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    DSHS HIV/STD Program

    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, Texas 78714

    Phone: (512) 533-3000

    E-mail the HIV/STD Program

    E-mail data requests to HIV/STD Program - This email can be used to request data and statistics on HIV, TB, and STDs in Texas. It cannot be used to get treatment or infection history for individuals, or to request information on programs and services. Please do not include any personal, identifying health information in your email such as HIV status, Date of Birth, Social Security Number, etc.

    For treatment/testing history, please contact your local Health Department.

    For information on HIV testing and services available to Persons Living with HIV and AIDS, please contact your local HIV services organization.

17th Texas HIV-STD Conference Agenda Tuesday Afternoon

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Program of Events, Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Workshops – Tuesday, May 25, 2010

A1 – Redoubling Our Efforts to Combat HIV/AIDS Among Gay and Bi-sexual Men of all Races and Ethnicities
Terrance E. Moore,
Associate Director, Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors, Washington, D.C.
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Ballroom A


B1 - Latest Trends in Substance Abuse and HIV/STD Transmission
Jane C. Maxwell, Ph.D.,
Senior Research Scientist, Addiction Research Institute, Center for Social Work Research, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Ballroom B

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This presentation will provide an update on the latest trends in drug use. Topics included: changes in the characteristics of users of cocaine, heroin, MDMA, and methamphetamine, changes in the various drug markets, the latest research on driving under the influence, and new hallucinogenic combinations that are emerging.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two trends in substance use and two new drugs of abuse
  • Identify one way substance use affects acquisition and transmission of HIV/STD


C1/2 - Chronic Disease in Longer-Term HIV Patients: Common Issues and Treatments
Michael Saag, M.D.,
Jim Straley Chair in AIDS Research, Director, Center for AIDS Research, Director, William C. Gorgas Center for Geographic Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Wedgewood Room

Knowledge Level: Advanced
This presentation will explore common clinical issues and treatments in the management of longer-term HIV patients. Dr. Saag is a renowned HIV researcher and serves on several professional boards and will be sharing his knowledge in this 2 part session.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two optimal strategies/programs to provide optimal care and treatment for people living with HIV
  • List three steps in the process of assessing for and managing co-morbidities/co-occurring conditions in people living with HIV disease
  • List two effects of aging on HIV pathogenesis with the appropriate care and treatment interventions


D1 - Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment (HAART): DHHS Guidelines 2009
Wayne Duffus, M.D.,
Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Brazos Room
Knowledge Level: Advanced
Dr. Duffus will discuss the December 2009 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-infected adults. The guidelines endorse prescribing HAART much earlier in the course of disease and provide new guidance on which drugs to use. Management of the treatment experienced patient, adherence, laboratory testing, changing therapies, and special considerations for pregnant women injection drug users, HIV-2 infection, and co-infection between HIV and HBV, HCV, or TB will also be discussed.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two optimal strategies/programs to provide optimal care and treatment for people living with HIV
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of two of the latest therapies and research findings for the treatment of HIV disease
  • Discuss the current understanding of best use of antiretroviral agents to prevent and control HIV disease


E1 - Best Practices for Developing Appropriate Sexual Health Programs for Border Hispanic Adolescents in Texas
Sheetal Malhotra, M.B.B.S., M.S.,
Director of Public Health Programs, Medical Institute for Sexual Health, Austin, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
San Antonio Room

Knowledge Level: Beginner
The presentation will discuss the use of focus groups to obtain data to tailor sexual health program approaches. Presenters conducted four focus groups of middle and high school-aged youth in the program areas to identify prevalent sexual beliefs, attitudes and behaviors of Hispanic border community adolescents. Each focus group was comprised of 8-12 participants. Resulting data were used to tailor the sexual heath education program implementation and evaluation and make programs relevant to the populations.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two best practices for conducting STD interventions
  • Describe two best practices for STD program leadership and evaluation


F1 - HIV Incidence Surveillance and Variant, Atypical and Resistant HIV Surveillance (VARHS) in Texas
Margaret Hawthorne, M.P.H.,
Epidemiologist, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Sharon Riley, M.A., Program Specialist, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Trinity A Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This presentation will focus on describing HIV Incidence Surveillance (HIS) and Variant, Atypical, Resistant HIV Surveillance (VARHS) in Texas. Texas is one of 25 states and cities funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for HIS and one of 11 funded for VARHS. HIS is used to estimate the number of individuals newly infected with HIV in a given year. Accurate HIV incidence estimates help paint a more complete picture of the HIV epidemic, distinguishing between recent and long-standing HIV infection, which allows public health officials to effectively monitor the epidemic, allocate resources and plan programs.

