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    TxEVER: Texas Electronic Vital Events Registrar

Paternity FAQs

Does a court order terminating the parental rights allow information to be removed from a birth certificate?

Information can be removed only if the court order has stated that the father listed on the birth certificate is not the biological father or if it specifically states that a person's name and information are to be removed from the birth record.

What is a "gestational agreement"?

A gestational agreement is an agreement under which a woman agrees to bear the child of a married couple. The child being carried by its "gestational mother" does not share any of her genetic material. The baby's genetic parents are usually referred to as the "intended parents."

Will my certified copy of a court order establishing paternity/parentage be returned to me by the state?

No. Evidence used to establish parentage is not returned; it is retained as part of the official, permanent record.

What if one of the parents is deceased?

If one of the parents is deceased, a court order indicating true and correct parentage is needed to add a parent's name and information to the birth certificate.

What is the fee for filing a new birth certificate based on parentage?

For more information, see the New Birth Certificated Base on Parentage page.

There is no father listed on my child's birth certificate because I wasn't married to anyone when my child was born. Can I file a paternity claim to have my current husband listed as the father? He is willing to accept responsibility for my child.

No, only the biological father of the child can be added to a birth certificate by using the paternity rules and procedures. The only legal way a stepfather can have his name added to the birth certificate as the father is for him to legally adopt the child. You must consult an attorney to learn about the procedures for adoption.

Where can I get a copy of the court order that I need to send in with my application?

You can obtain a certified copy of an existing court order from the district clerk's office in the county where the court action took place.

How do I get a court order allowing a change on a birth certificate to remove the father's name, add the father's name, or change the name of the father?

Our office cannot provide you with legal advice. You must contact an attorney for information on the steps and procedures for petitioning a court to establish or remove paternity.

I need an Acknowledgement of Paternity form sent to me. Where can I get that form?

Texas Vital Statistics cannot send out Acknowledgement of Paternity forms to applicants. Instead, the forms can only be obtained from someone certified by the Texas Attorney General's office to verbally explain to all the parties the rights and responsibilities that come with signing the form.

To learn about your options, find a certified person, or you do not live in Texas call the Paternity Opportunity Program at 1-866-255-2006. to find such a person or "entity." Please listen to all options carefully.

For more information, visit the Texas Attorney General Office website.

I was told that I need an "entity code." How do I get one?

Only someone who has been certified to verbally explain the parental rights and responsibilities that come with signing an Acknowledgement of Paternity form can provide you with an entity code.

To learn about your options, find a certified person, or you do not live in Texas call the Paternity Opportunity Program at 1-866-255-2006. to find such a person or "entity." Please listen to all options carefully.

For more information, visit the Texas Attorney's General Office website.

I need a copy of the Acknowledgement of Paternity form on file for my child. How can I get one?

Vital Statistics may release information relating to the Acknowledgement of Paternity or Denial of Paternity to an individual who signed the document, the courts, and the Title IV-D agency of this or another state. This includes parents, presumed fathers, court-ordered attorneys and the office of attorney general.

To request a copy, complete an Acknowledgement of Paternity Inquiry application.

Who do I contact for questions regarding completing an Acknowledgement of Paternity (AOP) form to establish paternity for my child?

Parents can call the Office of Attorney General Acknowledgement of Paternity (AOP) hotline at 866-255-2006.

For more information, visit the Texas Attorney's General Office website.

I need to find out if a man has filed a paternity claim (Intent to Claim Paternity) for a child. How would I find that information?

Qualified individuals can request a search of the paternity registry.

To learn more, see Paternity Registry Inquiries.

Who is a qualified applicant that can request a Paternity Registry inquiry?

Information contained in the registry is confidential and may be released on request only to qualified individuals.

To learn more, see Paternity Registry Inquiries.

What is the time frame that a Notice of Intent to Claim Paternity needs to be submitted?

The Notice of Intent to Claim Paternity must be filed before the birth of the child or not later than the 31st day after the date of birth of the child.

To learn more, see the Paternity Registry page.

What is the timeframe for completing an Inquiry on Court of Continuing Jurisdiction for a Child form?

For a timeframe and more information, see Court of Continuing Jurisdiction.

Where can I find the form that I should complete for the Court of Continuing Jurisdiction (CCJ) Registry?

See Court of Continuing Jurisdiction for the form and supporting information.

Can I email the Court of Continuing Jurisdiction (CCJ) form in for processing?

See Court of Continuing Jurisdiction for the form and supporting information.

Last updated September 8, 2020