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    DSHS HIV/STD Program

    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, Texas 78714

    Phone: (512) 533-3000

    E-mail the HIV/STD Program

    E-mail data requests to HIV/STD Program - This email can be used to request data and statistics on HIV, TB, and STDs in Texas. It cannot be used to get treatment or infection history for individuals, or to request information on programs and services. Please do not include any personal, identifying health information in your email such as HIV status, Date of Birth, Social Security Number, etc.

    For treatment/testing history, please contact your local Health Department.

    For information on HIV testing and services available to Persons Living with HIV and AIDS, please contact your local HIV services organization.

17th Texas HIV-STD Conference Agenda Wednesday Morning

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Program of Events, Wednesday, May 26, 2010

7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Plaza Registration A General Registration
7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Plaza Registration B On-Site Registration and Exhibitor Check-In
7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Lobby Registration Continuing Education Registration
12 noon to 5:00 p.m. The Arbor Exhibits
12 noon to 5:00 p.m. Rio Grande A Poster Presentation Preview
12 noon to 5:00 p.m. Rio Grande B AIDS Quilt and Focus on Living Exhibit
24 Hours Guadalupe Internet Café

Mini-Plenary Sessions

W1 - The Psychiatry of AIDS
Glenn J. Treisman, M.D.,
Professor, Director, AIDS Psychiatry Service, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Wedgewood Room

Knowledge Level: Advanced
The psychiatric implications of HIV infection are immense, possibly more important in this disease than in almost any other. Dr. Glenn Treisman, Professor and Director of the AIDS Psychiatry Service at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland works in the Moore Clinic, which has served thousands of HIV patients, mostly from urban, economically disadvantaged populations. About 25 percent of the patients seen at the Moore Clinic have a major mental illness and life situations that merit psychiatric interventions. The main goals in the mental health care they receive are to improve quality of life, to increase engagement in medical care (including adherence to HAART), and to modify behavior to reduce the probability of transmission. Few diseases exist in which all three components are so crucial in terms of outcome, survival and epidemiology.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two optimal strategies/programs to provide optimal care and treatment for people living with HIV
  • List three steps in the process of assessing for and managing co-morbidities/co-occurring conditions in people living with HIV disease
  • Discuss two treatment and care issues and two current research findings for the management of specific patient populations living with HIV disease

W2 - Characterizing HIV Risk Behaviors: CDC's National Behavioral Surveillance Systems
Elizabeth A. DiNenno, Ph.D.,
Acting Team Leader Acting, Behavioral Surveillance, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention NCHHSTP/CCID, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atl anta, Georgia
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Ballroom B

Knowledge Level: Advanced
This presentation will focus on CDC's newest and most comprehensive systems for monitoring risk behaviors and clinical outcomes among two populations in the U.S.: HIV-infected patients in care (the Medical Monitoring Project, or MMP) and uninfected persons at high-risk of HIV (the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System, or NHBS). These systems use innovative methodologies in an effort to understand risk behaviors related to acquiring and transmitting HIV. Data from NHBS and MMP can also be used on a local level to adapt prevention messages and activities. The presenter will update the audience on these national efforts, share lessons learned and present the latest research from these systems. The presentation will conclude with a discussion on upcoming projects to target prevention among high-risk populations, including transgender women, young minority MSM and heterosexuals at increased risk of HIV.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain two of the latest HIV/STD surveillance methodologies

W3 - Dance of the Generations
Bob Scott,
Senior Business Partner, Organizational Effectiveness, Galveston, Texas
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Ballroom A

Knowledge Level: Beginner
For the first time in American history, there are four distinct generations in the work-place; the Traditional Generation, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y (or Nexters). Through defining events, each generation has developed a unique "filter" though which they hear and process information. The presenter will give a unique, humorous and energetic look at how we can bridge the generation gap in the work place.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three strategies to improve management and development of staff
  • Describe three strategies to integrate and support new staff

W4 - Structural Interventions and the Science of Prevention
Richard Wolitski, Ph.D.,
Deputy Director, Behavioral and Social Science, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Glass Oaks Room

Knowledge Level: Advanced
In the past decade, research has significantly advanced our knowledge and ability to prevent the transmission of HIV, other STDs and viral hepatitis. Structural interventions hold great promise for further improving the health of the communities we serve. These interventions seek to change behavior by changing structures, laws and policies that affect human behavior, the risk of disease transmission or the availability of prevention information and tools. This presentation will define structural interventions and discuss their role in a comprehensive approach to prevention that addresses underlying social determinants of health (e.g., discrimination, poverty, homelessness). Findings from research on the influence of social determinants of health and the effectiveness of structural interventions (such as condom availability, syringe access, economic interventions, housing) will be summarized and discussed. The implications of prevention science for community-based prevention programs will be considered throughout the presentation.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two best practices for developing, adapting, and implementing effective, evidence-based HIV prevention interventions

10:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Break

W5 - HIV, HCV, and HBV Co-Infection and Hepatitis Integration
Part I:
Dushayantha T. Jayaweera, M.D., MRCOG (UK), F.A.C.P.,
Professor of Clinical Medicine, Chairman, IRB-C, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 10:15 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Wedgewood Room

