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    DSHS HIV/STD Program

    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, Texas 78714

    Phone: (512) 533-3000

    E-mail the HIV/STD Program

    E-mail data requests to HIV/STD Program - This email can be used to request data and statistics on HIV, TB, and STDs in Texas. It cannot be used to get treatment or infection history for individuals, or to request information on programs and services. Please do not include any personal, identifying health information in your email such as HIV status, Date of Birth, Social Security Number, etc.

    For treatment/testing history, please contact your local Health Department.

    For information on HIV testing and services available to Persons Living with HIV and AIDS, please contact your local HIV services organization.

2012 Texas HIV-STD Conference Session Overviews II

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October 28-31, 2012
Austin, Texas


Session Overviews


Sunday | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday minilogo


Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Tuesday, October 30, 2012
Mini Plenary Presentations
8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Readiness, Trust and Adherence: Do the Guidelines Work in the Clinic?
MB3 - Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Texas Ballroom 2-3

Richard M. Grimes, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Medical School, Department of Internal Medicine, Houston, Texas
   This talk will examine the scientific bases for the recommendations on readiness, trust, and adherence that were contained in five HIV treatment guidelines. These concepts will be assessed to determine if there is: 1) an agreed upon definition of the concept, 2) a measure that predicts outcomes, or 3) evidence that a replicable intervention altered outcomes. The talk will discuss the evidence that was contained in five review articles on readiness, trust, and adherence that were published in 2010. The evidence from these reviews will be used to determine if the research base provides data that will allow evidence-based practice to occur in the clinic. This talk is based on an article that will be published in 2013 in the Journal of the International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care.

Session MB3 slides (PDF : 329 kb)

Frontiers in the Research of HIV & STDs
MC3 - Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Hill Country
This session offers continuing education credits.
Khalil G. Ghanem, M.D., Ph.D.; Associate Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Director, STD, HIV, TB Clinical Services, Baltimore City Health Department, Baltimore, Maryland
   This presentation will highlight state-of-the-art approaches for screening, diagnosing, treating, and preventing sexually transmitted infections in persons living with HIV. The latest national guideline recommendations will be reviewed. The latest challenges in the field, including the rapid emergence of drug resistance will be addressed. Areas of controversy will be highlighted and discussed. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the recommended STD screening approach in HIV-infected persons; and
  • Describe biological interventions to reduce the burden of STDs in HIV-infected persons.

Session MC3 slides (PDF : 2,879 kb)

Controlling the Massachusetts HIV Epidemic: The role of expanded Medicaid eligibility for persons with HIV
MD3 - Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Texas Ballroom 1
Kevin Cranston, M.Div., Director, Bureau of Infectious Disease, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
Ann S. Robbins, Ph.D., Manager, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Introduced by Felipe Rocha, M.S.S.W., Manager, TB/HIV/STD/Viral Hepatitis Unit, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
   This presentation will describe the process of obtaining the country’s first Medicaid waiver permitting the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to provide Medicaid coverage to income-eligible persons with HIV (non-AIDS). This material will be framed in the context of the provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act which provides the option to states to expand Medicaid coverage with substantial federal support. The session will review the fiscal, epidemiologic, and practical benefits of expanded HIV Medicaid coverage, with particular reference to the state AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP), efforts to address racial/ethnic disparities in HIV care, and the state’s overall strategy to ensure equitable access to HIV care for all of its residents.

Tuesday, October 30, 2012
Mini Plenary Presentations
10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.

The Future of STD: Prevention and Treatment
MA4 - Tuesday, 10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., Texas Ballroom 1

Gail Bolan, M.D., Director, Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Peter Leone, M.D., Professor of Medicine, UNC School of Medicine; Adjunct Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health; and Medical Director, North Carolina HIV/STD Prevention and Control Branch, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
William Smith, Executive Director, National Coalition of STD Directors (NCSD), Washington, D.C.
   This presentation will address the public health mission and role in reducing sexually transmitted infections. Panelists will discuss how to set up STD clinics to be centers of excellence for STD diagnosis and treatment and sexual health; how STD workers can influence general medical practice; what disease intervention specialist (DIS) work looks like in the future; the proper role of DIS and health departments (in light of and/or regardless of health care reform); and how STD workers can promote an overall sexual health framework. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the public health mission and role in reducing sexually-transmitted infections;
  • Discuss ways in which DIS work must adapt to meet the demands of change;
  • List at least three ways STD workers can influence general medical practice; and
  • List at least three ways STD clinics can promote an overall sexual health framework.

Healing in the Waters: Strategies for Partnering with Faith-Based HIV Prevention Programs
MB4 - Tuesday, 10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., Hill Country
This session offers continuing education credits.
Minister Joseph Collins, City of Austin HIV Planning Council, Black Faith-based Health Initiative, Austin, Texas
Pastor Keely Petty, Bethel International Christian Fellowship, San Antonio, Texas
Elder Deneen Robinson, Managing Elder of External Ministries, Living Faith Covenant Church, Dallas, Texas
   This presentation will provide social workers, AIDS service organizations and local health agencies with strategies for successfully engaging faith-based organizations (churches) as partners in HIV prevention efforts. Each presenter will provide insight to actual HIV prevention programs in their local community which are faith-based in nature and involve partnerships with a wide range of community collaborators. The presenters will present programs which focus on faith-based HIV awareness and literacy, African American women and girls, and methods to introduce HIV testing in church settings. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how to identify community partnerships among faith-based organizations to support HIV prevention efforts.

