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    DSHS HIV/STD Program

    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, Texas 78714

    Phone: (512) 533-3000

    E-mail the HIV/STD Program

    E-mail data requests to HIV/STD Program - This email can be used to request data and statistics on HIV, TB, and STDs in Texas. It cannot be used to get treatment or infection history for individuals, or to request information on programs and services. Please do not include any personal, identifying health information in your email such as HIV status, Date of Birth, Social Security Number, etc.

    For treatment/testing history, please contact your local Health Department.

    For information on HIV testing and services available to Persons Living with HIV and AIDS, please contact your local HIV services organization.

17th Texas HIV-STD Conference Poster Presentations

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Wednesday, May 26, 2010

3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Grand Ballroom B

Poster Presentation 1
Treatment Advocacy Program
Antonio Moises Martinez,
Case Manager, International AIDS Empowerment, El Paso, Texas
International AIDS Empowerment proposed to implement a comprehensive bilingual, culturally appropriate, intensive HIV treatment education program in the West Texas/Southern New Mexico region. The program specifically targets newly diagnosed individuals, but will also target individuals with treatment experience. The goal of the program is to improve health outcomes of HIV positive individuals via education and the development of a support system of peers. All materials are available in both English and Spanish. Knowledge Level: Beginning

Poster Presentation 2
Student-led LBGT Organizations Advocate for Greater HIV/AIDS Awareness to their Peers
Nisha Loganantharaj,
Student Assistant, University of Texas HIV Prevention Project, Austin, Texas
Todd Harvey, M.A., Research Associate, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Karol Kaye Harris, Ph.D., Researcher, University of Texas at Austin, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, Austin, Texas
Young men who have sex with men currently bear a disproportionate burden of new HIV infections in Texas. Some speculate a generation gap exists in the LGBT community between those who lived through the 1980s and 1990s during the height of the AIDS epidemic in comparison to those who came of age later. The latter group may not view HIV/AIDS as an important health concern to their generation. This poster explores the actions of student-led LGBT groups on the campuses of Texas universities and colleges. Knowledge Level: Beginning

Poster Presentation 3
Taking It to the Streets: Mobile Outreach
Robert D. Dabney, II,
Risk Reduction Specialist, Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services Department, Austin, Texas
Those at the greatest risk of HIV/STD infections are the least likely to seek the services of risk reduction counseling and testing. The Dodge Sprinter-Mobile Outreach Vehicle (MOV) provides risk reduction counseling and testing services that is a better fit with the environment of sex workers and substance users. Mobile outreach units greatly enhance our ability to reach hard-to-reach populations. Knowledge Level: Intermediate 

