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    DSHS HIV/STD Program

    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, Texas 78714

    Phone: (512) 533-3000

    E-mail the HIV/STD Program

    E-mail data requests to HIV/STD Program - This email can be used to request data and statistics on HIV, TB, and STDs in Texas. It cannot be used to get treatment or infection history for individuals, or to request information on programs and services. Please do not include any personal, identifying health information in your email such as HIV status, Date of Birth, Social Security Number, etc.

    For treatment/testing history, please contact your local Health Department.

    For information on HIV testing and services available to Persons Living with HIV and AIDS, please contact your local HIV services organization.

17th Texas HIV-STD Conference Roundtable Discussions

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Wednesday, May 26, 2010

3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Grand Ballroom A

Round Table 1
How to Manage a Program That Uses Evidence-Based Interventions
Daniel Casillas,
Program Coordinator, Capacity Building Assistance Center at UT Southwestern, Dallas, Texas
Community-based organizations are funded to implement Evidence-Based Interventions (EBI) that require significant planning and preparation for successful implementation. This discussion will focus on identifying some of the key aspects to managing an EBI, such as developing an implementation plan, recruitment and retention, evaluation and quality assurance. The moderator will explore key challenges to managing EBIs and how to access assistance to support an agency to build capacity to implement and sustain programs. Knowledge Level: Beginning/Intermediate

Round Table 2
Reevaluating Efforts Aimed at Contacting High Risk Populations (REACH): Effective Methods for Targeting Populations of MSM
Michele Durham, M.Ed.,
Executive Director, BEAT-AIDS, San Antonio, Texas
Charles Whitehead, HIV Prevention Director, BEAT-AIDS, San Antonio, Texas
Men who have sex with men (MSM), especially young MSM of color, can be harder to reach with prevention messages because of stigma of HIV and homophobia. This prevention team will discuss its successes with an Internet outreach program targeting an often over-looked population of high-risk MSM. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 3
Making HIV Testing Routine in Texas
Jenny McFarlane,
Routine HIV Testing and Perinatal Prevention Coordinator, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Mary Chapman McIntosh, M.Ed., Test Texas Project Coordinator, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
We estimate that about 15,000 Texans are infected with HIV but do not know it. Many are not diagnosed until late in the progression of the disease. Because they are diagnosed late, these individuals have lived for many years without the knowledge of status that triggers behavior change and without the life-extending treatment that could lower viral load and reduce transmission. In order to increase the identification of infected persons, the DSHS HIV program promotes and supports an expanded HIV testing model in accordance with CDC recommended guidelines in addition to traditional targeted testing. The moderators will describe and discuss expanded testing activities that encourage routine opt-out testing in clinical settings. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 4
Importance of Teen Peer Educators – Awareness, Leadership, Commitment and Development
Allison Booker Brooks,
Director of Teen and Adult Services, YWCA Greater Houston, Houston, Texas
Robert Thurmond, Certified Trainer of Trainers, (PHES), Hepatitis Master Trainer, Program Management for Youth based Risk Reduction Implementations, Assistant Director of Teen and Young Adult Programs YWCA Greater Houston, Houston, Texas
YWCA educates, trains and develops peer-to-peer educators to empower young people to make healthy, life-sustaining decisions. The YWCA's peer-to-peer educators are clients who have participated and completed risk reduction curricula in the Health Initiative Project Healthy Option for People study (HIPHOP). They are responsible for developing workshops, summits and real talk conversations (round tables) with the expectation of decreasing STD infections within Harris County and Greater Houston. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 5
Women 4 Women: HIV Prevention for Latina Women Attending Hispanic Serving Institutions
Catarina Dominguez, M.A.,
Adjunct Faculty Counselor, Women's Center – San Antonio College, San Antonio, Texas
Anita Swayze, B.A., Program Manager, Center for Health Training, Austin, Texas
There is a current lack of comprehensive HIV prevention curricula available focused on college-age Hispanic females. Elements of a comprehensive intervention for this underserved population include information on cultural, social and environmental influences that affect decision-making and health behaviors. Other pertinent topics include female health care and HIV/STD information combined with skill building activities to promote healthy decision-making. Knowledge Level: Advanced

Round Table 6
DSHS HIV Prevention Conversation
Jeff Hitt, M.Ed.,
Manager, HIV/STD Prevention and Intervention Services Group, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Dolores Alvarez, Targeted Prevention and Interventions Team, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
The HIV epidemic has changed over the last 2 decades and our prevention efforts must respond proactively. This roundtable will be an opportunity for interested parties to discuss DSHS HIV Prevention philosophy and mission. We will discuss future directions, ideas, and plans from the DSHS HIV/STD program perspective, invite local perspectives, and assess the prevention landscape in terms of federal directions.

