Funding Alert Vol. 24 No. 10 Alert # 3 - October 15, 2013

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Funding News and Grant Tips

Nonprofits Brace for Fallout From Government Shutdown
The impact of the shutdown of the federal government on the nonprofit sector — ranging from belt-tightening to staff furloughs and the suspension of services — will depend on how long the impasse continues, the NonProfit Times reports.
"It all depends: is it two days, two weeks, two months? If it's two days, everyone presumes life will go on," said David L. Thompson, vice president of public policy at the National Council of Nonprofits. "When government backs out and government offices close, people turn to nonprofits. Churches and frontline nonprofits are going to gear up, alert staff and volunteers that the load going to increase....[N]onprofits will keep going as long as they can."
Russell Spain, executive director of the Eastern Idaho Community Action Partnership, an anti-poverty group, told the Chronicle of Philanthropy that if the budget impasse is not resolved by October 14, 10 to 12 staff members whose salaries are covered by federal grants will be furloughed and the organization will have to close a shelter for women and children, stop delivering food to 15 food banks, and suspend a plan to launch an energy assistance program.
Catholic Charities of Wichita has decided to cover the costs of lost federal funding to keep its shelters and other programs open, the Wichita Eagle reports. "The services provided by the agency in central and southeast Kansas are too vital to the thousands of clients it serves, accompanies, and defends, and the staffs of these programs are too essential to furlough its employees or cancel scheduled programming," the agency's executive director, Michael Burrus, said in a memo to staff. "Instead, Catholic Charities will assume financial responsibility [for keeping] its doors open and its programs and staffs in place for the foreseeable future." The agency noted, however, that "[a] prolonged government shutdown would force a reconsideration of the initial decision to carry on the services normally provided by the agency."
According to a contingency plan posted on its Web site, the Corporation for National and Community Service is operating with enough staff to support programs not contingent on annual appropriations. The plan only covers a two-week shutdown, however, and if the impasse lasts longer, the agency "may determine that it is necessary to terminate some operations."
Even if a deal on a continuing resolution is reached soon, a more serious and potentially harmful showdown looms over the debt ceiling in mid-October. According to a survey (summary, 21 pages, PDF) released earlier this year by the Nonprofit Finance Fund, 56 percent of charities have three months of cash reserves or less. "Those are ones that most likely don't have lines of credit or 'fat-cat' donors who can give in a pinch," NCN's Thompson told the NonProfit Times. "Those are the ones most likely to furlough."
Diana Aviv, president and CEO of Independent Sector, a coalition of nonprofit and foundation leaders, addressed the issue during the organization's national conference in New York City this week. "We elect officials to govern, and when they fail in their obligations they get a failing grade from us," said Aviv. "Shutting down government hurts communities, it hurts poor people, it hurts families. It's time for them to get back to the business of governing."
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest e-mail, 10/8/13icon

