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    DSHS HIV/STD Program

    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, Texas 78714

    Phone: (512) 533-3000

    E-mail the HIV/STD Program

    E-mail data requests to HIV/STD Program

    DSHS strives to respond to all email requests in a timely manner. It is important to note, however, that messages that you send to us by email may not be secure and may be intercepted by a third party. Therefore, we recommend that you do not send any confidential health information to us by email.

Persons Living With HIV-AIDS in Texas

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Since 2004, the number of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in Texas has increased steadily, by about 5 percent each year. The number of PLWH in 2010 was about 36 percent higher than in 2004 (Figure A). The number of new HIV cases diagnosed each year increases the total number of people living with the disease, but this is partially offset by deaths among those infected. In Texas, the number of new HIV diagnoses and deaths among PLWH has remained largely stable in the past seven years, averaging around 4,180 new diagnoses and 1,470 deaths per year (Figure B). The increase in PLWH over time reflects continued survival due to better treatment, not an increase in new diagnoses. In an environment of increasing numbers of PLWH, the fact that new diagnoses have remained level speaks to successful prevention efforts, but more must be done in order to actually reduce the number of new HIV diagnoses.

Figures A and B

Persons Living With HIV/AIDS in Texas

Figure A

 

New HIV Diagnoses and Deaths Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS in Texas

Figure B

In the seven year period from 2004-2010, numbers and rates of PLWH increased for both sexes, all races/ethnicities and all adult/adolescent age groups (Table 1). The distribution of cases between sexes remained the same from 2004 to 2010, with over three quarters of living cases among males. Although Black Texans only represented 11 percent of the general population in 2004, they constituted the largest proportion of PLWH in that year and their share of living cases has steadily increased. The rate of Black PLWH in 2010 (852.4/100,000) was over four times the rate of either White (191.2/100,000) or Hispanic PLWH (175.4/100,000), and is a significant health disparity in our state.

Table 1. Persons Living With HIV by Select Characteristics, Texas, 2004 and 2010

 

2004

2010

Number

Percent

Rate

Number

Percent

Rate

State Total

47,986

100%

213.4

65,077

100%

256.5

Status            

HIV

 20,529

 43%

 91.3

 29,085

 45%

114.6

AIDS

 27,457

 57%

 122.1

 35,992 

 55%

141.8

Sex            

Male

37,394

78%

333.2

50,686

78%

397.7

Female

10,592

22%

94.0

14,391

22%

113.9

Race/Ethnicity            

White

17,820

37%

158.8

21,876

34%

191.2

Black

17,993

37%

700.7

24,938

38%

852.4

Hispanic

11,530

24%

146.9

17,274

27%

175.4

Other

394

1%

46.3

682

1%

58.9

Multi Racial/Unknown

249

1%

 

307

0%

 
Age Group            

Under 2

18

0%

2.4

11

0%

1.4

2 - 12

346

1%

9.4

210

0%

5.2

13 - 24

2,046

4%

49.1

3,223

5%

73.6

25 - 34

9,943

21%

295.4

11,656

18%

299.2

35 - 44

19,599

41%

582.3

19,145

29%

515.8

45 - 54

12,045

25%

403.9

21,204

33%

610.1

55+

3,989

8%

95.7

9,628

15%

190.1

Risk Category *            

MSM

24,871

52%

 

35,816

55%

 

IDU

7,942

17%

 

8,820

14%

 

MSM/IDU

3,962

8%

 

4,159

6%

 

Heterosexual

10,498

22%

 

15,495

24%

 

Pediatric

561

1%

 

643

1%

 

Adult Other

152

0%

 

144

0%

 
*Rates are not calculated because there are no good estimates of population sizes for behavioral risk groups.

PLWH by Age Group

From 2004 to 2010, the distribution of PLWH across age groups continued to shift to those over the age of 45 (Figure C). These data reflect the aging of the infected population, not an increase of new diagnoses among older adults. This shift was at least partially due to the continued effect of improved treatment therapies and survival. The number of children living with HIV under the age of 13 has decreased by 25 percent in the past five years most likely as a result of effective prenatal and perinatal testing and treatments that significantly reduced the risk of transmission from HIV-infected mothers to their newborns.

Figure C

Percent of Total Persons Living With HIV

Figure C

PLWH by Race/Ethnicity

Figure D shows the number of PLWH by race/ethnicity on the left and the rate of PLWH on the right. While the number of living cases increased among all racial/ethnic groups between 2004 and 2010, the percentage increase over the period was sharper among Hispanics (50%) and Blacks (39%) when compared with Whites (23%). Note that while the disparities between different races/ethnicities in terms of case numbers living with HIV are not overwhelming, the same cannot be said of the case rates.  The rate of Black PLWH was consistently more than four times higher than rates for White and Hispanic PLWH over the 7 year time period. This illustrates the tremendous burden of disease among Blacks when compared to Whites and Hispanics.

Figures D1 and D2

Cases of Persons Living With HIV by Race/Ethnicity

Figure D1

 

Rate of Persons Living With HIV by Race/Ethnicity

Figure D2

Data

This is a summary of information on known HIV cases in Texas diagnosed through December 31, 2010 and reported as of June 30, 2011. Data are collected during routine disease surveillance and reported in the Electronic HIV/AIDS Reporting System (eHARS). This system does not include those unaware of their HIV infection or those who tested HIV positive solely through an anonymous HIV test.

The data for HIV were analyzed by the year of diagnosis, not the year of report to the health department. The data presented on persons living with HIV represent the cumulative number of people living with HIV in Texas who are not known to be deceased. The section focused on new HIV diagnoses includes all new cases of HIV disease regardless of their disease status (HIV-only or AIDS) at diagnosis.

It is important to consider not only the total number of cases, but also the number of cases relative to the size of the population in question. Therefore, when possible, we have included case rates to illustrate this point. A case rate is the number of people with HIV per 100,000 members of that particular population. Comparing case rates shows the relative difference of the burden of disease across groups with different population sizes.


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Last updated March 27, 2012