Round Table 7
Boosting Participant Recruitment and Retention
Cora E. Giddens, B.A., B.S.,
Project Manager, Healthy Relationships, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas
Many prevention programs implementing group-level interventions experience difficulty recruiting and retaining participants due to a number of external or structural factors. Ongoing recruitment efforts are needed, especially around removal of barriers to participation. Adaptation to make the intervention more appropriate for and appealing to potential participants is crucial to both recruitment and retention. Retention is largely dependent on the skill of the facilitators. The moderator will explore external and structural factors that influence participation in group-level interventions. Handouts [Slideshare] Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 8
Health Education in Texas: The Law, School Health Advisory Councils and What You Can Do
Ginny Barr, L.M.S.W.,
Manager, School Health Programs, Texas Education Agency, Austin, Texas
Health education in Texas schools can be a complicated issue. This session will review what the actual guidelines are for schools and how School Health Advisory Councils are an important part of the process that you can be involved with. We will provide guidelines, data and tools for getting involved. Improving health education in Texas schools is an important step in educating and preventing HIV and STDs in the Texas population. Knowledge Level: Beginning

Round Table 9
Mobilizing Communities for the Health of Black Gay, Bisexual, and Same-Gender Loving Men
Terrance E. Moore,
Associate Director, Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors, Washington, D.C.
All Texas communities have a shared responsibility to improve the health of Black gay, bisexual, and same-gender loving men. This round table discussion will present identified needs of the community and strategies for addressing them. Discussion will provide opportunity for conference participants to learn what is occurring in Texas for Black gay and same-gender loving men and contribute to the conversation of what remains to be done for national and state policy change, community mobilization and individual action. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 10
Addressing the Spiritual Needs of HIV-Positive African American Women with Co-morbid Disorders: An Opportunity for Culturally Competent Services
Ratonia C. Runnels, L.M.S.W.,
Doctoral Student/Research Assistant, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Attention to the mental health status of HIV-positive African American women and available services i s warranted due to associations between higher levels of psychological distress, lower quality of life, HIV disease progression and poor treatment. For many HIV-positive African American women, treatment of HIV infection and the subsequent psychological stress is complicated by lack of resources and competing life priorities. These women face additional challenges such as fear of disclosure and lack of adequate social support. The multiple challenges faced by African American women who are HIV-positive highlight the need to explore their preferred and helpful ways of coping. Knowledge Level: Advanced

Round Table 11
Quality Improvement
Kathleen Clanon, M.D.,
NQC Consultant, National Quality Center, Oakland, California
Continuous Quality Improvement is a requirement of Ryan White and other federal grant programs, and also a growing movement in medical care. How can it be done in clinical and support agencies in a way that is useful, effective and not just busy-work? The moderator will use examples and demonstrate use of a simple quality improvement tool to serve as a starting point for a frank and tough-minded discussion about the challenges and opportunities of improvement work in the real world. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 12
Innovations in Providing Oral Health Services to HIV Positive Persons
Nancy Young, L.C.D.C.,
Special Projects Director, Special Health Resources for Texas, Inc., Longview, Texas
Ernesto Guevara, Oral Health Case Manager, Special Health Resources for Texas, Inc., Longview, Texas
This round table discussion will include research data on HIV-positive persons receiving oral health care services. By measuring health care indicators such as CD4 and viral load, the importance of oral health care interventions will be demonstrated. We will discuss the implications for HIV/STD prevention, treatment, and/or care services as well as the implications for the overall health of HIV-positive persons. Knowledge Level: Beginning