Can I Charge That to the Program?
No, it isn’t OK to use your federal grant dollars to buy a brand new Rolls Royce. Sorry, but spending $350,000 for a luxury car to shuttle low-income elderly folks to and from the doctor is a bit excessive.
Well then, can you buy a used minivan for $3,500? Maybe. It all depends on your grant agreement and the applicable cost principles. Sometimes I wonder if the main role of the federal government is to create and promulgate rules! And it seems that the rules regarding federal grants have come from decades of experience with, shall we say, “creative” grantees.
When it comes to costs, I have to assume the federal government has seen it all.  I spent a few minutes Googling “federal grants and luxury cars” and found quite a few interesting stories of misbehavior. And if the misbehavior becomes a pattern, federal officials will write rules to prohibit the behavior.  It can show up in one of these four documents:
1. U.S. Code — Congress will pass legislation in the form of a Public Law or authorizing statute that creates the grant program, among other things. The authorizing statute provides federal agencies and grantees information about the public need that should be addressed and what types of programs and activities are allowable under the program.
2. Code of Federal Regulations — The C.F.R. is administrative law that interprets how U.S. Code should be executed. The C.F.R. includes two sets of rules for grantees (which derive from Office of Management and Budget circulars): administrative regulations and cost principles.
2A. Cross-cutting administrative rules — “Cross-cutting” means that the rules apply to all grants. The administrative rules are found in OMB Circular A-102 (45 C.F.R Part 92) and in OMB Circular A-110 (2 C.F.R. Part 215). Awarding agency implementation of these circulars set forth the rules on how grantees should manage a federal grant, including status reporting requirements and closing out a program.
2B. Cross-cutting cost principles — These principles inform grantees about how they are allowed to spend their federal funds and are also found in OMB circulars. These rules can get pretty technical when it comes to items such as leases and advertising.  These cost principles are contained in Circular A-21 (2 C.F.R. Part 220) for institutions of higher education; Circular A-87 (2 C.F.R. Part 225) for state, local and Indian tribal governments; Circular A-122 (2 C.F.R. Part 230) for nonprofit organizations; 48 C.F.R. Part 31.2 for for-profit organizations; and 45 C.F.R. Part 74, Appendix E for hospitals (see Tab 1100 in the Single Audit Information Service).
3. Federal Agency and Program Regulations — These regulations provide grantees more information on what rules apply to the federal agency and any particular program under that agency.  The regulations generally supplement what the C.F.R. and OMB require, which are generally global in nature. For instance, if you have won funding from the U.S. Department of Education, you will also need to follow the Education Department General Administration Regulation (EDGAR). EDGAR governs all ED programs. However, if you are running a tutoring program for homeless high school students funded by ED, there may be specific program regulations that could say grantees can spend money on books and tutors, but specifically exclude spending on housing and transportation (thus the minivan in the example above would be disallowed).  Program regulations will vary from program to program, even under the same federal agency, so grantees need to read them carefully. Another ED program may allow reimbursement of transportation costs for income-eligible program participants; however, that still falls short of purchasing a minivan.
4. Grant terms and conditions — The awarding agency can supplement any of the above guidance when it makes an award, and these additional requirements will be outlined in the award documents provided to the grantee. For instance, the terms and conditions may limit or prohibit the grantee from charging the grantor for indirect costs, even if the grantee has an approved indirect cost rate.
It would be great if the federal government would put all of these documents, except for the specific grant agreement, in once place, but currently it doesn’t. The administrative rules and the cost principles are scattered between several documents, and the ones you use depends on what type of entity received the grant, what agency awarded the grant, and what program was funded.
But stay tuned, OMB this spring issued a grants reform proposal that would combine all these circulars, including OMB Circular A-133 and A-89 into one “mega-circular” (see ¶210 in the Service).
Is The Hierarchy Upside Down?
Some folks argue that the above hierarchy is upside down, but it makes sense to me. The administrative rules and cost principles apply to all grants except when specifically supplemented by the agency and program regulations. And these rules and program regulations can be supplemented by the actual grant terms and conditions outlined in the award documents.
Therefore, the grantee and the auditor need to assess a particular cost against all of the applicable documents in the hierarchy.
Common Sense Principles
Inside an appendix of the cost principles, the federal government gives us a common sense list of how to determine if a cost is allowable. However, as my grandmother used to say, “Common sense isn’t so common,” so we sometimes end up with “creative” costs.
Appendix A of Circular A-87 (2 C.F.R. 225) states that costs should be:
* Both necessary and reasonable for proper and efficient performance and administration of the award — Have you ever met a prudent person? Well, if I have, I didn’t recognize him or her! Government regulations ask us to evaluate the rationality and reasonableness of a decision through the eyes of this fictional character. Obviously, the concept of “prudence” is vague and subject to interpretation. Yes, we need to tote the elderly to and from their appointments, but should the rides occur on a public bus or in a private car? Which choice do you think is more prudent?
* Allocable to the federal award — Obviously, direct costs such as bread for a school lunch program are allocable to a program. But what about indirect costs like maintenance of the lunchroom facilities? It isn’t fair for the school district to pay for all of the maintenance of the lunchroom without at least a little help from the grantor. But the school lunch program isn’t the only beneficiary of a clean, safe lunchroom; the kids and the school staff benefit too. But how the costs are allocated and divided among those who use the lunchroom can get messy. The fairness and accuracy of the allocation of indirect costs is a classic and perpetual accounting dilemma. Many of us accountants are even a little scared of it and relegate the task of allocating indirect costs to an accountant who specializes in cost allocations, typically a management accountant.
* Treated consistently regardless of the source of funds — Most programs receive both federal and local dollars. The programs I audited as a legislative auditor received both state and federal dollars, so the state instituted a variety of rules that mimicked federal rules so that both the federal and state governments would concur if that grantee attempted to purchase a Rolls Royce with federal dollars and a used minivan with the state dollars.
* Net of all applicable credits — It wouldn’t be fair to the federal awarding agency if a grantee took a rebate it earned from the purchase of a copier and used it on some other program. That rebate belongs to the federal government under the federal program. This also applies to purchase discounts, rebates or allowances, recoveries or indemnities on losses, insurance refunds or rebates, and adjustments of overpayments or erroneous charges.
* Determined in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) — Ah, GAAP, the accountant’s continued employment clause. Accountants are masters of GAAP, which helps make sure amounts are determined consistently and that the transaction data can be verified and is complete. In other words, once you decide how to treat a transaction, all similar transactions should be treated the same way. And, by the way, make sure the transaction really happened.
* Expended in conformance with federal and state laws — California has very strict car emissions standards. Federal money could not be used to purchase a used minivan to be used to transport the elderly in Los Angeles if the minivan does not meet the state’s emission standards.
* Conforming to all limitations contained in the law, regulations and grant terms and conditions — Didn’t we just talk about this?
* Charged only to the federal award or indirect pool to which they relate, and not be included as a cost or used to meet cost sharing or matching requirements of any other federal award — Do you remember when Al Gore “created the internet?” Well, I was a controller over that program for the state. The grant had a matching requirement asking that for every federal dollar spent, the state spend a dollar “to enhance internet commerce.” Boy, was that vague. I remember calling every state agency asking if they were doing anything on the Internet, but the Internet was so nascent that we had a hard time finding anyone experimenting with it. Luckily, the future-thinking state comptroller was working to put many of its tax forms online. We reasoned that taxes related to commerce, and then made sure those costs weren’t being charged to another grant and were being funded by general appropriations only, and voila, we had our match. Are you wondering why we didn’t figure where the matching would come from ahead of time, before we applied for the grant? Me too.
* Adequately documented — “If it ain’t documented, it didn’t happen!” has to be one of the most hackneyed expressions of auditors and accountants. But when it comes to federal funds, it is true. Every expenditure must be proven or the federal government may ask for its money back!
So can you buy a Rolls Royce? The answer is still no because of the reasonableness/prudent person rule. But can you purchase a minivan? It depends on whether the program rules or the grant terms and conditions allow it. If you are tutoring homeless students, the answer is probably no. But if you are shuttling the elderly to and from their doctor’s appointments, the answer could be yes. Just make sure you get a receipt!
From Grants Intelligence, 10/3/13icon

