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    DSHS HIV/STD Program

    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, Texas 78714

    Phone: (512) 533-3000

    E-mail the HIV/STD Program

    E-mail data requests to HIV/STD Program - This email can be used to request data and statistics on HIV, TB, and STDs in Texas. It cannot be used to get treatment or infection history for individuals, or to request information on programs and services. Please do not include any personal, identifying health information in your email such as HIV status, Date of Birth, Social Security Number, etc.

    For treatment/testing history, please contact your local Health Department.

    For information on HIV testing and services available to Persons Living with HIV and AIDS, please contact your local HIV services organization.

16th Texas HIV-STD Conference Proceedings, Wednesday, May 21, 2008

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Wednesday, May 21, 2008

A Step Toward Whole Health: Integration of Services at the Client Level

Kevin P. O'Connor, M.A.
Donald J. Clark, M.A.
Murray C. Penner
Andrew J. Heetderks, M.P.H.
Casey S. Blass - Moderator

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
8:30 to 9:30 am

Plenary Overview:

With the evolution in the epidemiology of HIV, viral hepatitis, STD and TB in the United States, many prevention partners are shifting their focus from “what” they deliver to “how” they deliver it. Promoting improved collaboration between programs and integration of preventative services are important tools in meeting this challenge. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has defined Program Collaboration and Service Integration (PCSI) as a way to organize and blend inter-related health issues, separate activities and services in order to maximize public health impact through new and established links between programs to aid the delivery of services. The focus of PCSI is on integrated service delivery at a client level. CDC’s vision for program collaboration and service integration is to provide prevention services that are holistic, evidence based, comprehensive and high quality to appropriate populations at every interaction with the health system. A shift in focus from “what” is delivered to “how” it is delivered requires an acknowledgement of the current barriers to PCSI, and potential solutions. It also requires that CDC keep pace with the needs of prevention partners, as well as resources, at their disposal. By prioritizing PSCI, it is CDC’s hope that prevention partners will increase their ability to innovate within the boundaries of current fiscal requirements, and meet changing demands more rapidly, with greater levels of flexibility, efficiency and customer satisfaction. This panel presentation will offer attendees an overview of the PCSI initiative and what it means to HIV, STD, viral hepatitis, and TB service provision now and into the future.

Mi Gente, Mi Salud - My People, My Health (Innovative Ways to Reach Latinos)

Oscar Raúl López

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
10:00 to 11:30 am

Mini-Plenary Overview:

Latino health is often shaped by factors such as language and cultural barriers, lack of access to preventive care, and the lack of health insurance. The CDC has cited HIV/AIDS as a leading factor in the health and well being of Latinos

  • Latinos accounted for 18 percent of HIV/AIDS cases in 2005.
  • Latino males had over 3 times the AIDS rate as non-Latino white males.
  • Latinas had over 5 times the AIDS rate as non-Latinas.
  • Latino males were 2.6 times as likely to die from HIV/AIDS as non-Latino white men.
  • Latinas were 4 times as likely to die from HIV/AIDS as non-Latina white women in 2004.

Cultural Competency is vitally important to Latino health - quite simply, health care services that are responsive and respectful of the health beliefs and practices, and cultural and linguistic needs of diverse Latino populations are the most successful. Culture and language may influence:

  • health, healing, and wellness belief systems;
  • how illness, disease, and their causes are perceived; both by the patient/consumer and
  • the behaviors of patients/clients who are seeking health care and their attitudes toward health care providers;
  • as well as the delivery of services by the provider who looks at the world through his or her own limited set of values, which can compromise access for clients from other cultures.

The increasing growth of the Latino community, with its own cultural traits and health profiles, presents a challenge to the health care delivery service industry in this country. The provider and the client each bring their individual learned patterns of language and culture to the health care experience which must be transcended to achieve equal access and quality health care.