Drug resistance is a growing public health concern as it can lead to treatment failure, increased treatment costs, and the transmission of resistant strains of HIV. VARHS evaluates the prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance and the distribution of HIV-1 subtypes among persons with a new HIV diagnosis. Data gathered through resistance surveillance is useful for monitoring resistance trends in treated populations and identifying potential clusters of drug-resistant HIV in Texas.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe current epidemiology of HIV and STDs in Texas
  • Describe two surveillance systems used to capture HIV and STD related data
  • Describe how HIV diagnosis and treatment changes and emerging information technologies affect surveillance needs and methods


G1 - Promoting Your Agency's Work through Media Relations and Marketing
Renita Coleman, Ph.D.,
Associate Professor, School of Journalism, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Eric Roland, B.A., Senior Director of Marketing and Communications, Legacy Community Health Services, Houston, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Trinity B Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Developing and maintaining effective marketing and media relations strategies are an essential part of any agency's communication plan. This workshop will provide participants with the basic tools to help cultivate their agency as a reliable, authoritative source for HIV/STD information and promote their HIV/STD programs and services. Strategies to be discussed include developing messages, writing effective news releases, giving good interviews, understanding the needs of media professionals, working with new media outlets, using social networking tools and cross-promoting fundraising campaigns with media outreach.

Slides | Handouts [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List three ways a coordinated media relation plan can build information and an organization's reputation as an authoritative source for public health information


H1 - Revolutionary Leadership
Julie Thorpe, M.A.,
Director of Practice Development, CommUnityCare, Red Rock, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Pecos Room

Knowledge Level: Beginner
This presentation will focus on how managers can create and sustain employee satisfaction and discover how to attract, hire, focus and keep their most talented employees. Drawing from authors Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman and their book, First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently the presentation will explore the basic tenets all managers should know to manage for performance.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three strategies to improve management and development of staff
  • Describe three strategies to integrate and support new staff


I1 - Developing Multi-level Responses to HIV/AIDS Epidemics: The Case of MSM in Texas
Todd W. Harvey, M.A.,
Research Associate, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Nicole Angotti, Ph.D. Candidate, Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Ken Ripperger-Suhler, M.A., Research Associate, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Karol Kaye Harris, Ph.D., Researcher, University of Texas at Austin, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, Austin, Texas
Nell Gottlieb, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
San Marcos Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This session helps attendees practice a new perspective on HIV/AIDS intervention and prevention. Recent history of intervention in the HIV/AIDS epidemic among gay men and other MSM emphasizes individual risk behaviors and deficits. However, the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to make deep impacts into our communities, requiring an emphasis on social change models for health improvement. One model to catalyze change in the health of communities is the socio-ecological approach. This model moves beyond an individual-level focus of disease intervention to a focus on the multi-level systems that impact the health of individuals. Changing systems requires the efforts of skilled intervention planners and implementers.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two best practices for effectively focusing HIV prevention efforts on communities at risk
  • Identify and explain how to address social and environmental influences on health behavior
  • Identify two potential community partnerships outside the HIV field to support HIV prevention efforts
  • Identify three ways to enhance advocacy for HIV prevention
  • Describe two innovative strategies to fight HIV in Texas


J1A - Modeling Place Vulnerability of HIV/AIDS in Texas
Adam F. Harold,
Doctoral Student, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Joseph R. Oppong, Ph.D., Professor of Geography, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Chetan Tiwari, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of North Texas, Department of Geography, Denton, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 1:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Sabine Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Much research has been done on studying and identifying vulnerable people and populations with respect to disease, including HIV/AIDS. However, little has been done to identify ‘vulnerable places' with respect to these diseases, beyond a model that mirrors the composition of a population. While individual risk factors, such as behaviors, are crucial in understanding HIV/AIDS, the outcome of certain risky behaviors can vary by place. This makes the study and identification of vulnerable places necessary. This study conceptualizes and operationalizes a model for place vulnerability. The model shows that spatial variations in HIV/AIDS in Texas are in part due to neighborhood characteristics.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two instances of existing health disparities among individuals with HIV/AIDS and other STDs