Texas Women’s Health Program Now Offers Brochures, Posters
The Texas Women’s Health Program has expanded the outreach materials it offers to help community groups and healthcare providers share information about the program. Along with brochures, there are now posters and general information cards.
To order materials, visit http://www.hhsc.state.tx.us/WomensHealth/brochure-request.asp.
From Texas Women’s Health Program e-mail, 10/4/13icon                                                                


Public Funding Opportunities

Public Education Efforts to Increase Solid Organ Donation: HRSA-14-013
SOURCE: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 12/3/13.
$ AVAILABLE: Four awards for an unnamed amount of funding.
ELIGIBILITY: State, city, township governments; Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments); private institutions of higher education; public and state controlled institutions of higher education; independent school districts; special district governments; county governments; nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and Native American tribal governments (federally recognized).
PURPOSE: The mission of this grant program is to educate the public about the need for solid organ donation and to encourage positive deceased donation decisions, documentation, and family discussions. 
CFDA: 93.134
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see https://grants3.hrsa.gov/2010/Web2External/Interface/FundingCycle/ExternalView.aspx?&fCycleID=5ea06359-1be9-48ef-bf9e-ed06fd86a3dc&txtAction=View+Details&submitAction=Go&ViewMode=EU
From HRSA Web site, accessed 10/10/13icon
Subject(s) medical research

Research Answers to NCI’s Provocative Questions - Group A (R01): RFA-CA-13-016
SOURCE: National Cancer Institute (NCI)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: Due 30 days before the due date. Application: 1/15/14 and 6/20/14 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.
$ AVAILABLE: The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications.
ELIGIBILITY: Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education, nonprofits with and without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education), small businesses, for-profit organizations (other than small businesses), state governments, U.S. territories or possessions, Indian/Native American tribal government (federally recognized and other than federally recognized), Indian/Native American tribally designated organizations, non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities, Hispanic-serving institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs), Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions, regional organizations, eligible agencies of the federal government, and faith-based or community-based organizations.
PURPOSE: The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support innovative research projects designed to solve specific problems and paradoxes in cancer research identified by the NCI Provocative Questions initiative.
CFDA: 93.393, 93.394, 93.395, 93.396, 93.399
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-CA-13-016.html
From NIH Web site, accessed 10/10/13icon
Subject(s) cancer research