Session MB4 slides (PDF : 1,029 kb) | Session MB4 Handouts (Zip : 1,709 kb)

Creating Effective HIV Prevention Messages for Gay and Bisexual Men
MC4 - Tuesday, 10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., Texas Ballroom 5-7

Christopher White, Ph.D.
   The purpose of this session is to examine HIV prevention messages targeting gay and bisexual men in the United States, discuss their strengths and weaknesses, and describe the elements of an effective HIV prevention campaign for today. During this session, we will examine print campaigns and watch videos of public service announcements of HIV prevention messages targeted towards gay and bisexual men over the past three decades in the United States. In small groups, participants will discuss the types of messages they saw and list or describe the elements they observed. We will then review HIV prevention messages from other countries and discuss in small groups the differences between these and the U.S. messages. Participants will then describe what they would believe would be an effective, sex-positive, HIV campaign that utilizes a framework of sexual health promotion. Throughout the session, we will cover types of prevention messages, factors that influence what messages are developed (social, political, cultural), and the current CDC initiative to develop a sexual health framework for HIV and STD prevention in the United States.

Stigma and HIV
MD4 - Tuesday, 10:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., Texas Ballroom 2-3

This session offers continuing education credits.
John B. Pryor, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois
   One of the problems in understanding the role of stigma in the HIV epidemic is that the term “stigma” is used in different ways with different meanings. In this presentation, classic uses of the term stigma will be reviewed and then a contemporary conceptual model of stigma will be presented. This model identifies four different manifestations of stigma: public stigma, self-stigma, stigma-by-association, and structural stigma. Each of these manifestations of stigma will be explained with regard to the HIV epidemic. Some illustrative studies of stigma will be presented. Finally, some studies of interventions designed to reduce stigma will be described along with a discussion of the common elements found in effective interventions. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the different manifestations of HIV-related stigma; and
  • Discuss how to address social and environmental influences on health behavior.

Session MD4 slides (PDF : 4,000 kb)

Tuesday, October 30, 2012
Learning Workshops
1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.

Methods and Strategies to Successfully Integrate HIV Testing and Prevention in an African American Faith-Based Environment
A3 - Tuesday, 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., Texas Ballroom 6

Christina Camacho, L.M.S.W., Risk Reduction Coordinator, Austin Travis County Integral Care-Community AIDS Resource and Education (C.A.R.E.) Program, Austin, Texas
Clyde Boyd, Prevention Program Supervisor, Communicable Disease Unit, Austin Travis County Health and Human Services Department, Austin, Texas
Vincetta Green, Co-Programs Director, The Wright House Wellness Center, Austin, Texas Gretchen Hinkle, Prevention Program Manager, AIDS Services of Austin, Austin, Texas
Gretchen Hinkle, Prevention Program Manager, AIDS Services of Austin, Austin, Texas
   One of the most difficult problems in the early identification of HIV seropositive African Americans is motivating sufficiently large numbers to test and receive counseling on the importance of knowing one’s status. Stigma, mistrust of the medical community and a lack of HIV/AIDS awareness all serve as complex barriers to the education, identification and linkage to care of high-risk populations. In Austin, a recent collaboration of faith, community, and government partners implemented a strategy to integrate HIV testing with events scheduled for the local National Week of Prayer for the Healing of AIDS (March 4-10, 2012). The results were nothing short of remarkable. In one afternoon, 345 African American church parishioners were tested for HIV. Throughout the week of activities, a series of events tailored to HIV/AIDS prevention and the reduction of stigma was provided at 16 African American churches. By the end of the week, nearly 450 people of color tested. This workshop features team leaders from this effort who will share methods, strategies, tips, and insight on how faith-based strategies for HIV prevention and testing can be successfully implemented with churches, AIDS service organizations, and governmental health agencies all playing productive roles. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain how to establish a basis for faith-based HIV prevention and testing
  • Describe how to develop effective faith-based partners in the African American community
  • Discuss how to merge the social/professional cultures and goals of churches, ASOs and health agencies
  • List the steps in deploying HIV testing teams at faith-based locations
  • Describe the process of developing and certifying congregational-based testers

Session A3 slides (PDF : 125 kb) | Session A3 handout #1 (PDF : 373 kb)| Session A3 handout #2 (PDF : 200 kb)

Utilizing the Arts to Mobilize and Address Factors Related to the Rise of HIV/AIDS in Texas
B3 - Tuesday, 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., Texas Ballroom 2

This session offers continuing education credits.
Kevin Anderson, Community Outreach and Education Coordinator, AIDS Foundation Houston, Houston, Texas
Harold Steward, Artistic Director, Fahari Arts Institute, Dallas, Texas
   This informative presentation will describe the work of two arts-based community mobilization programs. The Houston-based T.R.U.T.H. Project: Telling Real Unapologetic Truth through Healing and Fahari Arts Institute's Arts and AIDS series,based in Dallas. Both pilot programs work at the intersections of HIV prevention and cultural production in their respective cites. The presenters will share their program’s methodologies and preliminary findings and assist participants in identifying ways this type of mobilization effort might take place within their organization or cities. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the process for assessing the quality and effectiveness of arts based community mobilization programs;
  • Identify potential funding and collaborations for arts based community mobilizations programs in their city; and
  • Describe how to map out arts and cultural assets, needs, opportunities and resources.

Provider Technical Assistance Needs (listening session)
C3 - Tuesday, 1:15 to 2:15 p.m., Big Bend
Mary Chapman McIntosh, M.Ed., Capacity Building Consultant, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP) Capacity Building Branch (CBB) wants our input regarding technical assistance and capacity building assistance for health departments. Specifically, they are looking for:

  • Strategies for implementing HIV prevention interventions for individuals at risk for HIV transmission and acquisition, and
  • Preferences regarding training and technical assistance to address your identified capacity building assistance (CBA) needs

Please join us for this listening session where you will have the opportunity to tell us about your capacity building needs.