J1B - Substance Abuse, Sexual Behaviors, HIV/STD/HCV Testing, and Prevention Service Utilization Among Injection Drug Users in Dallas, Texas
Shane U. Sheu, M.P.H.,
Epidemiologist, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Praveen R. Pannala, M.D., M.P.H., Medical Epidemiologist, Information and Projects Group, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Sonia Arbona, Ph.D., Medical Geographer, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Erin Elbel, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Doug Kershaw, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas
Sharon K. Melville, M.D., M.P.H., Manager, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Sabine Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Injection drug users (IDU) are a population at risk for HIV infection in Texas. In this population, the presence of other risk behaviors further compounds the risk for HIV transmission. The purpose of this study is to describe and explore the relationship between concomitant substance abuse and sex without condom use among IDU in Dallas. The researchers also examined the relationship between lifetime substance abuse with HIV, HCV and syphilis testing behaviors and prevention service utilization in this population.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain two of the latest HIV/STD surveillance methodologies
  • Explain the role of public health in the HIV/AIDS/STD epidemics


A2 - HIV/STD Prevention Needs and Interventions for Adolescent MSM
Mike Hardy,
Young Adult Program Coordinator, Resource Center Dallas, Dallas, Texas
Adam King, Lead Young Adult Program Coordinator, Resource Center Dallas, Dallas, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Ballroom A

Knowledge Level: Beginner
The overall goal of this presentation is to provide HIV/STD health professionals with the skills to effectively address HIV/STD prevention needs of adolescent men who have sex with men (MSM). Participants will have the opportunity to learn and discuss the barriers to HIV/STD prevention, focusing on the social, community, cultural and interpersonal challenges faced by adolescent MSM and to identify appropriate programming to increase and enhance prevention efforts. During the workshop, participants will also be given the chance to observe a demonstration on how utilizing online social networking sites can be used to improve visibility for programs targeting adolescent MSM.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two best practices for effectively focusing HIV prevention efforts on communities at risk
  • Describe two best practices for developing, adapting, and implementing effective, evidence-based HIV prevention interventions
  • Describe two methods for evaluating the effectiveness of HIV prevention programs
  • Identify two potential community partnerships outside the HIV field to support HIV prevention efforts
  • Identify and explain how to address social and environmental influences on health behavior


B2 - Adapting Interventions
Tracee Belzle,
Technology Transfer Team – Project Manager, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Ballroom B

Knowledge Level: Beginner
Adaptation is a natural process when implementing evidence based interventions originally researched in cities or large urban areas, but being implemented by community based organizations with limited resources and located in small sometimes rural areas. This presentation will focus on defining the types of adaptations most commonly used for adapting evidence-based interventions. Participants will learn practical steps associated with adaptation that supports the science of the evidence-based interventions. An understanding of CDC's Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions program is beneficial.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe best practices for developing, adapting, and implementing effective, evidence-based HIV prevention interventions


D2 - Anal Dysplasia
Stephen Weis, D.O.,
HIV/AIDS Clinician, Tarrant County Public Health-Preventive Medicine Clinic, Fort Worth, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Brazos Room

Knowledge Level: Beginning/Intermediate
This presentation will review anal dysplasia screening and treatment for HIV/AIDS clients including risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of anal carcinoma. Also covered will be a description of Tarrant County's results over the past two years in a clinic that provides primary care to persons with HIV/AIDS. Presenters will also discuss why anal dysplasia screening should be a part of routine HIV/AIDS care.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two strategies/programs to provide optimal care and treatment for people living with HIV
  • List three steps in the process of assessing for and managing co-morbidities/co-occurring conditions in people living with HIV disease


E2 - Fighting Syphilis in Texas: Awareness Campaigns from Dallas to Houston
Eric Roland, B.A.,
Senior Director of Marketing and Communications, Legacy Community Health Services, Houston, Texas
Ruben Ramirez, M.A., Community Health Programs Manager, Resource Center Dallas, Dallas, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
San Antonio Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Since 2001, Texas has seen an increased number of cases of syphilis among MSM and African-Americans, especially in the major metropolitan areas of Dallas and Houston. In Dallas, syphilis has traditionally affected both the MSM and high-risk African-American, White and Hispanic populations. In Houston, White MSM were the most impacted early in the decade, but in the last few years the disease has shifted to young Black and Latino MSM and young Black females. To address the higher rates of syphilis, DSHS sought community-based organizations in both Dallas and Houston to produce marketing campaigns to raise awareness about the signs and symptoms of syphilis and encourage people at risk to get tested. In 2008, Resource Center Dallas launched an extensive marketing campaign and community-based effort called Stomp Out Syphilis (SOS), focused on MSM and high-risk African-American, White, and Hispanic populations. Meanwhile, Legacy Community Health Services in Houston in cooperation with the Houston Syphilis Elimination Advisory Council (SEAC) created the Don't Sleep On It campaign targeting black adolescents and young adults. Each of these campaigns aims to raise awareness and encourage testing among populations with a high incidence of syphilis. Using these strategies of targeted marketing, Dallas and Houston are able to promote syphilis awareness in neighborhoods and among the populations most affected by the disease.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two innovative strategies to combat STD in Texas
  • Describe three characteristics of social marketing
  • Describe three ways in which social marketing methods can increase the perceived benefits of and decrease the perceived barriers to behavior change