Research Answers to NCI’s Provocative Questions - Group A (R21): RFA-CA-13-017
SOURCE: National Cancer Institute (NCI)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Letter of Intent: Due 30 days before the due date. Application: 1/15/14 and 6/20/14 by 5 pm local time of applicant organization.
$ AVAILABLE: The number of awards is contingent upon NIH appropriations and the submission of a sufficient number of meritorious applications.
ELIGIBILITY: Public/state/private controlled institutions of higher education, nonprofits with and without 501(c)(3) IRS status (other than institutions of higher education), small businesses, for-profit organizations (other than small businesses), state governments, U.S. territories or possessions, Indian/Native American tribal government (federally recognized and other than federally recognized), Indian/Native American tribally designated organizations, non-domestic (non-U.S.) entities, Hispanic-serving institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities (TCCUs), Alaska native and native Hawaiian serving institutions, regional organizations, eligible agencies of the federal government, and faith-based or community-based organizations.
PURPOSE: The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support innovative research projects designed to solve specific problems and paradoxes in cancer research identified by the NCI Provocative Questions initiative.
CFDA: 93.393, 93.394, 93.395, 93.396, 93.399
CONTACT: Please see URL for multiple contacts. For more information see http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-CA-13-017.html
From NIH Web site, accessed 10/10/13icon
Subject(s) cancer research

Rural Health Network Development (RHND) Grant Program: HRSA-14-044
SOURCE: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 11/22/13.
$ AVAILABLE: $4.5 Million for 15 awards.
ELIGIBILITY: The lead applicant organization must be a public or private non-profit entity located in a rural area. The network must be formal and composed of at least 3 separate, existing health care providers.
PURPOSE: The Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Rural Health Policy (ORHP) is accepting applications for fiscal year (FY) 2014 Rural Health Network Development Grant Program. The purpose of this grant program is to: support rural integrated health care networks that have combined the functions of the entities participating in the network in order to: achieve efficiencies; expand access to, coordinate, and improve the quality of essential health care services; and strengthen the rural health care system as a whole.
CFDA: 93.912
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see http://www.grants.gov/view-opportunity.html?oppId=243713
From HRSA Web site, accessed 10/10/13icon
Subject(s) rural health

Social and Behavioral Interventions to Increase Solid Organ Donation: HRSA-14-014
SOURCE: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 11/20/13.
$ AVAILABLE: Four awards for an unnamed amount of funding.
ELIGIBILITY: State, city, township governments; Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments); private institutions of higher education; public and state controlled institutions of higher education; independent school districts; special district governments; county governments; nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and Native American tribal governments (federally recognized).
PURPOSE: The overall goal of this grant program is to reduce the gap between the demand for organ transplants and the supply of organs from deceased donors by identifying successful strategies that can serve as model interventions to increase deceased organ donation registration or family consent.
CFDA: 93.134
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=237334
From HRSA Web site, accessed 10/10/13icon
Subject(s) medical research


Private Funding Opportunities

AUR (Association of University Radiologists) Research and Education Foundation Seeking Applications for Ethics and Professionalism Grants for Radiologists
SOURCE: AUR Research and Education Foundation
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 1/10/14.
$ AVAILABLE: Grants of up to $50,000 will be awarded in a single year. The awards may be used for salary support and/or other project costs.The AUR Research & Education Foundation does not fund institutional indirect costs, overhead costs, or tuition through the program.
ELIGIBILITY: Any member of AUR is eligible to apply as principal investigator. However, it is not necessary for all members of the research or development team to be AUR members. Eligibility of the principal investigator must be maintained throughout the grant period.
PURPOSE: The mission of the AUR Research and Education Foundation, the charitable arm of the Association of University Radiologists, is to encourage excellence in radiological laboratory and clinical investigation, teaching and clinical practice; to stimulate an interest in academic radiology as a medical career; to advance radiology as a medical science; and to represent academic radiology at a national level.
The foundation is currently accepting applications for its Ethics and Professionalism in Radiology Project grants, which are designed to improve patient care and safety and promote social responsibility in medical care and practice by providing funding opportunities for the study and teaching of ethics and professionalism in radiology.
Projects that address any aspect of ethics and professionalism in radiology will be considered. Examples of types of projects include but are not limited to research of ethical dilemmas faced by academic radiologists or radiology physicians-in-training and the methods by which the dilemmas are addressed and educational programs to teach ethics and professionalism to practicing radiologists, to radiology physicians-in-training, or to allied members of the academic radiology community.
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see http://www.aur.org/Secondary.aspx?id=798
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest web site, accessed 10/10/13icon
Subject(s) medical research, health professions training