Lost Opportunities: Late HIV Diagnosis, Delayed Treatment and Unmet Need for Care

Ann Robbins, Ph.D.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
10:00 to 11:30 am

The Internet as a Portal for Healthy Change (A4)

Oscar Raúl López

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

The Internet is an important venue for civic organizing, social networking and meeting potential sex partners. The Internet as a Portal for Healthy Change targets health and youth organizations wanting to reach young people with sexual health information, disease prevention education and community mobilization efforts. Connected Health Solutions, the nation's foremost authority in developing, launching and evaluating Internet-based disease prevention interventions has provided technical assistance on the subject for federal agencies and national AIDS organizations since 1999. Lessons learned from current projects in Washington, D.C. (targeting young trans women with sexual health information), Texas (providing HIV/STD testing on both sides of the US/Mexico border) and New York City (implementing Popular Opinion Leader – an intervention that trains, and enlists the help of key opinion leaders to change risky sexual norms and behaviors in the gay community) will be highlighted. The workshop encourages those who have not considered exploring the Internet as a potential venue for health promotion to do so, by explaining how to assess their organizational capacity, tailor one of our six models and seven approaches to meet the needs of their target population, provide the service responsibly and effectively, and evaluate their impact. Special considerations for developing effective interventions for young people will be examined to ensure that youth cultures are respected and that agencies are fully aware of laws that could impact their efforts. Organizations will learn how to harness the use of websites, banner ads, chat rooms, classified ads and blogs to positively impact young people's lives.

An Informatics Evaluation of the Texas HIV/AIDS Reporting System (HARS) (B4)

Catherine Pepper, M.L.I.S., M.P.H.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

The HIV/AIDS Reporting System (HARS) is an ongoing, population-based surveillance system, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), designed to monitor the total number of reported HIV/AIDS cases in the United States. This presentation will detail an informatics-based evaluation of the Texas HARS, including graphical representations of the current and future systems and their performance in terms of timeliness, completeness, data quality, etc. An estimation of the system's public health impact will also be provided.

Effective Program Evaluations through the Use of Logic Models (C4)

Christopher Schmitt, B.A., M.P.H. Candidate
Naomi Madrid

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

Effective program evaluation does more than collect, analyze, and provide data. Evaluation makes it possible for program staff to learn continually about and improve programs in order to best meet the needs of their clients. Yet evaluation continues to be a scary word for many in the nonprofit world who feel they do not have the time, expertise, or resources for evaluation activities. This workshop will present a logic model for program planning and evaluation that facilitates effective programming and greater learning opportunities, better documentation of meaningful outcomes, and shared knowledge about what works and why.

Rural Street Outreach in North Texas (D4)

Randy Parsons, L.C.D.C.
Erica Cunningham, M.A.
Elizabeth Ann Rose, M.S.S.W.- L.M.S.W.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

This presentation is to call attention to the expanded work in Texas by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) the drug prevention arm of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) as opposed to the on-going work in HIV/AIDS by the CDC. CSAP has funded 50 sites in Texas to use evidence based interventions to target those who are at risk for substance abuse and engage in risk taking behaviors leading to exposure and contraction of HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis. The grants require education and testing of individuals with risk factors for substance abuse primarily focused on the minority community. The Rural Street Outreach Program was developed and designed to begin providing HIV and substance abuse prevention to rural counties surrounding Tarrant County. The Request for Proposal (RFP) asked for from SAMHSA/CSAP was for a five-year program to build community capacity and to target minority communities in prevention/intervention methods and practices. This program was developed as a response to the data concerning minority populations in rural Texas, the increasing incidences of HIV and substance abuse, and the lack of services available. This proposal also included re-entry populations, residents of the target areas, transient populations (e.g. truck drivers), and colleges/universities. This presentation will discuss the developmental process, problems, solutions and successes involved in development a rural outreach program. Discussion will be directed toward “real life experience” and will include the current capacity building methods; the media based campaign, and the day-to-day operation delivering the message of prevention/intervention. This presentation will inform those currently engaged in other funding streams and alert them to additional work being done in the field of disease prevention but being funded through other streams. This knowledge can lead to possible opportunities to stretch resources, eliminate duplication of services, and possible collaborations that can be developed between sites with different funding avenues.

