IDCU HomeInfectious Diseases A-CD-GH-LM-QR-ST-ZIDCU Health TopicsDisease ReportingRelated Rules & RegulationsImmunization BranchAbout IDCURelated DSHS SitesStaff Contact List
  • Loading...
    Contact Us

    Infectious Disease Control Unit
    Mail Code: 1960
    PO BOX 149347 - Austin, TX 78714-9347
    1100 West 49th Street, Suite T801
    Austin, TX 78714

    Phone: 512 776 7676
    Fax: (512) 776-7616


    E-mail

Hepatitis A Resources

Loading...
HEPATITIS A(2)

 

Home      FAQs     Data   Reporting     Investigation     Immunization     

 

Communication Toolkit for Hepatitis A

The following materials have been designed for use by local and regional health departments in Texas to address hepatitis A. Most of the documents have been made available in .doc format so that they can be modified as needed by each jurisdiction. Documents intended for the public (as opposed to healthcare professionals) have been translated into Spanish.

Hepatitis A Fact Sheet: English (PDF) Spanish (PDF)

The target population for the fact sheet is the general public. It can be used as a handout at conferences, given to cases and contacts, given by physicians to patients, and placed on websites. The fact sheet can also be found online at:

English: http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/A/PDFs/HepAGeneralFactSheet.pdf

Spanish: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/hepa/downloads/PL-dis-hepa-color-office-sp.pdf

Letter to Physicians (Health Alert): Health Alert Letter (.doc)

Once an outbreak or common/large exposure is identified, it is vital to notify local area physicians and hospitals as soon as possible. There are multiple purposes for this letter:

  • To reduce transmission of hepatitis A during an outbreak or common/large exposure by raising the physician’s index of suspicion for hepatitis A, thereby identifying patients appropriately.
  • To ensure complete and prompt reporting by healthcare providers.
  • To ensure appropriate testing and prophylaxis of hepatitis A suspects and contacts, and appropriate exclusion from school/work for cases.
  • To remind health care providers of the importance of vaccinating patients appropriately.

Given the specific situation, certain aspects of the letter can be removed or highlighted (e.g. in an undervaccinated community, the immunizations piece may be the most critical).

The letter should be sent out under local health authority/local health department letterhead whenever possible. During an outbreak or common/large exposure, it is recommended that all pediatricians, family practice physicians, internists, infectious disease physicians, nurse practitioners, general practitioners, gastroenterologists, obstetricians/gynecologists, hospitals, and urgent care facilities within the local jurisdiction be notified of the outbreak or common /large exposure. Generally, the scope of the alert should not be limited to a small geographic area (zip code, school district, etc.) because many clients travel outside of their residential area to visit their physician of choice. In some cases, the regional office may need to send out letters to surrounding counties. Please let your DSHS regional office and central office know if you distribute a health alert.

Hepatitis A Vaccine Recommendations: English    Spanish

This handout can be included with the letter to physicians, given as a handout to the public, or used on the web. This handout is intended primarily for healthcare providers but can be used to provide summary hepatitis A vaccine information to anyone interested. The source for the content of this handout was found at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5507a1.htm

Notification Letter: English     Spanish singular form    Spanish plural form

The letter is meant to inform people about a potential exposure to hepatitis A. Letters should (1) notify about the potential exposure, (2) educate on how to recognize signs and symptoms of hepatitis A, (3) provide information about vaccination and prophylaxis, and (4) provide information about how to protect selves. This letter can be sent from the exposed facility or the local health authority/local health department or both. Please note there are two versions in Spanish—one is singular to be used when one person has been exposed in a household, one is plural for when a family or household members have been exposed.

Hepatitis A Press Release: News organizations will be interested in running stories about hepatitis A during outbreaks or common/large exposures. The document provides some suggestions for key points to include in a press release or news story. Many example articles can be found by conducting an internet search on hepatitis A. If you plan to issue a press release, please share a copy with your DSHS regional office and central office, as we may also receive media questions.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Infectious Diseases
CDC en Espanol - Hepatitis; Educational Materials; Surveillance; Vaccine; Vaccine Schedules ...
  • Viral Hepatitis A Fact Sheet
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Infectious Diseases
    Signs & Symptoms; Cause; Long-Term Effects; Transmission; Persons at Risk of Infection; Prevention; Vaccine Recommendations ...
  • Pink Book's chapter on Hepatitis A (PDF PDF File)
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Immunization Program
    Hepatitis A information from Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases, The Pink Book.
  • The International Hepatitis Foundation
    Hepatitis Foundation International
    Newsletter; Living with Hepatitis; Online Learning Center; Resource Center; Education ...
  • Epidemiology and Prevention of Viral Hepatitis A to E: An Overview
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Infectious Diseases
    Hepatitis A ...
  • Hepatitis A Can Be Prevented (PDF PDF File: 126KB)
    An overview of Hepatitis A; Signs and Symptoms; Treatment; Prevention
  •  
     
     
     

     

    • Loading...
    Last updated April 09, 2014