F2A - Using the Concept of A Logic Model to Guide “No Reportable Risk” HIV Investigation in Houston
Michelle Funchess, M.S.,
Surveillance Investigator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Trinity A Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This presentation provides a new approach to investigate no reportable risk (NRR) cases. The approach uses a logic model, which is structured on availability of resources. Following the logic model, we developed a protocol to collect data and analyze outcome. At the end of this project, we were able to classify risk and improve the performance of the HIV surveillance program in Houston. The accurate classification of potential risk factors is necessary to develop effective interventions, distribute resources and identify any emerging risk factors that are of interest to public health.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List one current issue in surveillance of HIV/STD
  • List two best practices in surveillance of HIV/STD


F2B - Implementing HIV Partner Services Surveillance Perspective in Four Health Departments
Shirley Chan, M.P.H., M.T., A.S.C.P.,
Staff Epidemiologist Specialist/HIV Incidence Surveillance Coordinator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Trinity A Room
Knowledge Level: Beginner
Notifying partners about HIV infection is an important component of HIV prevention. Texas law mandates attempts to elicit and notify partners. However, it had been the opinion of CDC that the HIV surveillance system is not designed for case management purposes. Historically, the primary goal of the HIV surveillance program is to provide crucial HIV statistics to monitor current and emerging trends in HIV transmission. In addition, the use of surveillance data can characterize recent infection and target prevention resources. However, the surveillance information can provide an epidemiological window into the HIV epidemics. This presentation will describe the history of Partner Services (PS) in Houston as well as PS perspectives from three other health departments in the nation. Lessons learned from sharing information with others may provide the prevention benefit it provides to the organization.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List one current issue in surveillance of HIV/STD
  • List two best practices in surveillance of HIV/STD


G2 - Promoting Health Literacy through Clear Communication
Manisha H. Maskay, Ph.D.,
Independent Consultant, Health Care Solutions, Dallas, Texas
Kim Whatley, B.A., Project Director OPTIONS+, AIDS Arms, Inc., Dallas, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Trinity B Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This interactive session will present challenges related to low literacy overall, review components of health literacy and discuss the role of clear communication, both written and verbal, with regard to promoting health literacy. Tools and strategies to evaluate reading levels and messaging will be shared.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three effective methods to cultivate leadership at all levels of an organization
  • Describe three strategies to improve management and development of staff
  • Describe three strategies to enhance internal technical and staffing skills
  • Describe three strategies to integrate and support new staff
  • List three methods to strengthen organizational structure
  • Demonstrate three enhanced skills important for leaders in their day-to-day work


H2 - Board Capacity Building
Candyss Bryant,
Coordinator, Center for Community Based and Nonprofit Organizations at Austin Community College, Austin, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Pecos Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This session will explore and define one of the most important areas for a nonprofit organization to build capacity: the Board of Directors. Participants will explore the roles, responsibilities and expectations of, and between, the Board of Directors, officers, volunteers, executive director and staff. How these key organizational players interrelate and work together individually and within groups directly relates to an organization's capacity and determines much of a nonprofit organization's effectiveness.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three effective methods to cultivate leadership at all levels of an organization
  • Describe three strategies to improve management and development of staff
  • List three methods to strengthen organizational structure


I2 - Texas HIV Medication Program 101 for Service Providers
Katherine Wells, M.P.H.,
Special Projects Manager, Texas HIV Medication Program, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Becky Ruiz, B.S.W., Client Services Coordinator, Texas HIV Medication Program, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
San Marcos Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This workshop will introduce service providers and clients to the Texas HIV Medication Program (THMP) and cover issues such as eligibility, medication order processing and recertification. THMP staff will discuss what constitutes a complete application and provide tips on common errors in submitting an application. The presentation will also cover the benefits and the eligibility process for the two programs under the THMP umbrella, the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) and the State Pharmacy Assistance Program (SPAP). Personnel who assist individuals in applying for the THMP are encouraged to attend.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss how best to explain to a client the purpose of the Texas HIV Medication Program (THMP)
  • Describe the HIV State Pharmacy Assistance (SPAP) Program and the THMP
  • Describe the SPAP application and recertification process