How to Document Your "Home Grown" Intervention (E4)

Marilyn Pyeatt, B.A.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

For years, HIV prevention programs have developed “home-grown” behavioral interventions that are embraced by the community. However, these programs are often short on both time and personnel to devote to developing materials to document these interventions effectively. Agencies would benefit from a time-efficient yet thorough system that will help them create clear, accurate, and user-friendly manuals that can be used to share these interventions with others or develop evaluation materials. Staff at UT Southwestern Medical Center recently used a “task analysis” approach to design curriculum for a behavioral intervention. They analyzed specific major activities or “tasks” required to implement the intervention. Each task was divided into the activities or “sub-tasks” necessary to complete the task. Sub-tasks were further broken down into five to nine detailed actions or “steps” required to complete the sub-task steps. These steps described precisely how to perform the sub-task. This type of task analysis both required a thorough understanding of the intervention to be implemented and developed additional insight. It allowed for creation of realistic budgets and timelines, as well as detailed implementation procedures. The time required was reasonable particularly considering the benefits accrued. Using this style of task analysis, program staff can document interventions in an efficient manner, while increasing their understanding of how to implement the intervention itself. UT Southwestern staff will conduct an overview of the technique, introduce task analysis tools for use in “home-grown” intervention documentation, and facilitate practice of the tools.

HIV/STD Prevention Needs and Interventions for Adolescent MSM (F4)

Adam King
Michael A. Bennett Hardy

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

This presentation will provide information on the issues surrounding HIV/STD prevention programming for adolescent men who have sex with men (MSM). During the presentation participants will learn of the needs of adolescent MSM in regards to prevention. The presentation will cover the factors that inhibit HIV/STD prevention within the adolescent MSM community and prevention programs that can effectively address HIV/STD prevention amongst adolescent MSM.

The Alarming Increase in Anal Cancer and Dysplasia in HIV Populations (G4)

Jason Nevoit, R.N., B.S.N., B.A.
Stephen Weis, D.O.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

This presentation will review anal dysplasia screening and treatment for HIV/AIDS clients including risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of anal carcinoma. Also covered will be a description of Tarrant County's results over the past two years in a clinic that provides primary care to persons with HIV/AIDS. We will also discuss why this should be a part of routine HIV/AIDS care.

Case Management of High-Risk TB/HIV Co-infected Patients (H4)

Gregory B. Barnes, M.A.
Johnny Harris
Richard Stancil

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

This presentation will cover the issues and challenges in managing the high-risk TB/HIV co-infected patient. These patients are considered high-risk because of chronic homelessness and/or active substance abuse. The primary take-home message is that chronically homeless persons who test positive for HIV are at a particularly high risk for exposure to TB. If found to be co-infected, these individuals should be considered “high priority” in terms of linking them with much needed medical and social services. 

Dallas County Medical Mobile Unit: Going Where Few Have Dared To Go Before (I4)

Rebecca Atkins, D.I.S., B.S.W.
Billy Riddle
Juan Carrion

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

This workshop will describe exactly what the Medical Mobile Clinic (MMC) is capable of doing on a daily basis and how the community participates with this combined effort. The MMC consists of a driver, a disease intervention specialist, Syphilis Elimination Coordinator, two phlebotomists, a nurse practitioner, lab technician and several community based organizations to offer a full continuum of services to the community. This includes targeted screenings, treatment, testing, counseling, and referrals.

STD Technology Projects (J4)

Todd Logan, L.M.S.W.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
1:30 to 3:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

Statistics show the infection rate among the identified partners of HIV-infected persons to be eight times higher than the rate of infection found at DSHS-funded Counseling and Testing sites across Texas. Using traditional tools, Disease Intervention Specialists connect everyday with this population. Recently a host of new tools have become available to us. This workshop will explore how these tools are utilized in Texas public health and HIV prevention activities.