Health Care Reform – Preparing for Health Care Reform at a Local Level
D3 - Tuesday, 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., Texas Ballroom 3

This session offers continuing education credits.
Amy Killelea, Senior Manager, Health Care Access, National Association of State and Territorial AIDS Directors, Washington, D.C.
Charles Henley, L.C.S.W., Manager, Ryan White Grant Administration, Harris County Public Health Services, Houston, Texas
   Full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has the potential to significantly expand access to care for people living with HIV in Texas. Through private insurance expansion, expansion of Medicaid eligibility, and investments in prevention, wellness, and health infrastructure, the ACA puts in motion many reforms to our current healthcare system and helps provide the tools to make the prevention, access to care, and health equity goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) a reality. These changes mean that many currently uninsured and underinsured people living with HIV who rely on the Ryan White Program and other safety net care systems as their sole source of care and treatment will have access to health insurance for the first time in 2014. HIV/AIDS organizations and services will need to change and adapt along with this changing health care landscape to ensure that people living with and at risk for HIV have access to vital prevention, care, and treatment services. This presentation will provide an update on federal and state ACA implementation, with a focus on key planning and implementation activities that will need to take place in Texas to ensure that health care reform is able to meet the care and treatment needs of people living with HIV. The presentation will also provide examples of how Ryan White Grantees/Administrative Agencies and local HIV/AIDS service provider agencies can prepare for ACA implementation and ongoing state reform efforts in Texas, as well as discussion of challenges and strategies going forward. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three ways healthcare reform and the ACA may benefit agencies and people living with HIV; and
  • Describe three strategies an Agency may implement to mitigate challenges faced during the implementation of the ACA and healthcare reform.

Session D3 slides (PDF : 88 kb)

HIV Epidemiology Across the Disease Spectrum, Part I
E3 - Tuesday, 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., Texas Ballroom 5

This session offers continuing education credits.
Jennifer A. Chase, M.S.P.H., Epidemiologist, TB/HIV/STD Surveillance Group, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Miranda Fanning, M.P.H., TB/HIV/STD Data Reporting Manager, TB/HIV/STD Surveillance Group, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Margaret Vaaler, Ph.D., Epidemiologist III and Data Team Lead, HIV Care Services Group, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
   This is part one of two sessions detailing the current HIV epidemic in Texas through the integration of multiple data sources. For this session, an overview of data integration and its purpose will be presented followed by a comprehensive review of unmet need. Unmet need is used to estimate the number of people with HIV/AIDS who are not receiving medical care, and are eligible for services under the Ryan White program. The final presentation in this session will be an overview of viral load measures, which a focus on measuring viral load for the in-care population. Viral load measures provide us with an understanding of the quality of care and transmission potential for HIV infected individuals. By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the demographic patterns of HIV clients who have unmet medical needs;
  • Describe trends in HIV clients being linked to care soon after their HIV diagnosis; and
  • Define types of viral load measures.

Session E3 slides (PDF : 1,897 kb) | Session E3 slides 2 (PDF : 774 kb)

Treating Equally: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Inclusivity in Health Care
F3 - Tuesday, 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., Texas Ballroom 1
This session offers continuing education credits.
Shanna Katz, M.Ed., ACS, Sexologist, Kattari Consulting, Denver, Colorado
Leo Kattari, M.S.W., Trainer, Kattari Consulting, Denver, Colorado
   Doctors, nurses, psychologists, physical therapists, front office staff and everyone else in the medical field interact with members of the LGBTQ community on a regular basis, yet members of this community are more likely to be refused health care, be blamed for their medical issues due to their identities, and often choose to avoid health care settings due to these issues. These issues are frequently more prevalent in reproductive care, STI testing and preventative screenings. This workshop covers how to make health care settings more inclusive, providing training on language relating to the LGBTQ community, and how to help medical professionals optimize their workplaces into someplace welcoming to all those needing STI screenings, treatments and health care. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List three interventions that can be implemented to increase awareness and inclusivity of LGBTQ communities.

Session F3 slides (PDF : 1,927 kb)

Who Moved My DEBI? Preparing Your Agency to Fit the New High Impact HIV Prevention Priorities
G3 – Tuesday, 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., Hill Country C–D

This session offers continuing education credits.
Stephen J. Fallon, Ph.D., President, Skills4, Inc., Fort Lauderdale, Florida
   Many staff at CBOs and ASOs working in HIV prevention have questions about how to target their interventions to meet the CDC’s new High Impact Prevention (HIP) priorities. This workshop will present a brief history of major CDC prevention strategy changes, followed by descriptions and case studies that illustrate the meanings of key HIP priorities: how linkage to treatment is intended to ensure reduced infections through Treatment as Prevention; how structural level condom distribution goes further than condom outreach during EBI recruitment; why many states are requiring risk-assessment for eligibility screening for EBIs; why stand-alone funding for HIV testing is being replaced with HIV testing expectations for funded programs. The workshop will then introduce a change management activity, through which participants will learn how to use a “feeling thermometer” to build staff consensus for change, and how to build a timeline for managing an agency’s adaptation to the new priorities. The workshop will close with a foundational activity, illustrating the steps agencies may take to lay the groundwork for new programs. Participants will leave being able to describe how they can incorporate the “test and treat” strategy into their prevention programs, what makes an intervention “structural,” and how they can verify linkages to care. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the rationale and goals behind the CDC's High Impact Prevention approach;
  • Plan strategies to adopt best practices for effectively focusing HIV prevention efforts on communities at risk; and
  • Discuss two strategies to improve staff readiness for program change, expansion or consolidation

Session G3 slides (PDF : 2,795 kb)

New Innovations in TB Testing and Treatment
H3 - Tuesday, 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., Hill Country A-B

This session offers continuing education credits.
Lisa Y. Armitige, M.D., Ph.D., Medical Consultant, Heartland National TB Center, San Antonio, Texas
   This presentation will review new diagnostics and therapeutics available for management of tuberculosis in patients with HIV. The lecture targets HIV and STD health care providers and will provide much needed education and discussion regarding new diagnostics and treatment modalities for TB. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe new diagnostics and treatments for TB as they relate to HIV-infected patients, including identifying gaps in understanding of use of new TB modalities in TB/HIV co-infected patients.

