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    DSHS HIV/STD Program

    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, Texas 78714

    Phone: (512) 533-3000

    E-mail the HIV/STD Program

    E-mail data requests to HIV/STD Program - This email can be used to request data and statistics on HIV, TB, and STDs in Texas. It cannot be used to get treatment or infection history for individuals, or to request information on programs and services. Please do not include any personal, identifying health information in your email such as HIV status, Date of Birth, Social Security Number, etc.

    For treatment/testing history, please contact your local Health Department.

    For information on HIV testing and services available to Persons Living with HIV and AIDS, please contact your local HIV services organization.

17th Texas HIV-STD Conference Agenda Tuesday Morning

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Program of Events, Tuesday, May 25, 2010

7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Plaza Registration A General Registration
7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Plaza Registration B On-Site Registration and Exhibitor Check-In
7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Lobby Registration Continuing Education Registration
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Atrium InSpot and Online Course Demonstration
12 noon to 5:00 p.m. The Arbor Exhibits
12 noon to 5:00 p.m. Rio Grande A Poster Presentation Preview
12 noon to 5:00 p.m. Rio Grande B AIDS Quilt and Focus on Living Exhibit
24 Hours Guadalupe Internet Café


Mini-Plenary Sessions

T1 - VHARS and the Impact on HIV Incidence: A National Perspective
Joseph Prejean, Ph.D.,
Incidence and Viral Resistance Team - HIV Incidence and Case Surveillance Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Wedgewood Room

Knowledge Level: Beginner
This presentation will provide an overview of the two newest components of national HIV surveillance-HIV Incidence Surveillance and Variant, Atypical, and Resistant HIV Surveillance. It will describe the operations of the systems, methods of analysis and the most recent findings.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Contrast traditional HIV incidence surveillance with HIV VARHS surveillance


T2 - Greater Than AIDS: Confronting the AIDS Crisis in Black America
Stephen Massey,
Associate Director, Entertainment Media Partnerships, Kaiser Family Foundation, Menlo Park, California
Marvelyn Brown, Author and HIV Consultant, Marvelous Connections, New York, New York
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Ballroom B

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Today in the United States, more than half a million Black Americans are living with HIV/AIDS – far surpassing any other racial or ethnic group. From the outset, Blacks have been disproportionately affected by the disease – accounting for nearly half of all new HIV infections every year in the U.S. while representing just 12 percent of the population. Last year, leading U.S. media companies launched Greater Than AIDS – a new coordinated national movement to mobilize Black Americans in response to the domestic AIDS crisis and promote specific calls-to-action to prevent and reduce the further spread of HIV. By stressing unity, hope, and empowerment, Greater Than AIDS seeks to inspire each and every one of us – in our relationships, families, and communities -- to do our part to stem HIV/AIDS. As part of the national campaign, major media companies are working together to distribute Greater Than AIDS public service ads and related content across television, radio, print, outdoor and online platforms. State and local health departments and AIDS offices across the country – including in Texas – are developing targeted efforts under Greater Than AIDS to reach priority groups and local populations. Corporate partners are also helping to cross promote and extend the reach of the media campaign.

This session will highlight Greater Than AIDS and present ways that the campaign's message can be extended into local communities, clinics, and schools. Come witness a dynamic panel, including a young activist living with HIV/AIDS, and engage in an honest discussion about HIV/AIDS, critical lifestyle issues, and the push to end this epidemic.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three ways in which social marketing methods can increase the perceived benefits of and decrease the perceived barriers to behavior change
  • Describe at least three ways in which social media can be used to promote HIV/STD prevention and treatment


T3 - The Impact of Incarceration and Sentencing Disparity
Robert E. Fullilove, Ed.D.,
Associate Dean for Community and Minority Affairs, Professor of Clinical Sociomedical Sciences
Co-Director, Community Research Group, Co-Director, Urbanism and Community Health in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University, New York, New York
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Ballroom A

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Dr. Robert Fullilove of Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health has reviewed extensive data and observes that HIV rates in both urban and (mostly Southern) rural Black communities are a function of the same forces that create residential segregation, the concentration of poverty in segregated communities and the geographical concentration of health disparities. This presentation will focus specifically on the impact of incarceration and sentencing disparities as related to health disparities, and specifically HIV.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and explain how to address social and environmental influences on health behavior


T4 - HIV-Related Stigma
John B. Pryor, Ph.D.,
Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Pecos Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
One of the problems in understanding the role of stigma in the HIV epidemic is that the term “stigma” is used in different ways with different meanings. In this presentation, classic uses of the term stigma will be reviewed and then a contemporary conceptual model of stigma will be presented. This model identifies four different manifestations stigma: public stigma, self-stigma, stigma-by-association, and institutional (structural) stigma. Each of these manifestations of stigma will be explained with regard to the HIV epidemic. Some illustrative studies of stigma will be presented. Finally, some studies of interventions designed to reduce stigma will be described along with a discussion of the common elements found in effective interventions.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

Identify and explain how to address social and environmental influences on health behavior