A New Blueprint for the Nation: Ending the Epidemic through the Power of Prevention (A5)

Murray C. Penner

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
3:30 to 5:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

Since the beginning of the epidemic, HIV prevention programs, led by health departments, have provided the skills and tools necessary to millions of Americans to reduce or eliminate the risks associated with HIV transmission. The public health system's potential has never fully been realized, with health department programs being constrained by external influences which have limited the ability to control epidemics in local jurisdictions. At the same time, the continued growth of HIV/AIDS prevalence, particularly among gay men and other men who have sex with men as well as African-Americans, has led to increased demands on an already-overburdened system. The National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors' (NASTAD) blueprint asserts that we must scale up America's response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Health department programs must be given the support necessary to offer full coverage of services that work in order to have the greatest impact possible. This session will examine NASTAD's HIV prevention agenda entitled A New Blueprint for the Future and its accompanying policy agenda and will provide opportunities for feedback about implementing recommendations. Principles of the blueprint which will be explored during the session include:

  1. Provide adequate funding for HIV prevention programs (including core prevention, surveillance and public information).
  2. Invest in programs that work at the local level (access to sterile injection equipment, prevention services in correctional settings and comprehensive sexuality education). Support these programs with ongoing research.
  3. Invest in programs that facilitate core HIV prevention activities like sexually transmitted disease (STD) treatment, adult vaccination programs, microbicides, substance abuse and mental health services and housing.
  4. Demand that the federal government provide coordination, funding and meaningful support for locally driven and developed HIV prevention programs.
  5. Ensure effective and locally appropriate approaches are being implemented in every jurisdiction in the U.S.

HIV Incidence Estimates and Antiretroviral Drug Resistant HIV in Texas (B5)

Cheryl L. E. Jablonski, M.P.H., M.A.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
3:30 to 5:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

A new testing technology, Serologic Testing Algorithm for Recent HIV-1 Seroconversion (STARHS), allows determination of recent infection within six months of diagnostic testing. Incidence Surveillance using STARHS allows more timely and precise monitoring of the HIV infection in Texas than previous methods. Antiretroviral (ARV) drug resistant virus can be transmitted to newly infected persons who have no previous HIV treatment. HIV Incidence Surveillance was introduced in Texas in June 2005 under the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) standard procedures. Remnants of confirmed HIV-positive specimens were obtained and shipped to a CDC-contracted laboratory for testing to distinguish recent from long-standing infections. STARHS results were linked by an identification number with surveillance data regarding the HIV testing behavior of each patient. This additional information allowed a statistical estimation of HIV incidence in the general population. When enough volume of specimen remained after testing with STARHS, leftover specimens were sent to Stanford University for genotyping of the virus. An overview of results of this testing will be discussed regarding HIV mutations and drug resistance in Texas. This workshop will provide an overview of results of testing using STARHS for newly diagnosed HIV infections, testing and treatment history information collected for newly diagnosed HIV infections, population-based HIV incidence estimates and, description of HIV drug resistance and non-B subtypes in Texas. Incidence Surveillance and HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance allow an increased capacity to track the leading edge of infection trends in Texas and nationwide. These data will help guide HIV prevention and services planning and program evaluation. The prevalence of drug resistant HIV and non-B subtypes in populations has implications for clinical care of HIV-infected persons. This workshop will explore such questions as how incidence estimates help plan and evaluate HIV prevention programs, how DSHS can make these estimates more meaningful to you and, how the presented information about ARV drug resistance impact what you do in prevention or care. Additional information that will be helpful to participants working in the field will also be sought.

Stories From the Front Line: Approaching Difficult Quality Problems in the Real World (C5)

Kathleen Clanon, M.D.
Susan Traynor, C.A.R.N., B.S.N., R.N.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
3:30 to 5:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

This presentation will provide an introduction of National Quality Center (NQC) as well as the quality requirements mandated by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HIV quality measures, data for measures, disposition of data results, and future directions HRSA is taking with quality measures will also be presented.