Knowledge Level: Advanced
The worldwide prevalence of both hepatitis C and hepatitis B is staggering. Treatment outcomes worsen significantly in patients co-infected with HIV and hepatitis. This presentation will outline the natural history of HBV and HCV as well as the recommended treatment regimens for both in the presence of HIV infection.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List three steps in the process of assessing for and managing co-morbidities/co-occurring conditions in people living with HIV disease

Part II:
Hunter Hammill, M.D.,
Obstetrics and Gynecology, Primary Health Network of South Texas, Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Section of Infectious Disease, Section of Adolescent/Pediatric Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 11:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Wedgewood Room

This presentation will review hepatitis B transmission and viral hepatitis disease etiology, discuss populations at high risk for infection and vaccination recommendations. Populations being served in HIV/STD clinics and opportunities for collaborations will be discussed with a model for hepatitis integration in HIV and STD settings provided.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe at least one way a program has integrated one or more of the following with HIV testing: testing for hepatitis, other sexually transmitted diseases, TB, substance abuse, mental health issues, and/or family planning
  • Describe the three populations most at risk for hepatitis in Texas, the modes of hepatitis transmission, hepatitis diagnosis and treatment
  • List two areas of similarities for collaboration of Hepatitis with HIV and STD service delivery providers
  • List three ways to use current HIV and/or STD surveillance and data collection systems to assist in describing and developing prevention interventions and programs for hepatitis and/or TB infected populations

W6 - Sexual Harm Reduction for Gay and Bisexual Men: Navigating HIV in its Third Decade
Christian Grov, Ph.D., M.P.H.,
Assistant Professor, Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences, Brooklyn College, CUNY, Faculty Affiliate – The Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training (CHEST), New York, New York
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Ballroom B

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
A recent CDC report noted that men who have sex with men (MSM) are 44 times more likely than other men to contract HIV. Three decades into the epidemic, gay and bisexual men have adopted innovative ways in which to navigate HIV transmission risks. Researchers have named some of these techniques “serosorting,” “seroadaptation,” “seroassuming,” and “strategic positioning”. Each approach carries unique risks and benefits. This presentation will provide an overview of factors impacting HIV transmission among gay and bisexual men, describe community responses and harm reduction strategies to reduce HIV, and review research on these harm reduction strategies. Providers' familiarity and understanding of these practices and how they can be utilized to benefit health will impact their subsequent effectiveness in preventing HIV and other STDs. Because seroadaptation may impact other STDs differently than HIV, it is important that health providers fully understand the practices and prevention implications in order to coordinate effective health messages.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and explain how to address social and environmental influences on health behavior

W7 - Expedited Partner Therapy for Management of Certain Sexually Transmitted Infections
Matthew Golden, M.D., M.P.H.,
Associate Professor, Medicine, Adjunct Associate Professor, Epidemiology, Center for AIDS and STD, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Matthew Hogben, Ph.D., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Nick Curry, M.D. (Moderator), Medical Officer, TB/HIV/STD/Viral Hepatitis, Infectious Disease Prevention Section, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Ballroom A

This presentation will provide both an overview and specifics on the use of Expedited Partner Therapy (EPT) in the management of STDs. The Texas Medical Board recently revised the Administrative Code to expressly allow for the use of EPT in the treatment of partners of patients with STDs. Other states have been using EPT in various forms. Definitions and principles of EPT, evidence of the efficacy and effectiveness provided, and options for implementing EPT will be provided. Next steps are discussed.

Slides [Slideshare]

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two current STD testing recommendations
  • Describe two best practices for partner services
  • Describe two policies and/or clinical practices that expedite, enhance, or otherwise improve delivery of STD services

W8 - Community Mobilization: How to Get Community Partners Involved in HIV Prevention
Nike Lukan, M.P.H.,
Vice President of Prevention Services, AIDS Foundation Houston, Houston, Texas
Jerry McCruse, DJ, 97.9 The Box, Houston, Texas
Beau J. Mitts, M.P.H., Project Manager, Care Coordination, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Bureau of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control Care, Treatment and Housing Program, New York, New York
Isabella Rideaux, DJ, 97.9 The Box, Houston, Texas
Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.
Glass Oaks Room

Knowledge Level: Intermediate
This presentation will show how community mobilization works to leverage limited funds and garner broad community involvement in the implementation of effective programs. Non-traditional partners offer unique expertise and talents, and are often willing to work together, focusing on a common goal. In Houston, the local city health department, non-profit organizations, and for-profit organizations partner together allowing each partner to reach their own goals. The presenter will describe how Houston implemented Hip Hop for HIV and other community activities to reduce HIV stigma, increase HIV testing and garner new community partners.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two best practices for effectively focusing HIV prevention efforts on communities at risk
  • Identify two potential community partnerships outside the HIV field to support HIV prevention efforts

Conference Planning Committee Luncheon (Provided)
11:45 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., Rio Grande A

Everyone is invited to attend this luncheon in honor of the 17th Texas HIV/STD Conference Planning Committee


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Last updated February 22, 2011