Poster Presentation 4
Routine HIV Testing in a Safety Net Hospital Emergency Services Department
Mae Rupert, B.S.,
Development Associate, Parkland Health and Hospital System, Dallas, Texas
Sylvia Moreno, B.S.N., R.N., Director of Nursing-HIV, Parkland Health and Hospital System, Dallas, Texas
Martha O'Brien, B. S. N., A.C.R.N., HIV Clinical Access Coordinator/Medical Case Manager, Parkland Health and Hospital System Emergency Services Department, Dallas, Texas
In the Dallas Eligible Metropolitan Area (EMA), many individuals with HIV are entering care late with advanced HIV disease. In 2007, among the persons with AIDS, 33% were first diagnosed HIV-positive within 12 months of AIDS diagnosis, and 25% were first diagnosed HIV-positive within one month of AIDS diagnosis. Some studies have shown that individuals unaware of their HIV infection are 3.5 times more likely to transmit the virus to others. Timely testing of HIV-positive individuals through routine HIV testing is important to improve health outcomes and to slow HIV transmission. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 5
Texas Statewide Cross-Part Quality Improvement Collaboration: Past, Present, and Future
Susan Traynor, C.A.R.N., B.S.N., R.N.,
Texas Cross-Part QM Collaborative Lead Support, Austin, Texas
James Martinez, Texas Cross-Part QM Collaborative Lead Team, El Paso, Texas
Mark Peppler, Texas Cross-Part QM Collaborative Leader, Austin, Texas
Mike Kinser, Texas Cross-Part QM Collaborative Lead Team, Weatherford, Texas
Dan Culica, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., Texas Cross-Part QM Collaborative Lead Team, Dallas, Texas
Lionel Hillard, Texas Cross-Part QM Collaborative Lead Team, Dallas, Texas
Karina Loyo, Texas Cross-Part QM Collaborative Lead Team, Austin, Texas
The Texas Statewide Cross-Part Quality Improvement Collaboration started in May 2008 transitioning into the HAB Five State Cross-Part Quality Improvement Collaborative for an 18-month stint. The poster will depict the Texas Cross-Part past and present improvement efforts including successes and challenges. A crucial concept of the board presentation will share the future direction for improving HIV services across the state of Texas through the ongoing cross-Part collaboration. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 6
Collaborative Efforts: Nurses in Emergency Department and County Health Department Promote Successful HIV Care
Martha E. O'Brien, B.S.N., A.C.R.N.,
HIV Clinical Access Coordinator/Medical Case Manager, Parkland Health and Hospital System Emergency Services Department, Dallas, Texas
Deborah Anthony, M.S.N., R.N., F.N.P., B.C., Nurse Practitioner, Dallas County Health Department, HIV Early Intervention Clinic, Dallas, Texas
HIV-infected persons often present for medical care late in disease process. This results in very ill persons presenting to the emergency department (ED) or health department with complex medical and psychosocial needs. As a result, personnel in a large urban ED developed a referral network addressing critical/complex needs. The purpose is to identify this high-risk population and create a safety net for ongoing seamless HIV/AIDS medical management. The EIC team serves newly diagnosed HIV-positive persons in various stages of emotional and psychosocial crises. Often, multiple agencies are needed to address complex issues such as STDs, TB, Hepatitis, food/shelter, counseling and transportation assistance. Persons with complex needs responded favorably to this collaborative approach involving several disciplines/multiple agencies. This collaboration increased provider credibility, resulting in patient engagement in HIV care. Implications for prevention, treatment, and care are addressed. Handouts [Slideshare] Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 7
HIV/AIDS in a Large Urban Emergency Services Department (ESD)
Thomas Emanuele, B.S.N., R.N.-B.C., A.C.R.N., C.C.M.,
Case Management Manager, Parkland Health and Hospital System, HIV Services/Care Management Departments, Dallas, Texas
Martha E. O'Brien, B.S.N., A.C.R.N., HIV Clinical Access Coordinator/Medical Case Manager, Parkland Health and Hospital System Emergency Services Department, Dallas, Texas
This poster describes a study of the experiences of patients with HIV infection who seek emergency HIV medical care in a large urban hospital ESD. Results presented are by age, ethnicity, level of immunosuppression, substance use history, chief complaint, arrival mode and time, level of acuity at triage, and how these variables affected the ESD disposition.
