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    DSHS HIV/STD Program

    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, Texas 78714

    Phone: (512) 533-3000

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16th Texas HIV-STD Conference Proceedings, Tuesday, May 20, 2008

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Tuesday, May 20, 2008

Syndemics: Intersecting Epidemics and Gay Men's Health

Ronald D. Stall, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
8:30 to 9:30 am

Plenary Overview:

This presentation will present evidence to show that urban gay male communities suffer from several distinct epidemics of which HIV is only the best known. Furthermore, these epidemics interact in ways to make each other worse and also function to increase HIV risk-taking and HIV transmission. This sort of interacting epidemiological pattern is referred to as a “syndemic.” The presention will continue by focusing on the question of what might cause a syndemic among urban gay men. Data will be presented to show that violence victimization, particularly at an early age, is associated with greater number of psychosocial health problems, HIV risk-taking and HIV infection itself among gay men. The usual explanations for the existence of greater health problems among gay men is that homophobia causes poorer health among men. This presentation adds to that explanation by pointing out that if homophobia is a culture-wide phenomena, then it affects everyone, including small children and adolescents who are not in a good position to defend themselves. The experience of homophobic violence and marginalization at a very early age, in combination with a set of other variables that shape the health of men in adulthood, is directly related to syndemic production among gay men.

Prevention Works: Local and National Perspectives on Science, Policy and Programs for Community Health

Natalie Cramer
Don Des Jarlais, Ph.D.
Robert Love
Tracey Hayes
Charlene Doria-Ortiz

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
10:00 to 11:30 am

Mini-Plenary Overview:

Efforts to increase the availability of sterile needles must be a part of a broader strategy to prevent HIV among IDUs, including expanded access to drug treatment and drug-use prevention efforts. It has been well established that needle exchange programs reduce rates of HIV infection and do not increase drug use rates. The Texas Legislature recently authorized a syringe exchange pilot program in Bexar County. But more is needed; advocacy activity at the local and community level is critical. Local governments, community planning groups and public health officials should work with community groups to develop comprehensive approaches to HIV prevention among IDUs and their sexual partners, including building resources to assist injectors where there is no needle exchange. This session will provide an overview of the current state of syringe exchange in Texas and the United States, as well as a list of challenges for conference participants who want to see changes in their communities. Six syringe exchange experts representing various governmental, private and non-profit organizations will discuss the scientific, policy, and practical issues impacting this important public health initiative.

HIV and STD Testing Technologies: What Does This Mean for You?

Richard Steece, Ph.D., D(ABMM)
John Papp, Ph.D.

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
10:00 to 11:30 am

Mini-Plenary Overview:

This presentation will provide an overview of why the first HIV screening assays were developed and how the screening algorithms were established; the different tests that are currently being used to screen/test for HIV and how/why they are being used; and how the different screening algorithms apply to individual settings. The speakers will also discuss the different tests that are available for STD screening (CT and GC); the differences in testing technology and what tests may be best in individual settings; and the latest approaches to current issues in STD screening (CT and GC), e.g. alternate specimens, new laboratory guidelines, etc.

Intimate Partner Violence Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Individuals and Its Implication for HIV/STD Risk and Safe Sex Negotiation (A3)

Melanie Munk, M.A., A.B.D., L.P.C.-S.

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

Intimate partner violence (IPV) within heterosexual relationships has been increasingly studied in recent decades resulting in an expanding knowledge base and widely accepted treatment practices. Despite similar prevalence rates found among same sex partners, intimate partner violence within the LGBT community has not been adequately addressed. Oftentimes treatment agencies adapt existing materials from research with heterosexual couples and attempt to apply it to same sex couples with mixed results that do not consider the actual lived experience of the LGBT identified person. The purpose of this presentation is to examine what is actually known about IPV within the LGBT community from current research, including patterns, forms, frequency, and impact of the abuse; barriers to receiving treatment; and immerging theories related to causes for the IPV. The impact of IPV and sexual violence on the individual’s ability to negotiate safer sex will also be examined. Training professionals on the issues of the LGBT identified person experiencing IPV will benefit the victims and help ensure higher quality treatment practices. 

Perinatal HIV Transmission in the Post HAART Era (B3)

Norma Tejada, R.N., M.S.N., M.P.H., F.N.P.-C.
I. Celine Hanson, M.D.
Theresa Aldape, L.M.S.W.