Rethinking “MSM”
I3 - Tuesday, 1:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., Texas Ballroom 7

Chris Bartlett, Executive Director, The William Way Community Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Tuesday, October 30, 2012
Learning Workshops
2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Community Assessment
A4 - Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Big Bend
This session offers continuing education credits.
Kimberly A. Parker, Ph.D., M.P.H., C.H.E.S., Assistant Professor, Department of Health Studies, Texas Woman’s University, Denton, Texas
La Shonda Worthey, B.S., STD/HIV Program Manager, Dallas County Health and Human Services, Dallas, Texas
   The Texas Black Women’s Initiative (TXBWI) was developed as a statewide collaboration to address the impact of HIV/AIDS in the State of Texas. With support from the National Association of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD) and DSHS, regional teams were developed across the state to develop and implement region specific interventions for African American women. The Dallas Regional Team systematically assessed the needs of African American based on attitudes, knowledge and beliefs about HIV/AIDS, HIV testing and the availability of HIV/AIDS resources. This presentation will (1) illustrate the impact of HIV/AIDS in Texas and in Dallas County; (2) review the steps of conducting a needs assessment and assessing the needs of African American women in Dallas County; (3) provide the results from a needs assessment conducted with African American women in Dallas on knowledge, attitude and beliefs about HIV/AIDS and perceived representation in social marketing materials used to address HIV/AIDS and (4) discuss how results from the needs assessment will influence future initiatives for African American women in Dallas. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the impact of HIV/AIDS among Black women in Texas and in Dallas County; and
  • Describe the goals and efforts of the Texas Black Women’s Initiative and Dallas Regional Team.

Session A4 slides (PDF : 1,810 kb)

Creating a Home-Grown Intervention: The T.R.U.T.H. Project and PILLAR Project
B4 - Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Texas Ballroom 1
This session offers continuing education credits.
Manuel G. “Manny” Sanchez, Jr., M.A., HIV/AIDS/STD Program Director, City of Laredo Health Department, Laredo, Texas
Arturo Diaz, Jr, C.P.M., City of Laredo Health Department, Laredo, Texas
Nike Blue, M.P.H., Director of Prevention Services, AIDS Foundation Houston, Inc., Houston, Texas
   This presentation will educate people on how to develop and implement community mobilization projects within their own communities using two examples: the PILLAR Project, in Laredo and the T.R.U.T.H. Project, in Houston. The presenters will provide information on their experiences with implementing these strategies in a border city and urban area where openly addressing issues like HIV, being GLBTQ, being a minority, stigma, discrimination, bullying and more is taboo. Detailed information about the processes, accomplishments, shortcomings, and barriers encountered with these strategies will be highlighted. The relationship between gaps in mental health services and HIV prevention and treatment activities will be discussed and connected to the overall work being done by the PILLAR project. Ways to empower the African American GLBTQ community and allies in an all-inclusive platform that uses performance arts as an instrument of healing, from awareness to action, will be covered by the T.R.U.T.H. Project. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how to effectively implement and use community conversations to address HIV related needs in a community;
  • Identify ways to use non-traditional methods to introduce HIV prevention discussions into previously restricted environments, i.e. school settings, church groups, etc.;
  • Identify ways to increase early HIV detection and linkage to HIV care services among young men who have sex with men; and
  • Identify innovative ways to engage communities around social issues to support HIV prevention.

Session B4 slides 1 (PDF : 2,131 kb) | Session B4 slides 2 (PDF : 540 kb)

Patient Navigation Systems
C4 - Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Texas Ballroom 3

This session offers continuing education credits.
Amy Killelea, Senior Manager, Health Care Access, National Association of State and Territorial AIDS Directors, Washington, D.C.
Jamie Schield, B.S., M.P.H.A., Planning Coordinator, North Central Texas HIV Planning Council, Fort Worth, Texas
   Patient Navigators play a crucial role in linking people living with HIV to critical medical and support services. The role of patient navigators will become even more important as more insurance coverage options become available in 2014 through implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). This presentation will provide an overview of the basics of a Patient Navigator program, what the funding options are for these programs, and how these programs can be designed in ways that meet the needs of a particular community. The presentation will also include information about the innovative Patient Navigator program launched in the Fort Worth area in 2007, including discussion of the role of client feedback, case manager involvement, and collaboration with the DSHS workgroup on Case Management in the design and implementation of the Fort Worth program. Currently Patient Navigator programs in the North Central Texas region support navigators in clinical and non-clinical settings; urban and rural; and, have been implemented with the redistribution of allocations from non-medical case management to patient navigation and provide lessons for design and implementation of similar programs in other parts of the state. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how the two models of patient navigators have been implemented;
  • Identify three types of data necessary to determine the need for a patient navigator program; and
  • Describe how Patient Navigators have been effective in getting and keeping clients in medical care.

