• DSHS HIV/STD Program

    Post Office Box 149347, MC 1873
    Austin, Texas 78714

    Phone: 737-255-4300

    Email the HIV/STD Program

    Email data requests to HIV/STD Program - This email can be used to request data and statistics on HIV, TB, and STDs in Texas. It cannot be used to get treatment or infection history for individuals, or to request information on programs and services. Please do not include any personal, identifying health information in your email such as HIV status, Date of Birth, Social Security Number, etc.

    For treatment/testing history, please contact your local Health Department.

    For information on HIV testing and services available to Persons Living with HIV and AIDS, please contact your local HIV services organization.

Border Report Section 4 - HIV Diagnoses and People Living with HIV


In 2017, the Texas-Mexico border region had a lower rate of new HIV diagnoses and people living with HIV (PLWH) compared to the rest of Texas. Counties in the Texas-Mexico border region with rates of new HIV diagnoses or PLWH greater than the average for the Texas-Mexico border region are shown in Table 4. The relatively higher rate of PLWH and new HIV diagnoses in Willacy county may be explained by the presence of large (≥3,000 capacity) private correctional facilities located in this county.

Table 4: New HIV Diagnoses and PLWH among Adults/adolescents, 2017, by EMA/TGA and Select Counties from the Texas-Mexico Border Region

New HIV
Diagnoses

People Living
with HIV

Number

Rate*

Number

Rate*

Texas

4,391

15.5

90,700

320.4

Austin TGA

288

13.6

6,217

293.8

Dallas EMA

999

20.0

22,079

442.3

Fort Worth TGA

301

12.5

6,086

252.2

Houston EMA

1,234

20.0

28,225

457.8

San Antonio TGA

382

16.5

6,674

289.1

East Texas TGA

310

11.3

5,864

213.6

All Other Texas 

402

8.4

6,399

133.9

Texas-Mexico Border

321

11.5

5,120

184.0

Border counties with New HIV diagnosis rates above the Texas-Mexico Border average†

El Paso

124

14.8

2,179

259.3

Hudspeth

1

22.7^

3

68.1^

Presidio

1

14.0^

8

111.8

Willacy

3

13.9^

37

171.4

Zapata

2

14.0^

13

90.8

* Rates are per 100,000 persons
† Counties not shown had rates of new diagnoses and PLWH at or below the average for the Texas-Mexico border region as a whole.
^ Rates calculated with numerators of 5 or less are statistically unstable and should be interpreted with caution.  
Source: Texas eHARS as of July 13, 2018


The epidemiology of new HIV diagnoses in the Texas-Mexico border region is like that of the state overall. A higher percentage of new diagnoses are attributable to men who have sex with men (MSM) transmission (Tables 5a and 5b).

The Texas-Mexico border region has proportionally fewer PLWH compared to other areas of the state. A much higher percentage of PLWH and new HIV diagnoses in the Texas-Mexico border region identify as Hispanic and a lower percentage are female.

Table 5a: Count and Rate of New HIV Diagnoses in the Texas-Mexico Border Region and Texas by Birth Sex, Gender Identity, Race, Age Group, and Mode of Exposure, 2017
New HIV Diagnoses

Texas-Mexico Border Region

Texas

Count

Percent1

Rate*

Count

Percent1

Rate*

Total

321

100%

11.5

4,391

100%

15.5

Birth Sex







Female

38

12%

2.7

753

17%

5.3

Male

283

88%

20.6

3,578

81%

25.4

Gender Identity







Transgender Women

0

-

-

59

1%

-

Transgender Men

0

-

-

1

<1%

-

Race







White

17

5%

6.8

845

19%

7.1

Black

9

3%

25.3

1,621

37%

48.1

Hispanic

293

91%

12.0

1,758

40%

15.8

Other

2

<1%

6.4

70

2%

4.7

Multi-race

0

-

-

97

2%

23.6

Age Group







0-14

0

-

-

9

<1%

0.1

15-24

63

20%

14.0

980

22%

24.5

25-34

117

36%

30.7

1,640

37%

39.4

35-44

63

20%

18.1

849

19%

22.3

45-54

53

17%

17.0

576

13%

16.2

55-64

16

5%

6.1

280

6%

8.8

65+

9

3%

2.7

57

1%

1.6

Mode of Exposure







MSM†

249

78%

*

3,126

71%

*

MSM/PWID

14

4%

*

135

3%

*

PWID†

15

5%

*

228

5%

*

Heterosexual^

44

14%

*

892

20%

*

Perinatal

0

-

*

9

<1%

*

Adult Other

0

-

*

0

0%

*

1 Totals are estimated via a CDC-algorithm that determines primary mode of exposure using decimal points. These totals may not add up as rounding to the ones decimal place was implemented.
* Rates are per 100,000 people. Rates calculated with numerators of 5 of less are statistically unstable; interpret with caution
† Persons Who Inject Drugs (PWID), Men who have Sex with Men (MSM)
^ Heterosexual means women who have sex with men and men who have sex with women  
Source: Texas eHARS as of July 13, 2018