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

A panel (nurse practitioner, social worker, physician) of perinatal HIV experts will discuss the unique characteristics of perinatal HIV transmission in an era of increased highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) use during pregnancy (i.e. 2000’s). Specific topics of discussion will include distinctions between in utero and perinatal HIV transmission, challenges of case management for HIV-infected pregnant women in HAART era, opportunities for transmission prevention (e.g. Rapid testing) and altering current State of Texas Health code for HIV testing in pregnant women. Three patient case scenarios with perinatal HIV transmission will be presented and audience discussion will be encouraged. Attendees will receive a checklist for perinatal HIV transmission prevention tips including hospital, laboratory and pharmacy capacity assessment tool and case management warning signs for transmission.

Strategies for Effective Grant Writing: Tips for Beginners (C3)

Julie Doyle
Christopher Schmitt, B.A., M.P.H. Candidate

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

These are very challenging times for nonprofit agencies. Demands for service are increasing even as there is more competition for charitable dollars and public funds. Executive Directors and administrative and program staff are stretched thin as they strive to make every dollar work for their clients. Many already carry an administrative burden that makes seeking additional funds a daunting, seemingly impossible task. Who has time to gather data, develop a program and budget, and put it all together to present a case for funding? This workshop will present a model of grantsmanship to create core components of a grant application that reflect the true context of community need and place the nonprofit in the best position for successful funding. 

Together We Rise: A Drama on HIV-Positive Women Responding to STIGMA (D3)

Sylvia Lopez
Yolanda Rodríguez-Escobar, L.M.S.W.

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

The Women Rising Project is a program for women with HIV/AIDS in central Texas that strengthens HIV-positive women through education, support and advocacy. Together We Rise, a performance piece, was designed, developed and performed for World AIDS Day in 2004 by six HIV-positive women who struggled with stigma due to their HIV status. Since then it has been performed in churches, at the AIDS Walk and on the steps of the State Capital. In 2006, the model was adapted by Mujeres Unidas, a Latina-focused HIV support and educational organization in San Antonio. The response indicates that this model is an effective way to reach community, raise awareness and diminish isolation. Stigma remains the principle barrier to disclosure and advocacy. Stigma contributes to lack of HIV/AIDS awareness and compassion. Moreover, stigma is often cited as a reason why persons decline to know their HIV status, refuse to hear HIV prevention messages and, if HIV-positive, remain out of care. Stigma keeps HIV-positive people behind closed doors. Together We Rise dramatizes the struggles of HIV-positive women and their triumph of coming together from behind closed doors. Performed by six women, this piece has no speaking parts; therefore, it requires neither specific talents nor a disclosure by any of the performers. This presentation will include a performance and will feature a panel of HIV-positive women performers who will share their perspectives. Furthermore, it will demonstrate how two women-centered agencies have partnered to share and adapt a unique intervention. 

Hombres Preparados: An HIV/AIDS Education Program for Promotores Serving Farmworker Men (E3)

Monica Saavedra-Embesi, C.H.E.S.

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

HIV/AIDS is a serious problem in the Hispanic community. In 2001, HIV/AIDS was the third highest cause of death among Hispanic men ages 35 to 44. Even though Hispanics make up only about 14% of the population of the United States, they account for 20% of AIDS cases since the beginning of the outbreak. In fact, just between the years of 2000-2004, it is estimated that 142,000 Hispanic men were diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. Hispanics are part of a group of people who speak many different languages and come from different countries, classes and cultures. It is hard to talk about Hispanics as one group of people, because they may have very different needs depending on their country, class or culture. The male farmworker population is a group within the Hispanic community that has very different needs, and is often overlooked. There are many HIV resources for Hispanics, but there are few that address the unique challenges and risk factors of a group of people that constantly move and travel alone. Being a farmworker alone does not mean they are more at risk of being infected with HIV, but solo male migrant and seasonal farmworkers face a different number of situations that put them at higher risk of becoming infected with HIV. For this reason, the National Center for Farmworker Health (NCFH) conducted a series of focus groups across the country, to assist us in identifying key cultural components and other unique barriers they face, which were to be included in and HIV/AIDS education and training curriculum called Hombres Preparados. During this workshop, we will present focus group findings related to cultural beliefs and other unique risk factors farmworkers face with regards to HIV/AIDS which are critical components of an HIV/AIDS program for this population. Some of these include: religion, time orientation, machismo, familismo, living situations, loneliness, use of illegal drugs or use of medicines that are self-injected and unprotected sex. The presenter will also discuss a training curriculum and teaching tools available to conduct education and outreach in your farmworker communities. Come learn about these important elements and how you can incorporate them into your next HIV/AIDS program for farmworkers.