Integration of Viral Hepatitis Prevention Activities into HIV/STD and other Public Health Programs (D5-A)

Gary L. Heseltine, M.D., M.P.H.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
3:30 to 4:15 pm

Workshop Overview:

Why integrate hepatitis services into the HIV setting? Chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death for persons with HIV infection. Since the risk factors for hepatitis and HIV overlap, there are commonalities in counseling and prevention methods. Harm reduction is a core strategy to reduce both hepatitis and HIV infections. Strategies to integrate hepatitis services into the HIV setting are examined as well as the common barriers to integration. The need for referral resources and barriers to treatment for hepatitis are discussed.

Behavioral Surveillance among Internet-Using MSM: The Web-based HIV Behavioral Surveillance Project in Texas (D5-B)

Richard K. Yeager, Ph.D.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
4:15 to 5:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

The web-based HIV Behavioral Surveillance project (WHBS) was a pilot project designed to test the feasibility of recruiting participants and conducting behavioral surveys of men who have sex with men (MSM) over the internet. MSM using the internet to meet sexual partners have been reported to engage in increased risk behaviors and may not be reached by traditional physical-venue sampling methods.

National HIV Behavioral Surveillance Findings From First Cycle: Houston, Texas (E5)

Paige Padgett, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Jane Richards
Hafeez Ur Rehman, M.D., M.P.H.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
3:30 to 5:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

This presentation will describe the results from the Houston site of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance project (NHBS). NHBS is a CDC-funded population-based behavioral surveillance program, designed to collect sexual, drug-use, and HIV testing behaviors, and prevention service utilization among three populations at high risk of HIV infection: men who have sex with men (MSM), injection drug users (IDU), and heterosexuals (HET) living areas with high rates of HIV. This presentation reports on the general methodologies and findings from the MSM, IDU, and HET cycles conducted in Houston, Texas from 2004 through 2007. We collected interviews from 682 MSM, 601 IDU, and 938 HET interviews using venue-based sampling (MSM), and respondent driven sampling (IDU and HET). Basic demographic and risk behaviors will be presented for each population. HIV testing behavior is described here. Among the MSM, 7% reported that they had never tested for HIV; HIV testing behavior was not associated with age or education. Among those who had tested, 14% self-reported that they were infected with HIV. Among the IDU, 22% reported that they had never tested; testing was associated with age and education. 9% of the 406 reporting HIV testing self-reported HIV infection. Among the HET sample, 20% reported that they had never tested for HIV; testing was not associated with age or education. We conducted HIV testing in the HET population and found 1.8% to be infected. Although HIV infection rates are high among MSM, IDU, and HET, HIV testing is not at an appropriate level.

Reaching the Untouchable, Touching the Unreachable: Basic Skills for Reaching African American Men and Women through Faith-Based Community Outreach (F5)

Ratonia C. Runnels, L.M.S.W.
Roger Temme, M.Div.
Sam Price

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
3:30 to 5:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

This presentation is ideal for community workers seeking to reach African-American heterosexual women and men, African American men who have sex with men, and other individuals not identified in traditional target areas. Participants will explore barriers to integrating faith-based organizations into community outreach. Participants will discuss challenges as well as common goals in targeting faith-based communities. We will also examine the principles of cooperation, coordination, and motivation as catalysts for change. Participants will become familiar with strategies enabling them to facilitate open, honest, and factual discussions within faith-based communities and organizations and have an opportunity to brainstorm ideas and share what has proven effective in their own communities. Participants will also be given relevant examples of culturally appropriate program activities that can be used in traditional faith settings. There will be a small group activity regarding faith-based outreach and coordination following the presentation. The Black Faith-Based Health Initiative and The Care Communities will serve as models for other collaborative efforts seeking opportunities to engage the faith community in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

Getting from Here to There: The Medical Case Management Project (G5)

Crystal Crowell, M.P.H.
Christopher Hamilton, M.P.H.
Ellen Fontana, R.N., M.S.N., A.P.N.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
3:30 to 5:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