Table 5b: Count and Rate of People Living with HIV in the Texas-Mexico Border Region and Texas by Birth Sex, Gender Identity, Race, Age Group, and Mode of Exposure, 2017
People Living with HIV

Texas-Mexico Border Region

Texas

Count

Percent1

Rate*

Count

Percent1

Rate*

Total

5,120

100%

184.0

90,700

100%

320.4

Birth Sex







Female

831

16%

59.0

19,168

21%

136.3

Male

4,268

83%

310.7

70,832

78%

497.3

Current Gender Identity







Transgender Women

21

<1%

-

683

<1%

-

Transgender Men

0

-

-

17

<1%

-

Race







White

344

7%

137.2

23,200

26%

195.2

Black

144

3%

404.5

33,880

37%

1,005.8

Hispanic

4,585

90%

186.8

29,469

32%

264.1

Other

15

<1%

48.1

1,060

1%

71.5

Multi-race

32

<1%

295.5

3,091

3%

752.2

Age Group







0-14

11

<1%

1.6

229

<1%

3.7

15-24

206

4%

46.0

3,872

4%

96.9

25-34

978

19%

256.4

17,986

20%

432.1

35-44

1,149

22%

330.3

20,751

23%

545.4

45-54

1,440

28%

463.2

25,412

28%

716.6

55-64

971

19%

372.0

17,187

19%

539.6

65+

365

7%

110.7

5,263

6%

151.5

Mode of Exposure







MSM†

3,346

65%

*

55,188

61%

*

MSM/PWID

203

4%

*

4,556

5%

*

PWID†

372

7%

*

8,724

10%

*

Heterosexual^

1,149

22%

*

21,237

23%

*

Perinatal

35

1%

*

856

1%

*

Adult Other

15

<1%

*

144

<1%

*

1 Totals are estimated via a CDC-algorithm that determines primary mode of exposure using decimal points. These totals may not add up as rounding to the ones decimal place was implemented.
* Rates are per 100,000 people. Rates calculated with numerators of 5 of less are statistically unstable; interpret with caution
† Persons Who Inject Drugs (PWID), Men who have Sex with Men (MSM)
^ Heterosexual means women who have sex with men and men who have sex with women  
Source: Texas eHARS as of July 13, 2018


A slightly higher percentage of persons diagnosed with HIV in the Texas-Mexico border region received an AIDS diagnosis within three months of their HIV diagnosis. This indicates that their HIV infection was diagnosed late. Potential causes of late diagnosis include decreased access to testing facilities and to general medical care, which may be associated with poverty and lack of health insurance. Receiving a late diagnosis limits the opportunity for early effective treatment and the positive health outcomes that result from early treatment. Encouragingly, there was an 11 percent decrease in late diagnoses along the Texas-Mexico border between 2014 and 2017, which might be a result of increased testing facilities and improved general medical care.

A higher percentage of persons in the Texas-Mexico border Region who were diagnosed with HIV between 2000 and 2017 have survived compared to all Texans diagnosed with HIV in this period. This difference was not as great for persons diagnosed between 1980 and 1999.

Table 6: Late Diagnoses, Death Rates due to HIV and Average Survival in Months

Texas-Mexico
Border Region

Texas

Late Diagnoses (AIDS diagnosis ≤ 3 months after HIV diagnosis) as a percent of HIV diagnoses in 2016 

28%

27%

Death Rate (per 100,000 PLWH) due to HIV (2015)

1.7

2.6

Percent of HIV Cases Surviving as of December 31, 2017, by year of diagnosis



1980-1989

1%

2%

1990-1999

16%

16%

2000-2009

36%

34%

2010-2017

38%

35%

Source: Texas eHARS as of July 13, 2018 


Gardner’s HIV Treatment Cascade is a graphic tool used to demonstrate whether people living with HIV are receiving recommended clinical care and achieving outcomes that will keep them healthy. Achieving viral suppression is vital for prolonging and improving the quality of life among PLWH and reducing the risk of transmission to their partners. PLWH in the Texas-Mexico border region have slightly lower indicators of met need and retention in care when compared to the state as a whole. However, it is noteworthy that a slightly higher percentage of PLWH in the Texas-Mexico border region achieved viral suppression.

Figure 5. Gardner’s HIV Treatment Cascade for Texas and the Texas-Mexico Border Region, 2017
Figure 5. Gardner’s HIV Treatment Cascade for Texas and the Texas-Mexico Border Region, 2017
Source: Texas eHARS as of July 13, 2018 
* DSHS HIV Unmet Need Project, 2017 (incl. eHARS, ELR, ARIES, ADAP, Medicaid, private payer data).
** Electronic Lab Records, ARIES labs, ADAP labs, 2017
Data for Figure 5


 


Border Report

Table of Contents | Executive Summary | HIV, STDs, and TB in the Texas-Mexico Border Region | Population and Demographics of the Texas-Mexico Border Region | HIV Diagnoses and People Living with HIV | Sexually Transmitted Diseases | Tuberculosis


Last updated June 17, 2020