Session C4 slides (PDF : 243 kb)

Health Care Reform – How to Become a Medicaid Provider
D4 - Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Texas Ballroom 6
Michelle Harper, Director of Acute Care Policy, Medicaid/CHIP Program, Health and Human Services Commission, Austin, Texas

HIV Epidemiology Across the Disease Spectrum, Part II
E4 - Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Texas Ballroom 5

This session offers continuing education credits.
Craig L. K. Boge, M.P.H., Epidemiologist, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Jennifer A. Chase, M.S.P.H., Epidemiologist, TB/HIV/STD Surveillance Group, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Jonathon Poe, M.S.S.W., Manager, HIV Information Program Group, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Kasey Russell, M.P.H., Epidemiologist, TB/HIV/STD Surveillance Group, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
   This is part two of two sessions detailing the current HIV epidemic in Texas through the integration of multiple data sources. For this session, an overview of data integration and its purpose will be presented, followed by a comprehensive review of Program Collaboration and Service Integration, an initiative which reviews and analyzes data on people co-infected with HIV and an STD or TB to determine what demographic and risk groups are impacted by HIV/STD/TB co-infections. Following this is a presentation that will describe the epidemiology of HIV-positive women and perinatally exposed infants in Texas. Factors that lead to perinatal HIV transmission such as: lack of prenatal care, timing of HIV diagnosis and inadequate antiretroviral therapy will be addressed. The final presentation in this session will describe the epidemiology of death among the Texas HIV/AIDS population and identify leading causes of death within this population. This will include an investigation into the changing distribution of causes of death over time. As cases become more likely to be connected with services and treatment, the likelihood of dying from a chronic condition rather than one directly related to a HIV infection increases. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the epidemiology of HIV among high-risk populations in Texas;
  • Describe surveillance systems used to capture HIV and STD related data;
  • Describe perinatal HIV surveillance in Texas;
  • Describe the factors that lead to perinatal HIV transmission;
  • Identify methods to prevent perinatal HIV transmission;
  • Describe the leading causes of death attributed to HIV/AIDS cases;
  • Describe changes in cause of death rates within the HIV/AIDS population over 5 years, 2004-2009;
  • Identify demographic groups with lower survival rates over time after AIDS diagnosis; and
  • Identify potential risk factors that result in not surviving more than three years after AIDS diagnosis.

STD Sexual History Taking
F4 – Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Texas Ballroom 7

This session offers continuing education credits.
Teri S. Anderson, MT (ASCP), Associate Clinical Training Coordinator, Denver STD/HIV Prevention Training Center, Denver, Colorado
   This presentation will discuss the importance for taking a thorough STD sexual history and CDC’s framework, called “The 5 Ps for Taking a Sexual History.” Participants will learn how to introduce the sexual history, what to ask of each patient and how to ask sensitive sexuality questions to determine risk for STDs and unplanned pregnancy. Skills practice with clinician-patient scenarios will conclude this session. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe four important components of obtaining a sexual history;
  • List the five components of getting a sexual history; and
  • Identify three techniques used in asking sensitive sexuality questions (how to ask).

Session F4 slides (PDF : 3,122 kb)

Advocacy Matters: Building Strong Coalition Members
G4 - Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Hill Country A-B
This session offers continuing education credits.
Januari Leo, M.S.W., Public Affairs Field Specialist, Legacy Community Health Services, Houston, Texas
   The goal of this presentation is to begin to build strong advocates, to answer any questions and dispel any myths that might hold someone back, and to create a safe environment for growth and experimentation. Advocates will leave with a greater understanding of their comfort level when it comes to participating in advocacy activities, and will have several different means to choose from. The speakers will discuss advocacy versus lobbying, the Texas legislative process, and how to communicate effectively via personal testimony and visits, letters, phone calls and e-mails. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Distinguish the difference between advocacy and lobbying; and
  • Describe the Texas legislative process.

Session G4 slides (PDF : 400 kb)

Building a Community-Based Transgender Health Clinic
H4 - Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Hill Country C–D

This session offers continuing education credits.
Nell Gaither, Trans Pride Initiative, Dallas, Texas
This presentation will discuss the development of a volunteer-based transgender health clinic, including what was learned about meeting the health needs of the transgender population and the integration of HIV/STD services into the clinic. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the health and medical needs of transgender individuals; and
  • List the steps used in developing a transgender health clinic.

Session H4 slides (PDF : 1,008 kb) | Session H4 brochure (PDF : 1,155 kb)

HIV Epidemic among Black MSM
I4 - Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Texas 2

Lamont Scales, M.A., N.C.C., Coordinator for Gay, Bisexual, and Other MSM Activities, Office of Health Equity, Office of the Director, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia

Tuesday, October 30, 2012
Learning Workshops
3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

Courageous Conversations about Race and Racism
A5 - Tuesday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., Texas Ballroom 1
This session offers continuing education credits.
Joyce James, L.M.S.W., Associate Deputy Executive Commissioner, Center for Elimination of Disproportionality and Disparities, Texas Health and Human Services Commission, Austin, Texas
   Race and institutionalized racism are at the core of disproportionate and disparate health outcomes for vulnerable communities and communities of color. In this session, participants will examine cross systems data that show the relationship that systems have to poor communities and communities of color, continuing to produce disparate health outcomes for the same vulnerable populations. Professional development will be enhanced by giving participants an understanding of how institutionalized racism is unconsciously upheld in systems through policies and practices and by providing an introduction to the Texas Model for addressing disproportionality and disparities, which will offer participants a set of core values that promote systems change. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: 

  • Explain the underlying cause of disproportionality and disparities in institutionalized racism;
  • Describe the impact of institutionalized racism on HIV in communities of color
  • Describe the importance of applying critical thinking skills that address race and racism that result in ethical choices

Introduction to Foundations in HIV Counseling and Testing (FCT)
B5 - Tuesday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., Hill Country C-D
This session offers continuing education credits.
Sharita Ambrose, M.P.H., Training Specialist, Cardea, Austin, Texas
Connie Folse, M.P.H., Training Specialist, Cardea, Austin, Texas
   This session will highlight the newly required standards for all new DSHS HIV prevention counseling/testing staff. This session will help participants understand the differences between Protocol Based Counseling (PBC) and Foundations of HIV Counseling and Testing (FCT). The goal of this session is to inform supervisors and experienced staff of the updated changes in HIV testing options, follow-up procedure, and linkage to care. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List three differences between Protocol Based Counseling and Foundations in HIV Counseling and Testing;
  • Identify where on the continuum of care use of the PBC protocol is appropriate; and
  • Describe DSHS policy regarding linkage to care and patient follow up after delivering an HIV positive result.