The setting was the ESD of a licensed 968-bed public teaching hospital in the Southern U.S. with a Level 1 Trauma Center and the second-largest regional burn center in the country. The convenience sample consisted of 110 HIV-infected patients presenting to the ESD during the two-month data collection period. All information collected has been blinded and used in the aggregate to promote sample confidentiality. The study was a descriptive format with retrospective medical record review. Conclusions indicate the need for further research to look at methods for delivery of emergency medical care to HIV-infected individuals to encourage them to be adherent to primary HIV medical care in the ambulatory setting as well as to their medication and treatment plan. One option might be to utilize medical case managers to develop a mutually acceptable plan for HIV medical follow-up and ease the transition from episodic emergency care to ongoing ambulatory care to save money and improve the quality of life of the individuals impacted. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 8
Update on HIV-Related Immigration Laws and What HIV-Positive Americans Need to Know about Traveling Abroad
John A. Nechman,
Attorney at Law, Katine & Nechman, L.L.P., Houston, Texas
This poster addresses the impact on immigrants in the U.S. in light of the January 4, 2010 end to America's 22-year-old bar against travelers and immigrants with HIV. Many HIV-positive immigrants will benefit as a result of this change in the law, but many will not. Some may find themselves in deportation proceedings if they try to file to legalize their status. This program will also focus on issues Americans with HIV should know when working and traveling abroad, especially in countries that continue to discriminate against and persecute people with HIV. This poster is primarily directed towards HIV-positive immigrants and care providers and others who work with them. The program also focuses on HIV-positive Americans planning to travel or work abroad and those care providers who work with them. Understanding how our nation's HIV policies towards the rest of the world as well as what is happening globally on HIV are critical to understanding HIV-related issues in the U.S. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 9
It's Only a Chocolate Chip Cookie: Meeting Patient Needs While Reducing Costs
Charles Robert Smith, L.B.S.W., L.C.D.C.,
Executive Director, Valley AIDS Council, Inc., Harlingen, Texas
Over the years, treatment of HIV infected persons has become increasingly complicated, expensive and time consuming. Thus the development of a model combining the Public Health Service guidelines for HIV care and the Community Behavior Health Model, 1966. Implications are discussed with respect to: meeting the patient's needs, demonstrating a significant decrease in cost of care, increasing access to care and allowing for justification of cost and level of care for any patient at any time utilizing both clinical and behavioral markers. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 10
HIV Staff Training and Technical Assistance: Results from a Provider Survey
Jemel P. Aguilar, M.S.W., Ph.D.,
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work , University of Texas at Austin , Austin, Texas
Jeremy Goldbach, L.M.S.W., C.P.S., Graduate Research Assistant, School of Social Work, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
People living with HIV depend upon many service providers to maintain their health and enhance their quality of life. In addition to medical practitioners, many people living with HIV/AIDS have frequent contact with case managers to assist them with navigating the often-confusing and complicated health and social service systems that provide treatment adherence counseling, assistance accessing housing and transportation services, and other programs. Within the last 10 years, the focus of case management has changed to meet the fluctuating goals of major legislation that funds HIV-related and other healthcare services. Case managers must respond to these changes in their roles as well as continue to meet the needs of their clients. Case managers can update their skills in a particular area and their knowledge about the obstacles facing people living with HIV through continuing education programs or pursing higher education degrees. This poster identifies gaps and solutions to building the capacity of direct care staff in providing services to clients and identifies training needs that, if provided, will strengthen the system of care. Knowledge Level: Beginning

