COVID-19 Vaccine Information

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Who's Eligible to Get the Vaccine Now?

School and Child Care Personnel Now Eligible To Be Vaccinated

With the federal directive, the following education and child care personnel are now eligible to be vaccinated in Texas:

  • Those who work in pre-primary, primary, and secondary schools;
  • Head Start and Early Head Start programs (including teachers, staff, and bus drivers); and
  • Those who work as or for licensed child care providers, including center-based and family care providers.

Phase 1A: Front-line healthcare workers and residents at long-term care facilities

Phase 1B: People 65+ or people 16+ with a health condition that increases risk of severe COVID‑19 illness, including but not limited to:

  • Cancer
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
  • Down Syndrome
  • Heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathies
  • Organ transplantation
  • Obesity
  • Pregnancy
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Type 2 diabetes

If you have a medical condition not listed above, you may still qualify for the vaccine. Talk to your provider to confirm.

Spring 2021 is the best estimate of when vaccines will be available for the general public. Availability will depend on vaccine supply. Check back here for updates.


Where to Get Vaccinated

If you’re eligible to get vaccinated now, you can check with a large vaccination hub and/or a local vaccine provider, like a nearby pharmacy or your doctor.

Find Vaccine:

Large Vaccination Hubs Vaccine Availability Map List of All Providers

When searching for a vaccination site, remember:

  • Vaccine supply is limited. Not all local providers have vaccine each week and hubs may have long waiting lists.
  • Do not show up at a hub or provider looking for a vaccine.
  • Instead, check the provider’s website. Call only if the website doesn’t answer your questions.

Do you know someone who is eligible for a vaccine but doesn’t have internet access? Please let them know they can call 2‑1‑1 for referral to a local vaccine provider.

Vaccine supply is still limited in Texas, but more arrives each week.


Important to Know

Two Doses

Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines both require two doses. It’s best if you get your second dose from the same brand as your first dose. For example, if you got a Moderna first dose, it’s best to get Moderna for your second dose.

The timing between your first and second dose depends on which vaccine you received:

  • Moderna: 4 to 6 weeks after your first dose
  • Pfizer: 3 to 6 weeks after your first dose
If you got a Moderna first dose, it's best to get the Moderna second dose 4-6 weeks after your first dose. If you got a Pfizer first dose, it's best to get the Pfizer second dose 3-6 weeks after your first dose.

Side Effects & Allergic Reactions

Mild side effects are normal signs your body is building protection, and they usually go away after a few days. The chance of a severe reaction is less than 0.5%. To be safe, your provider will have you wait on-site for 15-30 minutes after your shot.

V-safe: Register with CDC's V-safe After Vaccination Health Checker on your smartphone to report any side effects after getting the COVID-19 vaccine. You’ll also get reminders for your second vaccine dose.


Texas Vaccine Rollout Timeline

Vaccine timeline. We are currently in Phase one: direct care worker and long-term care residents.

Texas continues to receive doses of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, and is distributing statewide to hospitals, pharmacies, local health departments, freestanding ERs, and other clinics.

Spring 2021 is the best estimate of when vaccine will be available for the general public, but that may change. It depends on vaccine production and how quickly other vaccines become available. Please check this page regularly for updates.

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Last updated March 3, 2021