Session B5 slides (PDF : 723 kb)

Women’s’ HEART - Timely Entry, Access, and Retention in HIV Treatment for Women of Color
C5 - Tuesday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., Texas Ballroom 6
This session offers continuing education credits.
Veronica A. Villela-Perez, B.A., Project Coordinator, Division of Community Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
   This presentation will provide an overview of the Women’s HEART Project, specifically how three agencies have come together to provide timely entry, access, and retention into treatment for women of color. The presentation will provide information on using medical coordination, patient navigation, intensive outreach and peer education to retain clients in care. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two strategies to ensure recruitment and retention in care and treatment for women of color living with HIV; and
  • Describe two strategies that support and ensure adherence to treatment for women of color living with HIV.

Insurance 101 and Educating Clients on Insurance Enrollment
D5 - Tuesday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., Texas Ballroom 7
This session offers continuing education credits.
Melissa Hield, Associate Commissioner, Texas Department of Insurance, Austin, Texas
   This presentation will provide an introduction to how health insurance works, an overview of federal health reform provisions, and information about the Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan. The presentation also includes scenarios about people living with HIV and assistance available for them. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three key provisions of federal health reform; and
  • Identify what the Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) is, how persons living with HIV can qualify for PCIP, and how they can apply for coverage.

Session D5 slides (PDF : 1,931 kb) | Session D5 handouts (PDF : 85 kb)

Perinatal HIV/STD Issues
E5 – Tuesday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., Texas Ballroom 3
This session offers continuing education credits.

Part I: Recent Changes in Perinatal HIV Prevention Testing and Treatment
Janak A. Patel, M.D., Professor, Department of Pediatrics and Director, Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease and Immunology, Children’s Hospital, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas
   This presentation will review the recent changes in the national guidelines for perinatal HIV testing and prevention. Specific rationales for the changes will be discussed as well as the need for education of the clinicians providing care to HIV-positive pregnant women and their newborn infants. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the recent changes in perinatal HIV testing and prevention guidelines;
  • Identify the specific HIV medication regimens recommended for HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborn infants; and
  • Describe the methods to incorporate changes in clinical practice.

Part II: Perinatal HIV Testing Policies, Practices and HIV/Syphilis Perinatal Screening Levels in Texas Hospitals
Sharon K. Melville, M.D., M.P.H., Manager, TB/HIV/STD Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, TB/HIV/STD/Viral Hepatitis Unit, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
   This presentation will include an overview of the epidemiology of perinatal transmission of HIV and syphilis in Texas; an overview of the Texas perinatal testing law; and a discussion of a study addressing policies and practices of Texas hospitals related to the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV and the level of HIV and syphilis screening of pregnant women prenatally and at delivery. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the epidemiology of perinatal HIV and congenital syphilis in Texas;
  • Describe the Texas perinatal testing law; and
  • Discuss the policies and practices of Texas hospitals related to prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV and the level of HIV and syphilis screening of pregnant women prenatally and at delivery.

Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS through Fighting Stigma
F5 – Tuesday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., Big Bend
This session offers continuing education credits.
Kadidiatou Magassa, Face AIDS - Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas
Meagan Moore, Face AIDS - Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas
   This presentation takes information from two sets of research to examine the effects of stigma on the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS. Stigma comes in many forms and affects the disease in just as many ways. In Arica, Chile, evidence of stigma and other social factors have been associated with the rate of adherence to antiretroviral treatment. In Maseru, Lesotho, another set of data demonstrates how youth living with HIV/AIDS are given relief of stigma through programming of the Baylor College of Medicine International Pediatric AIDS Initiative. Through examination of the two examples of research, the effects of stigma can be seen, but a course of action is also set for eliminating the burden. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe examples and effects of stigma related to HIV/AIDS;
  • Identify ways to combat stigma through social support;
  • Describe adherence to antiretroviral medication; and
  • Identify three ways to enhance advocacy for HIV prevention.

The Write Stuff: Writing Skills for Crafting Grant Proposals
G5 - Tuesday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., Hill Country A-B
This session offers continuing education credits.
Loretta Holland, C.F.R.E., Executive Director, Waterloo Counseling Center, Austin, Texas
   Grant writers are often confused about word choice, tone and making a compelling case while answering the funder’s questions. In their urgency to have the proposal funded, grant writers may resort to emotional writing, over use client stories or stumble into “writing traps” like flowery or stuffy language, hyperbole and marketing messages. The result is a narrative that says too much and nothing, all at the same time. Participants will learn to avoid common “writing traps,” and to produce easy to understand narrative that requires less effort from the reviewer. Removing these writing traps from your narrative can be a space (and life!) saver when you are facing page, word, or character limits. Grant writers will learn how to write for their reader; gain confidence in their writing skills; learn the art of self-editing; discover how to get better, more effective feedback from their coworkers; and recognize “trigger” words that define poor writing. Participants will go home with job aids, such as checklists, that they can refer to as they write. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the four major components of writing a successful grant.