Poster Presentation 11
Key Informant Interviews: Barriers and Facilitators to Effectively Meeting the Mental Health and Substance Abuse Needs of HIV- Infected Individuals in the State of Texas
Michele Rountree, M.S.W., Ph.D.,
Assistant Professor/Principal Investigator, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Jeremy Goldbach, L.M.S.W., C.P.S., Graduate Research Assistant, School of Social Work, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Substance abuse (SA) and mental health (MH) concerns among HIV-positive clients impacts the quality of life and medical adherence of this population. This poster displays a research project conducted to identify the barriers and facilitators to effectively meeting the MH/SA needs of HIV infected individuals in Texas. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 12
A Comparative Analysis of the Factors Influential to the High Rates of Syphilis Infections in the MSM African American and Hispanic Communities of Houston/Harris County
Kevin Anderson,
Popular Opinion Leader/Focus on Youth Facilitator, AIDS Foundation Houston, Houston, Texas
Jose Benito Castro, VOICES/VOCES Facilitator and Health Educator, AIDS Foundation Houston, Houston, Texas
Houston is the fourth largest city in the United States. There are nearly 2.2 million residents in the city. According to a census by Houston Department of Health and Human Services, African Americans make up 18% of the population and Hispanics make up 33% of the population. For 2009, MSMs in the 13-24 and 25-34 age groups had the highest number of reported syphilis cases in Houston/Harris County. Of these groups, 50% were African American and 25% were Hispanic. Factors influencing the high rate of infections according to the CDC were decreased use of condoms, substance abuse, use of the Internet to find sex partners and HIV/AIDS treatment optimism. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 13
Reducing Congenital Syphilis through Social Marketing and Screening
Denita Johnson,
Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Corey Garrett, Houston, Texas
Michael Henley, Houston, Texas
Lupita Thornton, Public Health Investigator Manager, Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS), Houston, Texas
In the first seven months of 2009, surveys were conducted with 16 mothers delivering an infant with a presumptive congenital syphilis diagnosis or delivering a syphilitic stillborn infant. Data analysis from the surveys indicate those who did not seek prenatal care and those mothers who did not know where to seek prenatal service were interested in knowing where to obtain education on prenatal issues and where to seek public prenatal care. Data collected through the survey tool administered to the mothers is being used to determine strategic placement of social marketing tools and to spearhead a collaborative effort with area physicians to increase routine third trimester RPR/TP-PA testing among prenatal patients. Consistent strategic social marketing and routine third trimester RPR testing can be effective methods used to decrease congenital syphilis morbidity in Harris County. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 14
Changing Demographics at an Urban, Community-Based HIV Clinic
Lauren Rogers,
Data Manager, AIDS Arms, Inc., Dallas, Texas
M. Keith Rawlings, M.D., Medical Director and Director of Clinical Research, AIDS Arms, Inc., Peabody Health Center, Dallas, Texas
CDC data shows that the rate of HIV/AIDS infection among persons age =50 is 12 times as high among blacks as compared to whites (51.7 versus 4.2 per 100,000). Despite this, the proportion of the black population has decreased while the white population has increased at the Peabody Health Center. This could be related to several factors such as socioeconomic issues that affect adherence to medical appointments as well as current economic climate driving patients from private medical practices to federally funded clinics. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 15
Acute Hepatitis B Surveillance in Texas
Rachel Wiseman, M.P.H.,
Epidemiologist, Infectious Disease Control Unit, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Kayla Boykins, Infectious Disease Specialist, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Lucille Palenapa, M.S., Program Specialist, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Acute hepatitis B is a reportable condition in Texas. Until 2004, there was not a steady decline in cases of acute hepatitis B in Texas. The incidence of disease in Texas in 2004 was 4 cases per 100,000 population. In 2008, the rate had decreased to 1.1 per 100,000 population, which is a case count of 562. The average age at diagnosis in 2008 was 44 and cases were predominantly male (65.8%). Further analysis of hepatitis B data for recent years will be presented on the poster. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 16
Epidemiology of HIV and AIDS in Bexar County, 2000-2009
Mary Thomas, M.P.H.,
Epidemiologist, San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San Antonio, Texas
Cara J. Hausler, B.S., Epidemiologist and Assistant Program Manager, San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San Antonio, Texas
Domingo J. Navarro, M.B.A., STD/HIV and TB Program, Communicable Disease Program Manager, San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San Antonio, Texas
This poster exhibit will display analysis of the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in Bexar County for a period of 10 years from 2000-2009. It addresses questions of who (sex, race/ethnicity, age) is being diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, how it is being transmitted, what geographic areas are most affected, and how these factors have changed over time. An insight into the HIV-affected local populations in Bexar County may assist decision makers in HIV prevention and plan for their health maintenance and ensure quality of life. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 17
Epidemiology of Syphilis in Bexar County
Cara J. Hausler, B.S.,
Epidemiologist and Assistant Program Manager, San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San Antonio, Texas
Mary Thomas, M.P.H., Epidemiologist, San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San Antonio, Texas
Domingo J. Navarro, M.B.A., STD/HIV and TB Program, Communicable Disease Program Manager, San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San Antonio, Texas
This poster exhibit will display analysis of the epidemiology of syphilis in Bexar County for a period of 10 years from 2000-2009. It addresses questions of who (sex, race/ethnicity, age) is being diagnosed with syphilis, how it is being transmitted, what geographic areas are most affected and how these factors have changed over time. An insight into the local populations with syphilis may assist decision-makers in syphilis prevention and elimination. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 18
Prevention of Congenital Syphilis in Dallas, Texas
Lynne Davis, R.N.,
Staff Nurse, Dallas County Health and Human Services STD Clinic, Dallas, Texas
An increase in the number of congenital syphilis cases in Dallas County resulted in the decision that pregnant women needed increased follow up to assure adequate treatment. Treatment for co-infections was also necessary. The program approach assured that pregnant women presenting to the Dallas County Health and Human Services STD clinic for syphilis treatment receive recommended treatment. One RN is assigned to the task, tracking when each patient is due to return to clinic for treatment and providing reminders when needed.