Bexar County Harm Reduction (Needle Exchange) Pilot Program (F3)

Aurora M. Sanchez
Charlene Doria-Ortiz

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

In May 2007, the Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill (SB) 10 which authorized the establishment of a pilot program to prevent the spread of certain diseases and the anonymous exchange of needles and syringes in Bexar County. Amidst legal opinion controversy, the Bexar County Department of Community Investment is forging ahead to plan, design and implement the first legalized needle exchange program (NEP) in Texas. The Bexar County Community Investment Staff will present background information on Needle exchange programs in the US, harm reduction concepts and an overview of the Bexar County Harm Reduction Pilot program and its components. Discussion will follow the presentation including a question and answer session on the program framework, barriers to implementation, current status, and the planned future of the program.

Project STYLE: An Innovative Model of HIV Outreach and Linkage to Care for Young HIV-Positive MSM of Color (G3)

Justin C. Smith

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

A 2003 outbreak of HIV infections among college men, most of whom were young Black men, on campuses throughout North Carolina highlighted the need for programs to address the needs of this community. Project STYLE (Strength Through Youth Livin’ Empowered) was created to help address the unique challenges faced by young HIV-positive Black men in North Carolina. This session will present lessons learned and preliminary data from this HRSA Special Projects of National Significance (SPNS) funded initiative to provide outreach, testing, and linkage to care for HIV positive Black MSM. The session will also highlight the voices of these young men with regard to issues including stigma, religion, race and masculinity.

Magnet Couples: When He's Positive and She's Not (H3)

Catherine D. Novak, B.A., L.C.D.C.
Larry Diaz

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

Literature about sero-discordant, or magnetic couples sometimes focuses more on men who have sex with men or bisexual couples. Due to this, heterosexual couples may be less seen, heard from, or talked about. However the latest information supports the probability of a “hidden” or unreported, misreported, or untested population. Sero-discordant heterosexual couples in which the male partner is HIV-positive are often not discussed. It is the hope of the presenters that talking about their relationship and the latest research done on magnetic heterosexual couples will open the door for other positive/negative straight couples to see they are not alone. The speakers further hope that this discussion will spark dialogue amongst professionals about how to better provide a multidisciplinary approach to services for the needs and demographics of this and other client populations.

What's Up with Syphilis? The Increase of Syphilis in Texas (I3)

Robert Aguirre
Karen Surita
Ed Weckerly

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

This presentation will discuss the increase and the distribution of syphilis cases in Texas. The symptoms, stages and types of syphilis will be simply outlined. The economic cost and the health impact of syphilis as well as the methods to control syphilis will be discussed. The intended audience of the session is participants with a minimal experience in the STD and/or HIV field.

A Review of Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Trends Among Young Women in Selected Family Planning and STD Clinics (J3)

Jennifer Curtiss, M.Ed.

Tuesday, May 20, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

Since 1996, the Region VI Infertility Prevention Project (IPP) has provided screening and treatment for chlamydia (CT) and gonorrhea (GC) to women attending family planning (FP) and STD clinics in southwestern U.S. A study was implemented to assess trends in CT and GC among women aged 15-24 years attending these clinics and to explore race/ethnic differences in CT/GC prevalence. This presentation will explore the results of the study. Among young women seen at FP and STD clinics, demographic differences in CT/GC were enduring and widespread. Eliminating racial and ethnic disparities will require enhanced efforts at preventing disease, promoting health and delivering appropriate care. This will necessitate improved collection and use of standardized data to correctly identify all high risk populations and monitor the effectiveness of health interventions targeting these groups. Future work should explore additional client, clinic and community factors affecting CT/GC. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe CT and GC trends among young adult women tested at FP and STD clinics in Public Health Service Region VI. They will also be able to describe age and race differences by clinic type within this high risk population.


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Last updated May 22, 2013