clinical encounters and, with emerging information technology advances, can be obtained more quickly and in more volume than ever before. The key to improving health is really how that data is then used to inform public health interventions and policies. In order to maximize the potential for public health action, data must be timely, affordable, and provide answers or insights into the health issues of interest to public health. Chesley Richards will share insights on the current state of health data and its use in public health, CDC health activities, and innovations in data access, storage, and visualization.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

  • Slides (.pdf)
  • Handout (.pdf)
  • Webinar recording - To request a copy of the recording on CD-ROM, contact the DSHS Audiovisual Library at avlibrary@dshs.state.tx.us. CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles not available below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Design of a national distributed health data network. Maro JC, Platt R, Holmes JH, et al. Ann Intern Med. 2009;151(5):341-4.
  2. Electronic Support for Public Health: validated case finding and reporting for notifiable diseases using electronic medical data. Lazarus R, Klompas M, Campion FX, et al. J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2009;16(1):18-24.
  3. Ethical collection, storage, and use of public health data: a proposal for a national privacy protection. Lee LM, Gostin LO. JAMA. 2009;302(1):82-4.
  4. Evidence-based public health: a fundamental concept for public health practice. Brownson RC, Fielding JE, Maylahn CM. Annu Rev Public Health. 2009;30:175-201.
  5. Integrating open-source technologies to build low-cost information systems for improved access to public health data. Yi Q, Hoskins RE, Hillringhouse EA, et al. Int J Health Geogr. 2008;7:29.
  6. Meeting the demand for results and accountability: a call for action on health data from eight global health agencies. Chan M, Kazatchkine M, Lob-Levyt J, et al. PLoS Med. 2010;7(1):e1000223.

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Last updated September 11, 2014