Round Table 13
HIV Care Coordination in New York City: An Evidence-Based Medical Case Management Protocol
Beau J. Mitts, M.P.H.,
Project Manager, Care Coordination, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Bureau of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control Care, Treatment and Housing Program, New York, New York
Approximately 60,000 HIV-infected New York City residents receive medical care in the city in a given year. Of new diagnoses, approximately 25% enter care late and close to half do not receive the minimum standard of HIV primary care. The NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) has implemented an evidence-based medical case management program to improve access to care and health outcomes. This discussion will focus on the following aspects of this intervention: outreach for return to care, health system navigation, accompaniment, coaching, health promotion, a structured health curriculum, facilitated linkage to social support services, and information exchange with HIV primary care providers. The moderator will explore implementation challenges generated from an initial lack of support from the community since this protocol represents a major shift from the previously existing service delivery. Also discussed will be the strategic role that health departments must play in successfully implementing evidence-based interventions in care and treatment programs by obtaining buy-in from HIV providers, providing technical assistance, and monitoring these programs. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 14
Capacity Building Project to Serve the Mental Health and Substance Abuse Needs of HIV-Infected Persons in Texas: Analysis of Previous HIV Jurisdictions/Providers Needs Assessments
Michele A. Rountree, M.S.W., Ph.D.,
Assistant Professor/Principal Investigator, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Ratonia C. Runnels, L.M.S.W., Doctoral Student/Research Assistant, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Joy Learman, M.S.S.W., Doctoral Student/Research Assistant, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
A sample of eight administrative agents' comprehensive HIV needs assessment reports were identified and examined for similarities and differences relative to meeting the substance abuse and mental health needs of HIV infected individuals in Texas. Results included: rankings or percentages to identification of service gaps, unmet client needs and barriers to service. Using the SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analytical framework, several themes emerged. The most prominent themes were gaps in the continuum of care related to access, delivery and utilization of services. In general, providers and clients rank substance abuse and mental health services as a priority. However, several administrative areas report having difficulty providing mental health and substance abuse services in all geographic areas with the growing prevalence of HIV. Moreover, through the process of conducting a document analysis on the mental health and substance abuse services in the eight administrative areas, it became evident that each administrative area employed different strategies and methods in conducting their respective needs assessments. Accordingly, these differences made compilation and comparison of information more cumbersome and less reliable. The uniformity of the needs assessments is recommended to facilitate future analyses. Handouts [Slideshare] Knowledge Level: Beginning

Round Table 15
Houston STD Program Mobile Clinic Strategy: Reaching Underserved Populations with Evidence Based Intervention and Cost Effective Clinical Services
Michael Thomas, B.S., M.P.H.,
Mobile Clinic Coordinator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services Bureau of HIV/STD Prevention and Viral Hepatitis
STD programs are challenged to deliver evidence-based, cost-effective intervention activities that successfully reach underserved populations. The moderator will describe how the Houston STD program utilizes mobile clinics to conduct case-related screening and targeted outreach screening activities that are cost effective and positively impact program performance. Cost analysis between mobile clinics and traditional outreach activities were compared and implications discussed with respect to implications for HIV/STD prevention, treatment, and/or care services. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 16
Innovation in Public Health: STD Testing at the Magistrate's Detention Facility
Domingo J. Navarro, M.B.A.,
STD/HIV and TB Program, Communicable Disease Program Manager, San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San Antonio, Texas
In public health, new venues and methods have to be identified to reach high-risk populations. Many individuals do not know that they may have an STD or possibly HIV infection. In September 2008, a new STD testing initiative was proposed for the San Antonio Magistrate's Detention Center. Meetings were held with various detention center administrative staff to discuss STD testing at their location. The discussions resulted in an STD testing initiative. At the project start, testing was slow. Now many incarcerated individuals waiting for their court hearing request to be tested for STDs. The moderator will explore and share ideas on how to start new testing initiatives and address challenges that may arise for others. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 17
HPV: How It Can Affect You
Rachel Lowry, R.N.,
Dallas County Health and Human Services, Dallas, Texas
Human papillomavirus, also known as HPV, is the most common STI. It can affect many areas of the body, including cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal and oral tissue. This discussion will also address treatments available, how HPV is diagnosed and the current vaccines available. Knowledge Level: Beginning