The poster includes outcomes expected such as a decreased morbidity, not only for congenital syphilis, but for complications from co-infections as well. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 19
10 Years in the Top 10: The State of STIs in Houston/Harris County
Robert Hines, Jr., M.S.P.H.,
Senior Public Health Investigator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Camden J. Hallmark, M.P.H., Epidemiologist, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Amanda Kubala, M.P.H., Epidemiologist Specialist, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Michael Henley, Administrative Supervisor/ STD Surveillance, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
M. Aaron Sayegh, Ph.D., M.P.H., Epidemiologist Manager, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Epidemiology, Houston, Texas
Nationally, the CDC reports that chlamydia and syphilis rates continue to increase, while gonorrhea rates remain stable. Harris County, Texas ranks among the top ten counties in the U.S. in terms of diagnosed and reported cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. In order to prepare for future changes in the prevalence and incidence of these infections, a review of past trends is necessary. The purpose of this project, therefore, is to describe the 1999-2009 epidemiologic profile of bacterial STIs in Harris County, Texas. Knowledge Level: Beginning

Poster Presentation 20
Using GIS Mapping and Surveillance Data to describe Late HIV Diagnoses among the Hispanic population in Houston, Harris County: 2006-2008
Naqi Mohammad, B.S.,
Surveillance Investigator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Marissa Gonzalez, Surveillance Investigator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Biru Yang, Ph.D., M.P.H., Epidemiologist/Biostatistician, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Lei Zhou, Ph.D., M.S., M.A., GIS Analyst, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Shirley Chan, M.P.H., M.T., A.S.C.P., Staff Epidemiologist Specialist/HIV Incidence Surveillance Coordinator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
The Hispanic population represents 38% of the total county makeup in Houston/Harris County, a region where Hispanic persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are 1.86 times more likely to have a late diagnosis of HIV as compared to white, non-Hispanic PLWHAs. Using surveillance data from 2006 to 2008, we will view accessibility to healthcare facilities as compared to residence of diagnosis among the Hispanic late-testers subgroup and identify any variance between the two. We will also look at the availability of healthcare facilities, comparing late and non-late testers to one another. Our findings will help identify access to care issues within the Hispanic late-tester population and their implications to prevention activities. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 21
Progression to AIDS or Death after HIV Diagnosis, Houston/Harris County, Texas, 1999-2008
Karen J. Chronister, Ph.D.,
Epidemiologist Supervisor, HIV/AIDS Surveillance Program, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Jeffrey A. Meyer, M.D., M.P.H., Epidemiologist Supervisor, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
United States health goals aim to decrease death from HIV as well as increase the interval of time between an initial diagnosis of HIV and AIDS and the interval of time until death. The purpose of this study is to determine demographic and risk factors associated with disease progression after an initial HIV diagnosis in Houston/Harris County, Texas, between 1999 and 2008. Using data from Houston's HIV/AIDS Reporting System, we use Kaplan-Meier survival methods to compare the interval of time until AIDS diagnosis or death between groups based on race/ethnicity, sex, age at diagnosis, and transmission category. Findings from this project should be used in combination with existing knowledge to further ensure not only HIV testing, but also linkage to care and adherence to treatment. Understanding characteristics associated with disease progression can identify populations at greater risk of infection and progression to AIDS or death. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 22
Epidemiology of HIV and AIDS in Houston/Harris County
Jeffrey A. Meyer, M.D., M.P.H.,
Epidemiologist Supervisor, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Yvonne Lu, M.D., M.P.H., Epidemiologist Specialist, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Karen J. Chronister, Ph.D., Epidemiologist Supervisor, HIV/AIDS Surveillance Program, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
M. Aaron Sayegh, Ph.D., M.P.H., Epidemiologist Manager, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Epidemiology, Houston, Texas
This poster describes the epidemiology of HIV and AIDS in Houston/Harris County Texas. Graphs and tables are presented showing trends in AIDS and HIV cases and the current proportion of new cases by sex, race, age and transmission risk factor. A map is presented showing the geographic distribution of new HIV cases. Slides [Slideshare] Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 23
Fight HIV: A Social Marketing Response to the HIV/AIDS Disparity Among African Americans in Dallas
Gregory W. Beets, M.A.,
HIV/STD Public Information Coordinator, Health Communication and Community Engagement Group, TB/HIV/STD Unit, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
In 2008, the Department of State Health Services' HIV/STD Program contracted with Austin-based ad agency EnviroMedia to launch the “Fight HIV” awareness campaign to reach African Americans in Dallas. Based on input from focus groups and interviews, campaign messages were localized to the Dallas area and a partnership was formed with KwanzaaFest to provide the campaign with an outreach component. Radio, transit, newspaper and web banner ads promoted the availability of free HIV testing at KwanzaaFest, which helped to double the number of persons tested at the event from the previous year. This presentation describes the campaign's development, execution, results and lessons learned. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 24
Current to Future Organizational Structure
Sylvia Moreno, B.S.N., R.N.,
Director of Nursing-HIV, Parkland Health and Hospital System, Dallas, Texas
Organizations must determine critical categories for smart goal development. This is a common set of goals that are linked to the vision and strategic plan. The goals cascade into areas of responsibility. Setting and attaining the goals through these categories sets up continual improvement at all levels of the organization. Goal reporting processes should include monthly goal review with direct reports and quarterly formal review with senior leadership. This poster will illustrate this process. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 25
Implementation of Peer Review Process has Proven to be an Effective Quality Control and Improvement Tool
Eduardo Marez, A.S.,
Quality Improvement Monitor, AIDS Arms, Inc., Dallas, Texas
Del Wilson, AIDS Arms, Inc., Dallas, Texas
Jennifer Klein, AIDS Arms, Inc, Dallas, Texas
M. Keith Rawlings, M.D., Medical Director and Director of Clinical Research, AIDS Arms, Inc., Peabody Health Center, Dallas, Texas
The peer review process provides a 100% review of progress notes and units of service against established standards. This process has specific ground rules with the number one rule being confidentiality. The peer review has resulted in an overall decrease in missing progress notes with an increase in notes written to current standards. Within the past two years, the percentage of questioned items has fallen from 20% to 5% in addition to the agency's fiscal and programmatic audits improving for case management service categories. Slides [Slideshare] Knowledge Level: Beginning