J2A - Predictors of HIV Testing Among Injection Drug Users in Houston, Texas
Alice C. Cates, M.S.,
Research Associate, Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas
Jan M. H. Risser, Ph.D., Houston Center for Quality of Care and Utilization Studies, Houston VA Medical Center, Houston, Texas
Jordan R. Cahoon, Graduate Research Assistant, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Sabine Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Testing is a critical step of HIV prevention, particularly among historically high-risk populations such as injection drug users (IDUs). Several studies have determined the prevalence of testing among distinct communities of IDUs, but few have investigated potential predictors of HIV testing. The presenters will discuss a study examining the association of prior HIV testing with several demographic factors and drug-related behaviors among IDUs. Respondent-driven sampling was used to collect data from the 2009 cycle of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance project in Houston, Texas. Results revealed that of the 529 eligible participants, 89.8% reported that they had previously been tested for HIV. Presenters will discuss groups with higher and lower testing prevalence. The analysis highlights groups that may be neglected by current testing outreach efforts. Implications for testing strategies will be shared.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three existing and new developments in HIV and STD field epidemiology
  • Explain the role of public health in the HIV/AIDS/STD epidemics


J2B - Psychosocial Correlates of Needle Sharing Among Injection Drug Users in Houston, Texas
Jordan R. Cahoon,
Graduate Research Assistant, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas
Jan M. H. Risser, Ph.D., Houston Center for Quality of Care and Utilization Studies, Houston VA Medical Center, Houston, Texas
Paige Padgett, Ph.D., M.P.H., Research Associate, University of Texas School of Public Health – Center for Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Department, Houston, Texas
Alice C. Cates, M.S., Research Associate, Division of Epidemiology and Disease Control, School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Sabine Room
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
In Houston, injection drug users (IDUs) account for 10% of HIV cases, but approximately 1% of the population. Sharing needles is a risk behavior associated with HIV that is unique to this population. The presentation will share information on an analysis comparing psychosocial characteristics of needle sharing and non-sharing IDUs in Houston. Data from the 2009 cycle of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) Project in Houston was used to examine associations between needle sharing and a variety of factors including: decision-making confidence and risk-taking, social support, depression and spirituality. Results indicate that of the participants included in the analysis, half shared needles in the past 12 months. Depression, risk-taking, decision-making confidence, spirituality and social support were all related to needle-sharing behavior. These results will be discussed with respect to implications for HIV prevention programs and interventions appropriate for high-risk populations. The need for further research on these associations will be discussed.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify three existing and new developments in HIV and STD field epidemiology


3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Break


A3 - Implications of Lifting the Federal Funding Ban on Syringe Exchange
Natalie O. Cramer, M.S.S.W.,
Associate Director, Prevention, National Alliance of State & Territorial AIDS Directors, Washington, D.C.
Alessandra Ross, Injection Drug Use Policy and Program Coordinator, Office of AIDS, California Department of Public Health, Sacramento, California
Dan Bigg, C.R.A.D.C., Director, Chicago Recovery Alliance, Chicago, Illinois
Mary Howe, Founder and Executive Director, Homeless Youth Alliance, San Francisco, California
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Ballroom A

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This session will provide an overview of the policy and programmatic implications for state health departments and community based organizations providing syringe access services following the lifting of the ban of the use of federal resources to support needle exchange programs. Syringe access refers to several approaches geared towards ensuring that people who inject drugs have access to sterile syringes to prevent the transmission of HIV, viral hepatitis and other blood-borne pathogens. These approaches may include programs to exchange used syringes, but also includes over-the-counter pharmacy sale of syringes without prescription and structural interventions to reduce barriers to syringe exchange and pharmacy sale of syringes. Despite the scientific evidence of the effectiveness of expanding syringe access in preventing transmission, the federal government prohibited the use of federal funds for syringe exchange programs until late 2009. The 21-year-old ban on use of federal financing for syringe exchange programs was lifted in December 2009 when President Obama signed the omnibus HHS Education FY 2010 Appropriations bill into law without this restriction. The presenters will share their experiences including challenges/lessons learned and "best practice" recommendations.