Case management is vital to linking HIV-positive individuals to necessary medical and support services. During the 2006-07 Ryan White grant year, 96% of individuals accessing services supported by Ryan White Part B funds outside of Part A delivery areas used case management. With the introduction of the Ryan White Treatment Modernization Act in December of 2006, there has been a shift from social case management to the clinically focused medical case management. Beyond the requirements of the modernization act, DSHS wishes to develop a case management system which supports client need as well as assists clients in developing self efficacy. To this end, the DSHS has undertaken an extensive study of case management which includes a review of current literature regarding delivery models, systems currently in use in other Ryan White jurisdictions and case management systems as they currently function in Texas. Finally, DSHS will call together a panel of experts, stakeholders and clients to review the information gathered, make recommendations toward improving the systems in Texas and incorporating and expanding the availability of medical case management. This workshop will offer participants a review of the current state of this study as well as a first look at early information gained in the process.

Capacity Building and Collaboration Among HIV Physicians on Both Sides of the Texas-Mexico Border (H5)

Laura Armas-Kolostroubis, M.D.
Tracy Tessmann, M.A.
Oscar Gonzalez, M.S.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
3:30 to 5:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

Providing clinical care to people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) has been a challenge for clinicians serving both sides of the US-Mexico border given the high mobility of their clients, differences in clinical resources and protocols on either side of the border, insurance coverage, and other socio-economic issues. Since 1999, the Texas/Oklahoma AIDS Education and Training Center (AETC) has been providing education and training to clinicians on the U.S. side of the Texas-Mexico border. The demand for similar trainings in Mexico was met by Parkland Hospital and other border clinicians with private funding. The objectives were to share with their Mexican colleagues the clinical and patient management experiences of U.S.-based clinicians and to develop a system of collaboration among clinicians on both sides of the border. Although several meetings had previously taken place, in the past two years we narrowed the scope and sought a more systematic process for establishing cross border collaboration. Bi-national clinician round tables were held at La Fe CARE Center in El Paso and at Valley AIDS Council in Harlingen, with approximately 15 and 45 participants respectively. The groups were presented with five basic questions that sought to explore the level of bi-national collaboration including: exploring the current situation, where we needed to be and how would we get there. Findings illustrate that bi-national health care use is common, having implications for HIV service delivery in both countries. Although many HIV providers (physicians and other clinicians) are already collaborating with their counterparts on the other side of the border, there was still a good deal of information that needed to be shared and obstacles to overcome in the management of migrant and bi-national patients. Although much progress has been made on both sides of the Border, maintaining continuity of care, especially given the differences in treatment guidelines, medication availability, laboratory services, and client resources, is still a challenge that can be much improved with greater bi-national physician collaboration to better understand and address individual, provider and system level barriers to HIV care on the US-Texas border.

When to Test for Herpes (I5-C)

Rachel Lowry, R.N., B.S.N.
Steven Wilson, M.D., M.P.H.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
4:10 to 5:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is a sexually transmitted virus. It is a major concern for many patients who go to STD clinics for testing. It frequently results in labor-intensive counseling sessions. There is no cure for herpes, a fact that most people know. Unfortunately, it is the only fact most people know, and leads to many patients having inaccurate information derived from ambiguous resources. More information about HSV needs to be available to the general public: how common it is and, most importantly, the fact that it is not fatal and won't become a different infection. There are many valid reasons for someone to seek testing. Patients presenting with genital lesions or ulcers, pregnant women, immuno-compromised patients, and women who want to become pregnant are all appropriate candidates for testing. Counseling guidelines will be addressed to help the clinician discuss herpes with patients. Methods of HSV testing, treatment options, including medications available, and prevention guidelines will be covered.

Quality STD DIS Audits Are Your Friends! (J5)

Brian Anthony Barron
Elaine Allen

Wednesday, May 21, 2008
3:30 to 5:00 pm

Workshop Overview:

STD disease intervention specialist (DIS) audits are a required part of quality program management. Participants who attend this session will be able to describe the purpose and frequency of audits, as well as the required forms and what constitutes quality documentation. Participants will also learn how to track and examine audits over time to improve both individual worker and program outcomes. Operations managers, program managers, first line supervisors, and DIS should attend this session.


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Last updated May 22, 2013