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Invites Research Proposals for Screen to Lead Program
SOURCE: Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 12/15/13.
$ AVAILABLE: Grant amounts will be determined on a project-by-project basis.
ELIGIBILITY: Investigators at academic laboratories are eligible to apply. Investigators must demonstrate that their research environment is equipped and suitable for aspects of the work plan that would be carried out at their facility or in their lab. Collaborations between multiple investigators to strengthen the work proposed will be considered favorably but are not a requirement. Applicants need not be United States citizens nor be associated with a U.S.-based institution, but they should hold a Ph.D., M.D., D.V.M., or equivalent degree.
PURPOSE: The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society has issued a Request for Proposals through its Translational Research Program to support drug-discovery programs specifically directed toward medicinal chemistry and/or drug-target screening for hematological malignancies. LLS recognizes a significant need for investigators to receive resources for high-throughput screening and optimization of small molecules into drug-like compounds suitable for in vivo testing in a disease-relevant model that can be used for further preclinical proof-of-concept testing of a new drug target.
The goal of the RFP is the development of small molecules for in vivo proof of concept studies in disease-relevant animal models for hematological malignancies. Proposals should include strong scientific rationale for a new drug target in a hematological malignancy, provide information to assess existing intellectual property or the potential for novel chemical space, and demonstrate or explain how a screening assay can be developed to accommodate a high volume of compounds or indicate how a tractable lead compound can be further developed.
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see http://www.lls.org/#/researchershealthcareprofessionals/academicgrants/screentolead/
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest e-mail, 10/4/13icon
Subject(s) medical research, cancer research

Milstein Medical Asian American Partnership Foundation Invites Applications for Senior Health Fellowship, Translational Research Projects
SOURCE: Milstein Medical Asian American Partnership Foundation (MMAAP)
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 11/1/13.
$ AVAILABLE: Plrease see PURPOSE Section for funding information.
ELIGIBILITY: Chinese applicants should come from major medical centers with demonstrated excellence in geriatric medicine and gerontology. In addition, applicants must be under the age of 50 and hold the rank of instructor or above; possess an M.D. or Ph.D. within the specialty of geriatrics and gerontology; have significant research experience with a distinguished publication record; possess commitment to research and academics and demonstrated leadership skills; and have excellent proficiency in English.
PURPOSE: The mission of the Milstein Medical Asian American Partnership Foundation is to improve world health by developing mutually beneficial partnerships among the United States, China, and countries in greater Asia. To that end, the foundation is inviting applications from mainland China for the Irma and Paul Milstein Program for Senior Health Fellowship Award and the Translational Research Project Award.
Irma and Paul Milstein Program for Senior Health Fellowship Award: The fellowship provides support for a Chinese scholar for one year of geriatric medicine and aging research training at a prominent sponsoring institution in the U.S. The fellowship will provide support for the fellow in the amount of $60,000, in addition to a $25,000 grant to the hosting U.S. institution. Applicants must have a career goal to become a distinguished researcher focusing on the challenges of aging and geriatric conditions.
Translational Research Project Award: The award provides support for one translational research project in the areas of geriatrics, dermatology, and hematology with the potential for immediate impact on improving senior health in China. The award will provide $50,000 in support for the project to be conducted at the applicant's home institution in China and $10,000 in support for the U.S. partner institution.
For this first round of MMAAP Foundation awards, Johns Hopkins University will serve as both the hosting institution for the fellow and the partner institution for the translational research project.
CONTACT: Milstein Medical Asian American Partnership Foundation, (212) 850-4505. For more information see http://www.mmaapf.org/en/grants/
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest e-mail, 10/4/13icon
Subject(s) aged/seniors, medical research, health professions training