Poster Presentation 26
Leader, Leader, Who is the Leader?|
James S. Bissett Jr., B.S., M.B.A.,
Program Specialist II, Department of State Health Services, Lubbock, Texas
This poster presents information aimed at increasing the prevalence of effective leadership in supervision and management which in turn will yield a more effective and efficient program. The program normally consists of employees, supervisor, team lead, and a program manager. Some agencies that have a failure in leadership increase micro-management which is even more detrimental to a program, thus increasing inefficiency and ineffective disease intervention.

The implications of an effective leadership component are discussed in terms of efficiency and effectiveness, morale, satisfaction, and teambuilding. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 27
Building an Effective and Skilled Prevention Team
Mike McKay, M.P.A.,
Executive Director, Resource Center Dallas, Dallas, Texas
Bret Camp, R.T., A.R.R.T., Associate Executive Director, Health and Medical Services, Resource Center Dallas, Dallas, Texas
Ruben Ramirez, M.A., Community Health Programs Manager, Resource Center Dallas, Dallas, Texas
Resource Center Dallas has a widely recognized and effective HIV/STD prevention program, but admittedly that has not always been the case. The top three leaders of the organization's team will discuss and describe specific actions and ideas for taking a program from probation to success by building an effective and skilled team. Information presented will include effective leadership skills and organizational structures to, creating a culture for teamwork; strategies to improve management and development of staff; manage funds, budget and grants; and leverage other funds for their teams. Implications of effective teams within an HIV/STD prevention organization are discussed in terms of increased productivity and emotional and practical assistance on the job. Also, workgroups or teams share information more freely and engage in creative problem solving for the entire organization. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 28 (Research Track)
Creating Age-Adjusted Maps of HIV/AIDS Burdens in Texas
Chetan Tiwari, Ph.D.,
Assistant Professor, University of North Texas, Department of Geography, Denton, Texas
Joseph R. Oppong, Ph.D., Professor of Geography, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Bink Ruckthongsook, Student, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Disease maps for comparing HIV/AIDS burdens between different geographical regions or time periods may present a misleading picture if the underlying differences in the age-sex structures of the populations being mapped are ignored. Although age-adjusted choropleth maps are commonly used to represent disease burdens (such as those of HIV/AIDS), they are created using predefined administrative boundaries such as census tracks or blocks that are often unrelated to the disease itself. We present a kernel density estimation method for producing spatially continuous, age-adjusted maps of HIV/AIDS burdens in Texas. The new method is applied to HIV/AIDS cases reported in Texas ZIP codes during 1999-2008 obtained from DSHS. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 29 (Research Track)
Understanding Causes of Hospitalization Among Newly Diagnosed HIV Patients in Houston, Texas
Lokesh Shahani, M.D., M.P.H.,
Resident, Department of Internal Medicine and Psychiatry, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois
Thomas Giordano M.D., M.P.H., Houston Center for Quality of Care and Utilization Studies, Houston VA Medical Center, Houston, Texas
More than a quarter of patients with HIV in the United States are diagnosed in hospital, settings most often with advanced HIV-related conditions. There has been little research done on the causes of hospitalization when the patients are first diagnosed with HIV. Our study shows that HIV-related causes, especially pneumocystis pneumonia and other respiratory processes, account for many hospitalizations when patients are first diagnosed with HIV. Many of these HIV-related hospitalizations could have been prevented if patients were diagnosed early and linked to medical care. Routine testing for HIV infection to promote early HIV diagnosis can prevent significant morbidity and mortality. Programs to increase HIV awareness need to be an integral part of activities aimed at control of spread of HIV in the community. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 30 (Research Track)
Spatial Clusters of HIV Infection by Mode of Transmission in Texas
Sonia Arbona, Ph.D.,
Medical Geographer, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Praveen R. Pannala, M.D., M.P.H., Medical Epidemiologist, Information and Projects Group, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Sharon K. Melville, M.D., M.P.H., Manager, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Risks for HIV transmission are not distributed uniformly across populations. In order to characterize the geographical clustering of HIV infections by mode of transmission in Texas, the authors used surveillance data on people living with HIV/AIDS through the end of 2008. Cases were aggregated by residential ZIP code and the spatial scan statistic was applied to identify the locations of clusters. The results suggest that clustering of HIV infections occurs in communities within urban environments, and different HIV transmission risks overlap in these communities. Geographic approaches to studying the HIV epidemic have a role in the development of prevention strategies. Slides [Slideshare] Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 31 (Research Track)
Neighborhood Characteristics and HIV/AIDS in Texas
Joseph R. Oppong, Ph.D.,
Professor of Geography, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Chetan Tiwari, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of North Texas, Department of Geography, Denton, Texas
While the U.S. South is known to have much higher HIV/AIDS rates than the rest of the country, the considerable spatial variation in occurrence within the region has not been adequately documented. Much research has been conducted at the state and county level understandably due to data limitations, ignoring the considerable intra-regional variations that are more critical for planning interventions. Within the South, the need for examination of HIV/AIDS rates at finer spatial scales is paramount. Moreover, the drivers and characteristics of HIV/AIDS regarding leading modes of exposure, gender, and race/ethnic distribution vary spatially and among different age groups such as youth 13-24 and adults aged 50 and over. In short, neighborhood characteristics influence HIV/AIDS prevalence and risk. Yet intervention strategies rarely address them. This study examines how neighborhood characteristics including social disorganization such as migration, crime and incarceration rates, and scarcity of safe and affordable housing vary with HIV/AIDS rates. It also examines the spatial patterns of such characteristics as dominant mode of exposure, race/ethnicity and gender breakdown. Knowledge Level: Advanced