Slides | Slides | Handout [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two best practices for effectively focusing HIV prevention efforts on communities at risk


B3 - HIV Routine Testing Panel
Jenny McFarlane,
Routine HIV Testing and Perinatal Prevention Coordinator, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Ken Malone, HIV Testing Project Coordinator, Harris County Hospital District, Thomas Street Health Center, Houston, Texas
Pam Green, HIV Project Coordinator, Emergency Room Nurse, Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas
James McCarthy, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas Medical School- Houston, Medical Director, Emergency Center, Memorial Hermann Hospital - Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas
Sharolyn Martin R.N., B.S.N., C.E.N., JPS Health Network, Emergency Department Research Nurse, Expanded HIV Testing Grant Site Coordinator, Fort Worth, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Ballroom B
Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This presentation demonstrates how the CDC's Recommendations for Routine HIV testing in Health Care Settings have been implemented in one private and two public emergency centers, urgent care centers and community health centers. The panelists will describe their implementation experience and barriers and solutions in implementating routine testing. Participants will receive hands-on guidance and advice on how to implement routine HIV testing at their health care setting.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify two potential community partnerships outside the HIV field to support HIV prevention efforts
  • Describe two innovative strategies to fight HIV in Texas


C3 - Neurological Complications and Treatment of HIV
David Clifford, M.D.,
Professor of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, St. Louis, Missouri
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Wedgewood Room

Knowledge Level: Advanced
This presentation will give a brief overview of the neurological complications most commonly encountered in HIV infection. It will discuss the frequency of the primary neurological complications, and discuss potential mechanisms by which these occur. Approaches to recognition of neurologic impairment will be addressed, including bedside approaches as well as Cerebral Spinal Fluid (CSF) and imaging. Current approaches to HIV therapy will be reviewed for strengths and weaknesses for treating the brain, with special reference to Central Nervous System (CNS) penetration of drugs. Optimal treatment for complications will be emphasized.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two optimal strategies/programs to provide optimal care and treatment for people living with HIV
  • List three steps in the process of assessing for and managing co-morbidities/co-occurring conditions in people living with HIV disease
  • List two effects of aging on HIV pathogenesis with the appropriate care and treatment interventions


D3 - Retroviral Review
Wayne Duffus, M.D.,
Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Brazos Room

Knowledge Level: Advanced
Dr. Duffus will review the state of HIV treatment from the progress toward once-daily regimens to recommendations for prevention efforts and treatment of opportunistic infections. The adverse effects of NNRTIs, PIs, NRTIs, fusion inhibitors, and CCR5 antagonist; lipodystrophy and its effect on adherence; drug interactions with ARVs; the timing of ART initiation in special populations; and the relationship between CD4 count and AIDS malignancies will be discussed.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Evaluate the effectiveness of two of the latest therapies and research findings for the treatment of HIV disease
  • Discuss the current understanding of best use of antiretroviral agents to prevent and control HIV disease
  • Discuss the potential impacts of novel treatment agents currently in the research/development pipeline on persons living with HIV and the care and treatment community


E3 - Using Geographical Information Systems to Represent Sexual Health Outcome Trends in El Paso County, Texas
Sheetal Malhotra, M.B.B.S., M.S.,
Director of Public Health Programs, Medical Institute for Sexual Health, Austin, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
San Antonio Room

Knowledge Level: Beginner
Mapping data allows easy visualization of occurrence of and trends in health events. Interventions for adolescent sexual health outcomes such as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and teen births have rarely been evaluated using GIS. Geocoded data and maps from a program in Texas county school districts will be shown as examples. The maps show chlamydia cases and teen births and rates in the program school districts. These maps will be used to compare sexual health outcomes geographically (between County school districts) as well temporally (years).

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three ways GIS mapping can monitor sexual health in a community
  • List two techniques for presenting public health data more effectively


F3 - Perinatal HIV in Texas and Addressing Missed Opportunities through the Texas Consortium for Perinatal HIV Prevention (TCPHP)
Elvia Ledezma, M.P.H.,
Epidemiologist, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Janak Patel, M.D., Professor and Director, Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
Judy Levison, M.D., Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
Leslie Conley, L.M.S.W.-I.P.R., Social Work/Case Manager, Parkland Health and Hospital System, Dallas, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Trinity A Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This presentation will provide a description of Enhanced Perinatal Surveillance performed by the DSHS HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch as a means of monitoring the perinatal HIV epidemic in Texas. Enhanced perinatal surveillance data helps focus perinatal prevention efforts and assesses the effectiveness of perinatal HIV prevention. As part of this presentation, a general overview of the epidemiology of perinatal HIV in Texas and a description of missed opportunities for the prevention of perinatal HIV transmission will be presented.