Prostate Cancer Foundation Invites Applications for 2014 Young Investigators Awards
SOURCE: Prostate Cancer Foundation
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 11/13/13.
$ AVAILABLE: The awards will provide $75,000 per year for three years to advance the career and research efforts of the awardees. Funds may be used flexibly to advance the career and research efforts of the awardee. This includes, for example, funding "protected time" or direct costs for experiments. Documentation will be requested of any in-kind level of support, including dedicated space, equipment, institutional overhead, and core institutional resources. Mentorship is required for every PCF Young Investigator applicant and grantee. Awardees and their mentors will be required to attend the annual PCF Scientific Retreat in October 2014.
ELIGIBILITY: Applications are welcome from the global community. Applicants need not be trained specifically in clinical prostate cancer research. Young Investigators may be working in basic, translational, or clinical research, or in population sciences, bioengineering, or any other field that could contribute to the end of prostate cancer. However, successful applicants should be working in a research environment capable of supporting transformational prostate cancer research. Access to and interaction with a clinical environment, as well as translational prostate cancer physician-scientists, is highly desirable. Applicants should be within six years of completing a professional degree or clinical training such as an M.D., Ph.D., M.D.-Ph.D., M.P.H., or equivalent. The applicant may hold the title of senior postdoctoral fellow, instructor, research associate, assistant professor, or equivalent.
PURPOSE: The Prostate Cancer Foundation has announced another round of funding for early career prostate cancer researchers through its Young Investigators Awards program.
Consistent with the foundation's goal to end death and suffering from prostate cancer, the awards program seeks to help develop a gifted cohort of investigators to undertake the next generation of prostate cancer research. Investigators with diverse expertise from anywhere in the world are invited to apply.
Highly innovative basic science programs will be considered, but priority will be given to "bench to bedside" translational research proposals with the potential to deliver near-term benefit to patients.
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see http://www.pcf.org/site/c.leJRIROrEpH/b.5849007/k.F70A/Open_RFAs.htm
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest e-mail, 10/4/13icon
Subject(s) cancer research, medical research, health professions training

Prostate Cancer Foundation Invites Applications for Movember – PCF Challenge Award 2013
SOURCE: Prostate Cancer Foundation
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 11/6/13.
$ AVAILABLE: This Award will support one large-scale research project concerning metastatic prostate cancer over a duration of two years, providing up to a total of $1 million for one team. The Award will cover direct research costs only.
ELIGIBILITY: Proposals must be from teams of at least 3 highly experienced investigators capable of providing unique scientific expertise to the solution of a significant problem in prostate cancer research. The team may be assembled from one institution or several institutions from across the globe, and must embed a young investigator as an integral contributor to the team.
PURPOSE: Proposals must be from teams of at least 3 highly experienced investigators capable of providing unique scientific expertise to the solution of a significant problem in prostate cancer research. The team may be assembled from one institution or several institutions from across the globe, and must embed a young investigator as an integral contributor to the team.
The 2013 Movember-PCF Challenge Award will focus on funding translational and clinical science to advance immunotherapy. Areas of particular interest to PCF include but are not limited to: (1) adoptive engineered T cell therapy; (2) Checkpoint inhibition therapy; (3) Development of rational combination/sensitization immunotherapy regimens; (4) Characterization of biomarker(s) that predict response or innate resistance to immunotherapy; (5) Other novel first-in-field immunotherapy strategies with near term translational potential.
CONTACT: Please see URL for contact information. For more information see http://www.pcf.org/site/c.leJRIROrEpH/b.5849007/k.F70A/Open_RFAs.htm
From The Foundation Center's Philanthropy News Digest e-mail, 10/4/13icon
Subject(s) cancer research, medical research, health professions training


Events

Creating Sustainable Funding For Your Nonprofit
SPONSOR: Center for Community Based & Nonprofit Organizations at Austin Community College (CCBNO ACC)
WHEN: October 22, 3 to 4:30 pm.
WHERE: C Bank Community Suite – First Equity Building, 2nd Floor, 8998 Research Boulevard, (Austin, TX).
DESCRIPTION: Benevon CEO and founder Terry Axelrod will give you an overview of the Benevon Model — a systematic process for engaging and developing relationships with mission-focused individual donors. You will learn how to make your organization more visible in your community and how to identify and cultivate individual donors who are passionate about your mission.
COST: Free.
CONTACT: Ann-Li Cooke, (206) 428-2142.
From Center for Community Based & Nonprofit Organizations at Austin Community College e-mail, 10/8/13icon