Session G5 slides (PDF : 383 kb) | Session G5 handout #1 (PDF : 122 kb) | Session G5 handout #2 (PDF : 305 kb)

Building and Leading a Collaborative Effort to Reach Today’s Youth
H5 - Tuesday, 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., Texas Ballroom 2
This session offers continuing education credits.
Melvin C. Carter III, Project Director, Comin 'Up Gang Intervention Program, Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Fort Worth, Fort Worth, Texas
Dawn Dickerson-Sankofa, M.P.H., Health Equity Coordinator, Tarrant County Public Health, Fort Worth, Texas
Mark Wilson, Division Manager, Adult Health Services, Tarrant County Public Health, Fort Worth, Texas
   This presentation will discuss current trends in STD/HIV infections among today’s youth age 14-24, in half the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. With an understanding of the problem, one solution to reach today’s youth, with age appropriate information, to help reduce potential new cases and increase STD/HIV awareness will be discussed. The discussion will provide a roadmap to replication of this evidence-based intervention for other programs around the country. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Determine when the identification of alternate methods is necessary to improve the dissemination of STD/HIV information and education in your community;
  • Identify local venues where STD/HIV information can be provided to youth in an open discussion;
  • Identify ways of increasing STD/HIV awareness in youth; and
  • Identify methods for youth to enhance advocacy for STD/HIV prevention.

Tuesday, October 30, 2012
Affinity Sessions
6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

S3 - Innovation Group, Texas Ballroom 7
S4 - Latinos and HIV, Texas Ballroom 5
S5 - Routine HIV Testing in Healthcare Settings, Texas Ballroom 3
S6 - Public Health Follow-Up and Surveillance, Texas Ballroom 2
S7 - Post-Incarceration Linkage to Care, Texas Ballroom 6
S8 - Perinatal HIV, Big Bend
S9 - Texas Black Women’s Initiative, Texas Ballroom 1

 


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Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Wednesday, October 31, 2012
Learning Workshops
8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

Routine HIV Testing in Healthcare Settings
A7 - Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Texas Ballroom 2
This session offers continuing education credits.
Cordella Lyon, R.N., HIV Screening Coordinator, Baptist Hospitals of South East Texas, Beaumont, Texas
James J. McCarthy, M.D., F.A.C.E.P., Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas Medical School- Houston, Medical Director, Emergency Center, Memorial Hermann Hospital - Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas
Nancy Miertschin, M.P.H., HIV Projects Manager, Thomas Street Health Center, Harris Health Systems, Houston, Texas
Jenny R. McFarlane, Session Moderator, Routine HIV Testing and Perinatal Prevention Coordinator, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
   This presentation will review the experiences of hospital emergency departments implementing routine testing for HIV. Each presenter will discuss their experiences, including what was successful and the barriers they faced. They will also discuss linkage to care and establishment of medical home for patients, the importance of community partnerships, and cost. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe two best practices for implementing routine HIV testing in a health care setting;
  • Identify two models for successfully linking HIV positive patients to care services; and
  • Identify three ways to enhance community partnerships for the continuum of HIV diagnosis to care for HIV.

Session A7 slides (PDF : 381 kb) | Session A7 slides #2 (PDF : 571 kb)

Outcome Monitoring: Approaches for EBIs and CRCS (with CLEAR)
B7 - Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Texas Ballroom 7
This session offers continuing education credits.
Ken Ripperger-Suhler, Ph.D., Research Associate III, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
Chris Mobley, M.Ed., Senior Program Consultant, HIV/STD Program, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Amanda Reese, HIV Prevention Consultant, HIV/STD Program, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Wayne Allen, B.A., Program Manager, Wellness Pointe, Longview, Texas
M. Elaine Rogers, B.A., L.C.D.C./A.A.C., CRCS Counselor, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas
   This session will discuss the guidelines and current approaches to outcome monitoring for both EBIs and CRCS. Discussions will feature the outcome monitoring coordinator discussing lessons learned over three years, as well as contractors and their DSHS Prevention Consultants discussing approaches to and usefulness of outcome monitoring from their perspectives. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the Texas DSHS guidelines for outcome monitoring;
  • Discuss an example of the application of outcome monitoring data for program improvement;
  • Describe a potential approach to integrating CLEAR into the CRCS process; and
  • Describe one approach to assessing the concepts of CLEAR within the CRCS process.

Integrating and Supporting Medical Case Management into Primary Care
C7 - Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Texas Ballroom 5
Ruby Chapman, B.S.N., R.N., Nursing Coordinator, Thomas Street Health Center, Houston, Texas
Leigh Jarrell Arrington, L.B.S.W., Program Director, SPCAA Project CHAMPS, Lubbock, Texas
Ricky L. Vaughn, L.B.S.W., M.P.H., Lead Medical Case Manager, SPCAA Project CHAMPS, Lubbock, Texas
Christopher Bolinger, M.S., CF-SLP, Acute Care Speech Pathologist, University Medical Center, Lubbock, Texas
   This presentation will highlight how SPCAA Project CHAMPS has integrated medical case management into its established outpatient ambulatory HIV clinic located at the Texas Tech Health Sciences Center in Lubbock. Through careful planning, contract negotiations and the fundamental element of physician “buy-in,” SPCAA Project CHAMPS has been successful in incorporating medical case management as the leading component in the coordination and facilitation of medical and social support services for clients in their care. Project CHAMPS’ clinical structure is composed of a multidisciplinary medical treatment team with individuals from various related specialties. As part of the multidisciplinary team, the medical case manager has the specific role of assisting clients in following their medical treatment plan. The Medical Case Manager’s function in the HIV clinic is that of a case manager and he/she is physically available during the clinic to address client issues such as medication compliance, adherence and risk reduction; provide patient education; and act as a liaison between physicians, nurses and other clinic staff and SPCAA Project CHAMPS’ clients with the goal of ensuring continuity of HIV medical treatment and care as well as to improve HIV-related health outcomes for clients. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe a process of integrating medical case management into a multidisciplinary HIV treatment team.
  • List possible disciplines and their respective functions in a multidisciplinary HIV treatment team.
  • Identify the roles of the medical case manager in the HIV clinical setting.
  • Describe the importance of establishing, building upon and cultivating functional relationships between administrators of all agencies involved.
  • Identify barriers and potential solutions.