This presentation will also provide an overview of the Texas Consortium for Perinatal HIV Prevention (TCPHP), a group of professionals and agencies specializing in the treatment of HIV pregnant women and their infants and its role in developing guidelines for care of HIV-positive pregnant women and recommendations for HIV testing of pregnant women. Presenters will provide case study reports of perinatally infected infants highlighting missed opportunities that may have otherwise resulted in the prevention of perinatal HIV transmission. Furthermore, a description of a rapid HIV testing program in the Houston will be presented as an example of prevention activities that may result in decreased perinatal HIV transmission in Texas.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the epidemiology of perinatal HIV transmission
  • Describe two best practices for developing, adapting, and implementing effective, evidence-based HIV prevention interventions


G3 - Influences on Austin Gay and Bisexual Men’s Sexual Behavior and Attitudes toward Gay Community, and the Connections between Attitudes and Behavior
Timothy Mattison,
Mpowerment Lead Coordinator, AIDS Services of Austin, Austin, Texas
Joseph Elder, Many Men, Many Voices Coordinator, Wright House, Austin, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Trinity B Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
Gay and bisexual men continue to contract HIV at higher rates than heterosexuals. Prevention workers reach these men through gay community to promote safer sex. Social science theories should help us understand how to change sexual behavior and attitudes toward community. But some theories do not fit our communities well. Community assessments can determine which ones fit, and thus improve our approaches. These workshop presenters will illustrate this using as a framework the results from AIDS Services Austin/Mpowerment's 2009 Community Assessment on gay and bisexual men's health. These results should help prevention workers understand better gay and bisexual men in Austin, Texas and other cities like it.


H3 - 2009 HIV Employment Law Update
Mitchell Katine, J.D.,
Attorney at Law, Katine & Lechman, Houston, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Pecos Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate/Advanced
Most HIV-positive individuals now live full lives, including the ability and desire to continue their employment until customary retirement age. This presentation will focus on how to protect the employment rights of HIV-positive working employees and those desiring to return to work in light of the January 1, 2009 amendments to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This program will present information on:

  • how the ADA provides protection from employment discrimination
  • if, when, and how an HIV positive employee should make disclosure of his or her HIV status to the employer
  • requesting reasonable accommodation
  • HIV confidentiality and testing issues
  • how to proceed in the event of HIV employment discrimination

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two amendments to the Americans with Disabilities Act and how those changes affect those with HIV


I3 - Uncovering the Burden of HIV-Infected Individuals on Houston Syphilis Outbreak
Biru Yang, Ph.D., M.P.H.,
Epidemiologist/Biostatistician, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Amanda Kubala, M.P.H., Epidemiologist Specialist, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Hickmon H. Friday, Jr., M.P.H., M.P.A., Senior Health Planner/Data Manager, Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS), Houston, Texas
Shawta Sackett, R.N., B.S.N., M.P.H., Staff Epidemiologist, Houston Department of Health and Human Services Houston, Texas
Naqi Mohammad, B.S., Surveillance Investigator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services Houston, Texas
Lupita Thornton, B.S., Public Health Investigator Manager, Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS), Houston, Texas
Riju Stephen, M.S., GIS Analyst, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
San Marcos Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This presentation will examine the demographic, geographic and risk behavioral characteristics of HIV-infected individuals who contracted syphilis between 2007 and 2008. In addition, we will map neighborhood-level factors using ArcGIS software for HIV prevention outreach planning. The neighborhood level factors will include median income, education level, density of health clinics or community-based organizations, and locations of facilities where syphilis diagnoses occurred. The results of this study can provide epidemiological and geographical information for Houston's HIV/STD prevention programs to develop targeted risk reduction counseling for co-infected individuals, to address gaps in services by geographical locations, and to provide recommendations for future HIV/STD prevention service planning. Moreover, this project demonstrates that the utility of ArcGIS mapping technology to improve efficiency and effectiveness of public health practice.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two uses of emerging technology that can improve efficiency and effectiveness in public health practice
  • Explain two ways in which technology can be used to link high-risk populations to prevention and care services
  • Describe two populations at risk for STD or HIV in Texas, the modes of transmission, disease progression, diagnosis, and treatment
  • List three ways to use current HIV and/or STD surveillance and data collection systems to assist in describing and developing prevention interventions and programs for hepatitis and/or TB infected population