T5 - Facing the Future of HIV and STD in Texas: Epidemiology, Impact, and Priorities
Nita Ngo, M.P.H.,
Epidemiologist, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Ann S. Robbins, Ph.D., Manager, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Ed Weckerly, M.S., Epidemiologist, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Wedgewood Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
The Department of State Health Services TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch monitors the HIV/AIDS and STD epidemics in Texas through the routine collection of HIV/AIDS and STD surveillance data in order to provide timely and accurate data. This data is used as the foundation from which quality prevention and services planning should be based. This plenary session will first provide a general overview of the current epidemiology of HIV/AIDS and STDs in Texas, including HIV/AIDS data on sex, race and risk, as well as epidemiologic data on syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea. Second, the session will discuss the implications of the data in light of current and future trends in public health. Social networks, community factors and issues of access to testing, care and unmet need will be discussed. Linking prevention and intervention to targeted groups and the role of technology as well as the possible implications of health care reform will be covered.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the current epidemiology of HIV in Texas
  • Describe the current epidemiology of chlamydia in Texas
  • Describe the current epidemiology of gonorrhea in Texas
  • Describe the current epidemiology of syphilis in Texas
  • Describe two implications of epidemiological data for program planning


T6 - Using the Internet to Develop HIV Prevention Interventions
Anne Bowen, Ph.D.,
Professor, Psychology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Ballroom B

Knowledge Level: Beginner
This presentation will provide an overview of developing, implementing and evaluating an Internet intervention to reduce HIV sexual risk behaviors. Specifically, the Wyoming Rural AIDS Prevention Project (WRAPP) focused on issues for rural MSM and was one of the first Internet-delivered interventions to reduce HIV risk. The presentation will provide an overview of different public health and behavioral theories used to develop the intervention and the lessons learned in implanting and evaluating the intervention. Areas covered will include recruiting and retaining participants, detecting frauds, intervention outcome and ideas for the future.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two best practices for effectively focusing HIV prevention efforts on communities at risk
  • Describe two best practices for developing, adapting, and implementing effective, evidence-based HIV prevention interventions
  • Describe two innovative strategies to fight HIV in Texas


T7 – TPHA and DSHS HIV/STD Research Award Finalist Presentations and Ceremony
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Ballroom A
David L. Lakey, M.D.,
Commissioner, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Dr. Lakey will present the 2010 Texas HIV/STD Research Award to one of three award semi-finalists.

T7A - Understanding Access to Care Among Newly Diagnosed HIV Patients in Houston, Texas
Lokesh Shahani, M.D., M.P.H.,
Resident, Department of Internal Medicine and Psychiatry, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois
Thomas Giordano, M.D., M.P.H., Houston Center for Quality of Care and Utilization Studies, Houston VA Medical Center, Houston, Texas
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
More than a quarter of patients with HIV in the United States are diagnosed in hospital settings, most often with advanced HIV related conditions. This late diagnosis of HIV is detrimental to the management of these patients. Access to care could be an important reason why people do not utilize medical care on a regular basis and are therefore diagnosed late. This study compared the access to care of patients diagnosed with HIV in hospital and outpatient settings. Researchers hypothesized that patients first diagnosed with HIV in a hospital setting were more likely to have lower access to care than patients who are diagnosed in an outpatient setting. This was not supported by our data. However higher educational level was an independent predictor of greater perceived access to care.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three existing and new developments in HIV and STD field epidemiology
  • Explain the role of public health in the HIV/AIDS/STD epidemics
  • Describe two instances of existing health disparities among individuals with HIV/AIDS and other STDs


T7B - Transgender HIV Behavioral Survey Pilot Study in Houston, Texas
Paige Padgett, Ph.D., M.P.H.,
Research Associate, University of Texas School of Public Health – Center for Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Department, Houston, Texas
Jan M.H. Risser, Ph.D., Houston Center for Quality of Care and Utilization Studies, Houston VA Medical Center, Houston, Texas
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Limited data exists to understand the unique risk behaviors of male-to-female (MTF) transgender persons; MTF transgenders of color, particularly African-Americans and Latinas are considered high risk for HIV infection. There is also limited data on methodologies that are effective in recruiting transgender women to participate in health survey research. In 2009, the CDC-funded The Transgender HIV Behavioral Survey (THBS) as a pilot study to explore the feasibility of using respondent driven sampling (RDS) to collect HIV behavioral surveillance data from minority MTF transgenders.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify two major research efforts on HIV and STD prevention
  • Describe two instances of existing health disparities among individuals with HIV/AIDS and other STDs


T7C - Comparison of Risk Behaviors Between Early and Late Initiation of Injection Drug Use
Hafeez Ur Rehman, M.D., M.P.H., C.P.H.,
Epidemiologist Specialist, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Karen Chronister, Ph.D., Epidemiologist Supervisor, HIV/AIDS Surveillance Program, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Marcia Wolverton, M.P.H., Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Injection drug use is related to nearly one-third of HIV diagnoses in the U.S. and is a commonly identified mode of transmission among persons with HIV. Individuals who initiate injection drug use early in life are more prone to high risk behaviors and HIV transmission. The objectives of this study are to compare demographic characteristics and risk behaviors of injection drug users who began using before the age of twenty (early initiators) with those who started after their twentieth birthday (late initiators).

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two instances of existing health disparities among individuals with HIV/AIDS and other STDs


T8 - Health Education in Texas Schools: Creating Greater Advocacy in the Community Objective
David C. Wiley, Ph.D.,
Professor of Health Education , Department of Health and Human Performance, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Pecos Room
Knowledge Level: Beginner
This presentation will focus on direct, actionable topics that consumers can advocate for in the area of coordinated school health. Participants will be given basic strategies for effective advocacy and tools to best accomplish advocacy at the local community level. Particular emphasis will be placed upon current coordinated school health issues in Texas and how consumers can address these specific issues at the local level.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three ways to enhance advocacy for HIV prevention


11:45 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. LUNCH (on your own)


Conference Home


Last updated February 22, 2011