Poster Presentation 32 (Research Track)
Late Testers and HIV/AIDS in Texas ZIP Codes
Jody Huddleston,
Undergraduate at the University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Joseph R. Oppong, Ph.D., Professor of Geography, University of North Texas , Denton, Texas
HIV positive people who are unaware of their status are unable to take advantage of current treatments, may continue to participate in high-risk behaviors exposing others, and are thus more likely to transmit the disease. Consequently, early diagnosis is critically important for both the health of the individual and the prevention of further spread. Determining the geographic distribution and characteristics of areas in Texas with high rates of late testers may be useful in targeting intervention efforts. Knowledge Level: Beginning

Poster Presentation 33 (Research Track)
Prevalence of Chlamydia Among Male Partners of Female Diagnosed Patients
Julia C. Kuhn, R.N., M.S.,
STD Nurse Clinician, Dallas County Health and Human Services, Dallas, Texas
In the Dallas County STD clinic, clinicians see many pregnant females or post-partum females who have been diagnosed with chlamydia at their gynecologic clinic. In treating these patients along with their partners, many questions arise as to how the couple got chlamydia when both partners deny sexual contact with other partners. Results of the prevalence research show that approximately half of the male partners tested negative for chlamydia. These results suggest that at least some instances of chlamydia may be false positive results and raise questions as to possible other explanations for a positive chlamydia test. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 34 (Research Track)
Sources of Sexuality Related Information Among College Students
Andrea L. DeMaria, M.S.,
Graduate Student, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas
Ariane V. Hollub, Ph.D., C.H.E.S., O.T.R., Assistant Professor, Division of Health Education, Department of Health and Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas
According to CDC, the incidence of STDs and HIV remains problematic across various regions of the United States, particularly among those aged 15 to 24 years. Research indicates college students, which are captured within this age range, are most likely to obtain their sexuality information from either parents or peers. This study aimed to identify the most frequent sources today's college students utilize to obtain sexual information, the most common searched sexual topics, as well as capture the perceived reliability of sexual information sources. Implications for intervention development are discussed. Knowledge Level: Advanced