J3A - Preliminary Assessment of Adherence to 1st Tier HRSA HIV/AIDS Bureau Clinical Indicators in a Community-Based HIV Program
M. Keith Rawlings, M.D., A.A.H.I.V.S.,
Medical Director and Director of Clinical Research, AIDS Arms, Inc.Peabody Health Center, Dallas, Texas
Lauren Rogers, Data Manager, AIDS Arms, Inc., Dallas, Texas
Jennifer Klein, M.S.N., F.N.P., A.A.H.I.V.S., AIDS Arms, Inc, Dallas, Texas
Bethsheba Johnson, M.S.N., C.N.S., G.N.P., A.A.C.R.N., AIDS Arms, Inc, Dallas, Texas
John Martin, M.D., F.A.C.P., A.A.H.I.V.S., AIDS Arms, Inc, Dallas, Texas
Ejeanee Queen, M.S.N., F.N.P., A.A.H.I.V.S., AIDS Arms, Inc, Dallas, Texas
Christopher Evans, M.D., AIDS Arms, Inc, Dallas, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Sabine Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This presentation will discuss recently established clinical indicators of performance for Ryan White grantees starting in 2010 by the Health Resources and Services Administration HIV/AIDS Bureau (HAB). These indicators give HAB and individual programs the ability to better assess the level of clinical care being provided. Retrospective review of data was used to examine the current level of adherence to the HAB indicators and any demographic differences in achieving them. Four HAB clinical indicators were reviewed over a10-month period. Results indicate a total of 846 unique patients received 4,400 ambulatory medical and laboratory visits. The data suggest that there is room for improvement in meeting the HAB indicators and that there are patient demographic differences. Age over 50 has a significant impact on meeting indicators for CD4 count, HAART and medical visits compared to those under 30 years old. A greater percentage of females were prescribed PCP prophylaxis and kept appointments then males. Implications for future research will be discussed.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the three preliminary research findings of the Assessment of Adherence to 1st Tier HRSA HIV/AIDS Bureau Clinical Indicators in a Community-Based HIV Program


J3B - Pneumocystis Jiroveci Pneumonia Trends at the Time of AIDS Diagnosis
Ukari Oku, M.P.H.,
Epidemiologist Specialist, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Sabine Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This presentation will show a dramatic downward trend of PJP in Houston Harris County from the early-phase (1988-94) to mid-phase (1995-2000) and current-phase (2001-2005) at the initial diagnosis of AIDS. At the start of the early-phase (1988) over 60% of all diagnosed cases of AIDS were accompanied by a diagnosis of PJP compared to 7% in 2005. The presenter will look at the three phases in his analysis and show tables and graphs to explain result trends.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the trend of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia early-phase, mid-phase, and current phase in Houston

Evening Events – Tuesday, May 25, 2010

5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., TBD 12 Step Meeting (on your own)

Bat Watching
6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., Ann Richards/Congress Avenue Bridge
Join Bat Ladies Trish Larwood and Sydney Minnerly for a fun-filled adventure to the Ann Richards/Congress Avenue Bridge to watch Austin's famous mascots leave for dinner at dusk. After, explore the treasures of South Congress Avenue for a true Austin experience.

The Evolving Epidemic: HIV Epidemiology, Testing and Therapy Initiation (Wayne Bockmon, M.D.)
6:15 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Pecos Room

Dinner program for 40 sponsored by Gilead Sciences.

Roller Skating
6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., Playland Skate Center

Join Texas Rollergirl Ann Dills for an evening of roller skating at Playland Skate Center. Meet outside the hotel lobby doors at 6:30 p.m.. The $7.50 admission price includes skate rental. Skating is at your own risk.

T9-Best Practices In Enhancing Effective Prevention Messages with Performance
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m., Glass Oaks

Ms. Daisy Durex, Ms. Helen of Trojan, Ms. Maggie Num, Patti Le Play Safe, Ida Mae Watergate
Performers have incorporated clever HIV/ STD prevention messages in their shows since the early 80s. Come watch and network with innovative HIV/STD prevention performers who have incorporated messages into entertaining shows. Discuss best practices for enhancing effective prevention messages with performance. Includes performers from Texas and New York . This session is open to everyone!


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Last updated February 22, 2011