Round Table 18
Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Sexually Transmitted Disease
Larry Cuellar,
Texas Adult Viral Hepatitis Coordinator, Health Communication and Community Engagement Group, TB/HIV/STD Unit, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
LaQueisa Wilson, M.S., Training Specialist IV, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
The HIV/STD Surveillance Annual Report for 2008 shows that African Americans and Hispanics make up a high percentage of reported cases of syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia in Texas. Round table participants will review epidemiological data regarding the high number of syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia cases in the African American and Hispanic communities of Texas. The facilitators will then guide the group in discussing possible social and environmental factors related to the disparity. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 19
Issues, Challenges and Recommended Solutions in Recruiting and Interviewing Multi-Cultural Population of HIV/AIDS Patients
Lydwina Anderson,
Surveillance Investigator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Karen Miller, Surveillance Investigator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
This round table discussion will focus on the issues and challenges faced in locating, recruiting, tracking and interviewing multi-cultural HIV/AIDS patients receiving care in outpatient clinics. Recognizing the socio-economic and cultural diversity of the target client populations, the session will also discuss the use of culturally sensitive approach to track and interview patients. Finally, the discussion will explore approaches taken to maintain the methodological rigor of survey evaluation, which includes adapting a flexible interview protocol, maintaining the objectivity of the interviewer, preserving independence of the interviewer from job roles, and protecting client confidentiality, among others. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 20
Online Partner Notifications for the State of Texas
Tamika R. Martin, M.P.H., C.H.E.S.,
Senior Public Health Investigator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of HIV/STD/Viral Hepatitis Prevention, Houston, Texas
Health departments nationwide are embracing new technology while finding innovative ways to combat disease transmission. The Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS) Bureau of HIV/STD and Viral Hepatitis Prevention has been actively conducting Internet partner notification for Houston since 2005. In 2008, HDHHS began conducting Internet partner notifications for other prevention programs and county health departments throughout Texas. HDHHS has established an Internet Partner Specialist (IPS), trained as a disease intervention specialist to: research and identify websites frequented by MSM; notify, evaluate and refer patients for treatment; act as a liaison with DSHS, and establish protocols to provide public health follow-up for health departments statewide that are unable to perform these services due to local policy restrictions. Handouts [Slideshare] Knowledge Level: Advanced

Round Table 21
Socio-Ecological Modeling
Nell Gottlieb, Ph.D.,
Professor, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Karol Kaye Harris, Ph.D., Researcher, University of Texas at Austin, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, Austin, Texas
Multi-level interventions are necessary to effectively prevent HIV transmission. This roundtable will focus on the socio-ecologic model and its application in HIV prevention. After presentation of the model, the group will discuss an example of a comprehensive intervention approach using the model and the implications of the model for participants' prevention programming. Knowledge Level: Beginning

Round Table 22
Cultural Proficiency
Alfonso Carlon, B.A.,
Project Director, Center for Health Training, Austin, Texas
Addressing organizational cultural proficiency on an ongoing basis assures that the services, programs and resources are accessible and meaningful to all clients regardless of their linguistic and cultural background. The discussion will focus on the importance of conducting routine assessments of the organization's systems, and how to stage those recommendations to assure that the organization remains responsive to the ever-changing needs of staff, clients and the larger community. Knowledge Level: Advanced

Round Table 23
How Do I Manage to Manage
Dr. Phil Farmer, L.M.S.W.,
Executive Director, Special Health Resources for Texas, Inc., Longview, Texas
This presentation will discuss issues of leadership styles, supervision and management in the context of non-profit organizations. Ethics and ethical management and supervision will also be addressed as will ideas for personnel policies and procedures. Primary focus will be on specific leadership and supervisory skills. These principles will be discussed within the confines of an HIV/AIDS and health care service provider setting. Knowledge Level: Intermediate

Round Table 24
ADAP/SPAP Medication Assistance
Katherine Wells, M.P.H.,
Special Projects Manager, Texas HIV Medication Program, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Becky Ruiz, B.S.W., Client Services Coordinator, Texas HIV Medication Program, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
This round table will provide an opportunity for conference attendees to ask questions about the Texas HIV Medication Program (THMP). Personnel who assist individuals in applying for the THMP are encouraged to attend. Knowledge Level: Beginning

Round Table 25
Homegrown Interventions
Christina Morse Edgar, M.S.,
HIV Prevention Consultant, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Jeff Wagers, Program Specialist, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Homegrown prevention strategies can be a more flexible way for your organization to reach those populations in your community that aren't reached or are nearly impossible to reach by traditional interventions. Think about the possibilities if you could invent your own intervention and try it out and see how it works in your area! Come to the round table and we'll talk about ideas, plans and dreams for these unique intervention opportunities. Handouts [Slideshare]


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Last updated February 22, 2011