Poster Presentation 35 (Research Track)
The Impact of Prison Facilities on the HIV/AIDS Rate in the General Public: A Geographical Study
Libbey C. Kutch, B.A.,
Student, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Joseph R. Oppong, Ph.D., Professor of Geography, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Chetan Tiwari, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of North Texas, Department of Geography, Denton, Texas
This paper investigates the relationship between the spatial distribution of HIV/AIDS and the location and size of Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) prison facilities in Texas communities. This study aims to answer the problematic questions, is there evidence to suggest that the locations of prison facilities affect the HIV/AIDS rate of non-incarcerated residents, and is there evidence to suggest that the prison system is fueling the spread of HIV/AIDS in the general population? Is living within in the communities closest to prison units an unmentioned or undiscovered risk-factor for HIV/AIDS? Knowledge Level: Beginning

Poster Presentation 36 (Research Track)
Racial Differences in Risk Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Houston
Hafeez Ur Rehman, M.D., M.P.H., C.P.H.,
Epidemiologist Specialist, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Karen Chronister, Ph.D., Epidemiologist Supervisor, HIV/AIDS Surveillance Program, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Marcia Wolverton, M.P.H., Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
In Houston/Harris County over 38% of the newly diagnosed HIV cases are attributed to male to male (MSM) sexual contact from 1999 to 2009. In an attempt to understand the transmission of disease through MSM, HDHHS used the 2008 Behavioral Surveillance data to analyze the demographics and high-risk behaviors among different races. Significant differences in risk behaviors and demographic characteristics exist between White, African American, and Hispanic MSM. An insight into the differences in risk behaviors among MSM will help prevention programs to target specific behaviors in different races. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 37 (Research Track)
Chlamydia Screening: Further Experience in a Charter School Setting
Diane Rainosek, R.N., M.S.N., P.N.P.,
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, People's Community Clinic, Austin, Texas
Jennifer Curtiss, M.Ed., Texas IPP Coordinator, Center for Health Training, Austin, Texas
Celia Neavel, M.D., F.S.A.M., Asst. Prof. UTSW Pediatric Education Program; Director, Center for Adolescent Health, People's Community Clinic, Austin, Texas
Asymptomatic chlamydia infections are an important health problem in adolescents, disproportionately affecting minority youth. In the state of Texas, 80% of the more than 90,000 charter school students are minority youth. A non-profit community clinic, a local charter school, and the state Infertility Prevention Project collaborated in providing a mass single-day screening of students for chlamydia and gonorrhea using urine based testing, followed by timely results and treatment. Overall positivity for chlamydia for the 104 students was 10.6%, a finding similar to a 10% positivity rate noted in our previous study done two years before in this same school setting. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Poster Presentation 38 (Research Track)
Condom Use in Post Menopausal Women
Alexis Rose, M.S.W.,
Research Assistant, Graduate College of Social Work, University of Houston, Houston, Texas
According to CDC, older adults (over the age of 50) encompass 15% of all new HIV/AIDS cases in the U.S. The decision to have a partner use a condom by older women is confounded by many factors like social demographics, knowledge, attitude, medical experience, and partner's attitude. This study seeks to understand the factors that impact that decision to use a condom as well as the ability to use one if needed. Knowledge Level: Intermediate 

Poster Presentation 39
“Do you know where that's been?”
Devon House,
Student, Communication Studies in Human Relations, University of Texas, Austin, Texas
Three health communication students developed this poster to illustrate the need to focus at the relationship level in discussing condom negotiation and sexual health history disclosure between college students. The students developed a full color comic book to appeal to an older adolescent audience.

Poster Presentation 40
Test Texas HIV Coalition: Making opt-out HIV Testing Routine in Health Care Settings
Brian Rosemond, B.B.A., B.S.N., R.N.,
Program Specialist V, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Isabel Clark, M.A., R.D., Program Specialist V, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
The Test Texas HIV Coalition promotes HIV screening for patients ages 13 to 64 in all healthcare settings in order to address the persistently high estimates of undiagnosed or late-diagnosed HIV infection in Texas. In compliance with the CDC's 2006 Revised Recommendations for HIV Testing of Adults, Adolescents, and Pregnant Women in Healthcare Settings, the Coalition's mission is to make opt-out HIV testing routine in Texas by 2014.


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Last updated February 22, 2011