Session C7 slides #1 (PDF : 715 kb) | Session C7 slides #2 (PDF : 532 kb)

Ensuring Linkage to Care for Recently Released HIV-Positive Inmates
D7 - Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Hill Country A–B
Janina Vazquez, Care Services Group Manager, HIV/STD Prevention and Care Branch, Austin, Texas
Patrick L. Martin, Program Development Director, Houston Regional HIV/AIDS Resource Group, Houston, Texas
Anna Henry, Planner, Houston Regional HIV/AIDS Resource Group, Houston, Texas
   More HIV-positive offenders are released into Harris County than any other area in Texas, and over 1,000 local jail inmates are HIV-positive. While incarcerated, PLWHA receive HIV care, but there is a lack of continuity of care post-release. The Serving the Incarcerated and Recently Released (SIRR) Partnership was formed in 2009 to fortify the Houston system of HIV care at reentry. Its work includes the region’s first conference on engagement strategies, the allocation of EIS funds for reentry linkage to care, and training for parole and probation. SIRR is now evaluating its impact on the continuum of care overall. This workshop will describe the process and outcomes of a community-based IRR coalition as well as “lessons learned” for an effective reentry system of HIV care.

Session D7 slides (PDF : 749 kb)

Spatial Analyses of HIV in Texas
E7 - Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Big Bend
This session offers continuing education credits.
Sonia Arbona, Ph.D., Medical Geographer, Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas
Joseph R. Oppong, Ph.D., Professor of Geography, Associate Graduate Dean, Department of Geography, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas
Chetan Tiwari, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, University of North Texas Denton, Texas
   This presentation will show the distribution of HIV in the context of social determinants of health, specifically social and economic variables in selected metropolitan areas with high number of people living with HIV. The analysis investigates the type and extent of the spatial association between the variables. The focus of the analysis is local and identifies neighborhoods where these associations are present. Since the location and distribution of the variables under consideration are not readily discernible when pooling data at the state or regional level, this analysis informs policy development and resource planning at the local level. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe current epidemiology of HIV and STDs in Texas;
  • Develop awareness of current issues and best practices for surveillance of HIV/STD; and
  • Describe best practices for effectively focusing HIV prevention efforts on communities at risk.

Session E7 slides (PDF : 2,315 kb)

Sexual Risk Behavior Among MSM Couples
F7 - Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Texas Ballroom 1
This session offers continuing education credits.
Jason W. Mitchell, M.P.H., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Health Promotion and Risk Reduction Programs, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
   This presentation will highlight findings from previous and current HIV prevention studies with gay male couples in the U.S. In particular, the presenter will discuss how a variety of relationship characteristics affect gay male couples’ risk for acquiring HIV and STIs, as well as: couples’ attitudes toward using newer technologies for HIV prevention. These newer technologies include pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), couples-based voluntary counseling and testing (CVCT), and home-based rapid HIV testing, among others. More in-depth analyses of couples’ attitudes toward using these newer technologies will be discussed in detail. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe findings from previous and current HIV prevention studies with gay male couples in the U.S.;
  • Discuss how a variety of relationship characteristics affect gay male couples’ risk for acquiring HIV and STDs; and
  • Discuss couples’ attitudes toward using newer technologies for HIV prevention, including pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), couples-based voluntary counseling and testing (CVCT), home-based rapid HIV testing and others.

Developing Community Collaboration and Mobilization Strategies to Provide Innovative and Enhanced HIV/STD Intervention Services
G7 - Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Hill Country C–D
Michael Thomas, STD Program Project Coordinator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of HIV/STD and Viral Hepatitis Prevention, Houston, Texas Department of State Health Services
Lupita Thornton, B.S.B./M., STD Program Project Coordinator, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
Marlene McNeese-Ward, Bureau Chief, HIV/STD and Viral Hepatitis Prevention, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, Texas
   The Houston Department of Health and Human Services Bureau of HIV/STD and Viral Hepatitis Prevention develops and maintains effective and strategic partnerships with a variety of community-based agencies, which enables the Bureau to promote STD/HIV intervention activities ranging from community coalitions that target specialized populations to routine opt-out HIV testing in hospital emergency rooms. The discussion will provide information on developing coalitions and mobilizing community-based agencies to enhance the Bureau’s STD/HIV intervention efforts. Specific emphasis will be given to describing how the Houston Health Department effectively utilizes community collaborations to provide comprehensive STD services during HIP HOP for HIV Awareness event, the nation’s largest mass HIV testing event. The presentation will describe how the Bureau partners with both internal health department divisions and external agencies, using the National Incidence Command Structure to maximize program efficiency. The presentation will provide detailed data and results from the 2011 HIP HOP for HIV Awareness Event.

STDs 2012: Hot Topics and Burning Issues
I7 - Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., Texas Ballroom 2-3
Cornelis A. “Kees” Rietmeijer, M.D., Ph.D., M.S.P.H., Professor, Community and Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado

Wednesday, October 31, 2012
Closing Keynote Address and Luncheon
10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Closing Keynote Address
Joan Borysenko, Ph.D.

Presentation of the Texas HIV/STD Student Research Award
Rachel Wiseman, Texas Public Health Association
Sharon K. Melville, M.D., M.P.H., Department of State Health Services

Closing Comments and Luncheon
Ann S. Robbins, Ph.D.

 


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2012 Texas HIV/STD Conference


 

Last updated November 16, 2012