The Board Self-Assessment Process
SPONSOR: Center for Community Based & Nonprofit Organizations at Austin Community College (CCBNO ACC)
WHEN: October 29, 11:30 am to 1:30 pm.
WHERE: ACC Highland Business Center, 5930 Middle Fiskville Road, Highland Mall, (Austin, TX).
DESCRIPTION: Boards are ultimately responsible for their organization, yet they spend little time examining their performance. Fundraising, budgets, and policies take meeting time away from the bigger picture. A board self-assessment puts governance in perspective by allowing the board to review its responsibilities and ask, “How can we improve so that we better help the organization?” This workshop will define criteria for an effective board, outline the benefits of a board self-assessment, describe the self-assessment process, and identify steps that need to be taken after the self-assessment process.
COST: $30.
CONTACT: Lisa Dent, (512) 223-7051.
From Center for Community Based & Nonprofit Organizations at Austin Community College e-mail, 10/8/13icon

Board Members’ Fiduciary Responsibility
SPONSOR: Center for Community Based & Nonprofit Organizations at Austin Community College (CCBNO ACC)
WHEN: November 6, 9 am to noon.
WHERE: ACC Highland Business Center, 5930 Middle Fiskville Road, Highland Mall, (Austin, TX).
DESCRIPTION: Organizational credibility is a critical element in fulfilling an organization’s mission. The Board, and each of its members, has a key role in sustaining that credibility. Any decline impacts the specific organization and the larger nonprofit sector and promotes questioning of the entire sector’s legitimacy. This is especially dangerous and counterproductive during the current economic times.
At the same time, increased public awareness and scrutiny of how nonprofits operate, fueled by the exceptional scandals that grab public headlines, require all engaged in the nonprofit enterprise to be aware of, implement, and maintain principles and systems of good governance.
This learning opportunity, facilitated by Barry Silverberg – who has over 38 years of experience in the nonprofit sector as a professional and volunteer leader – will focus on what is and who determines what constitutes good governance; the difference between governance and management; the fundamental legal duties, responsibilities, authority and expectations of nonprofit boards and their members; Sarbanes-Oxley requirements and implications; the importance and use of policies and committees; and if time allows, the 12 Principles of Governance.
COST: $25 TANO members / $30 non-members.
CONTACT: Kate Tolliver, (512) 223-7051.
From Center for Community Based & Nonprofit Organizations at Austin Community College e-mail, 10/8/13icon

Board Members’ Fiduciary Responsibility
SPONSOR: Center for Community Based & Nonprofit Organizations at Austin Community College (CCBNO ACC)
WHEN: November 6, 9 am to noon.
WHERE: Your home or office. We will be live streaming this class via Webex to allow participants from all around the state to participate. All you need to do is register and choose the “Live Stream” option and you’ll be set. We will send you more information as we get closer to the class date.
DESCRIPTION: Organizational credibility is a critical element in fulfilling an organization’s mission. The Board, and each of its members, has a key role in sustaining that credibility. Any decline impacts the specific organization and the larger nonprofit sector and promotes questioning of the entire sector’s legitimacy. This is especially dangerous and counterproductive during the current economic times.
At the same time, increased public awareness and scrutiny of how nonprofits operate, fueled by the exceptional scandals that grab public headlines, require all engaged in the nonprofit enterprise to be aware of, implement, and maintain principles and systems of good governance.
This learning opportunity, facilitated by Barry Silverberg – who has over 38 years of experience in the nonprofit sector as a professional and volunteer leader – will focus on what is and who determines what constitutes good governance; the difference between governance and management; the fundamental legal duties, responsibilities, authority and expectations of nonprofit boards and their members; Sarbanes-Oxley requirements and implications; the importance and use of policies and committees; and if time allows, the 12 Principles of Governance.
COST: $25 TANO members / $30 non-members.
CONTACT: Kate Tolliver, (512) 223-7051.
From Center for Community Based & Nonprofit Organizations at Austin Community College e-mail, 10/8/13icon


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Last updated October 15, 2013