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    Grand Rounds contact:
    grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


    Continuing Education contact:
    ce.service@dshs.state.tx.us


    TRAIN Texas contact:
    txtrain@dshs.state.tx.us

Presentations

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Fall 2015 Schedule

Fall 2015 Semester

The Fall 2015 semester of Grand Rounds begins on September 2 and ends on September 30, 2015. All presentations are free and are on Wednesdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Central Time in Austin (K-100 Lecture Hall at 1100 W. 49th Street, see map) or via webinar.

Please note: CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.

Past Presentations

Questions? E-mail grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


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Sept. 2, 2015, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar


Sasha Rasco
Sasha Rasco, Director of Prevention and Early Intervention, DFPS

Katheryn Sibley
Kathryn Sibley, Office of Child Safety, DFPS

Mandell - Dorothy
Dorothy Mandell, PhD, Office of Program Decision Support, DSHS

Julie Stagg
Julie Stagg, MSN, RN, State Women's and Perinatal Health Nurse Consultant

Sept.2-2015

Register for Webinar or Lecture Hall in Austin for CE Credit or Certificate of Attendance
Register for Webinar Only for No CE Credit or Certificate of Attendance

If attending in the Lecture Hall (K-100) in Austin by the Lobby (see map) for no continuing education credit or a certificate of attendance, no pre-registration is required. Simply sign in when you arrive.

Data Matching to Realign Resources: Strategic Planning to Reduce Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities

TRAIN Course ID: 1058884
Presenters: Dorothy Mandell, PhD, Office of Program Decision Support, DSHS; Sasha Rasco, Director of Prevention and Early Intervention, DFPS; Julie Stagg, MSN, RN, State Women's and Perinatal Health Nurse Consultant; and Kathryn Sibley, Office of Child Safety, DFPS
Description: A child fatality is the most tragic consequence of abuse and neglect. In April 2014, DFPS Commissioner Judge John Specia and former DSHS Commissioner Dr. David Lakey brought together their respective agencies to proactively address child fatalities and to build a more robust safety net to protect the most vulnerable in society. Data from the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) and the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) were combined to conduct a comprehensive analysis that outlined the scope of child abuse and neglect fatalities, communities in need, and risk factors that could inform directed interventions. From this analysis, DFPS and DSHS developed a plan to leverage resources, programs, and community collaborations to target specific issues and needs revealed in the analyses. Understanding the risks faced by this population, guided and directed intervention programs are being developed and coordinated between agencies to better protect vulnerable children. Please join Dorothy Mandell, PhD, Office of Program Decision Support, DSHS; Sasha Rasco, Director of Prevention and Early Intervention, DFPS; Julie Stagg, MSN, RN, State Women's and Perinatal Health Nurse Consultant; and Kathryn Sibley, Office of Child Safety, DFPS for a discussion addressing child fatalities from a public health perspective.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™; 1.5 continuing education credits for Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers (SW); Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC); Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFT); Registered Sanitarians (RS), and Certificate of Attendance
Presentation documents: coming soon
Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Brownell MD, Jutte DP. Administrative data linkage as a tool for child maltreatment research. Child Abuse Negl. 2013 Feb-Mar;37(2-3):120-4. doi: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2012.09.013. Epub 2012 Dec 20.
  2. Chahine Z, Pecora P, Sanders D. Preventing severe maltreatment-related injuries and fatalities: applying a public health framework and innovative approaches to child protection. Child Welfare. 2013;92(2):13-8.
  3. Chahine Z, Sanders D. The road ahead: comprehensive and innovative approaches for improving safety and preventing child maltreatment fatalities. Child Welfare. 2013;92(2):237-53.
  4. Covington T. The public health approach for understanding and preventing child maltreatment: a brief review of the literature and a call to action. Child Welfare. 2013;92(2):21-39.
  5. Fallon B, Trocmé N, Fluke J, MacLaurin B, Tonmyr L, Yuan YY. Methodological challenges in measuring child maltreatment. Child Abuse Negl. 2010 Jan;34(1):70-9. doi: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2009.08.008. Epub 2010 Jan 6.
  6. McKenzie K, Scott DA. Using routinely collected hospital data for child maltreatment surveillance: issues, methods and patterns. BMC Public Health. 2011 Jan 5;11:7. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-
  7. Pecora PJ, Chahine Z, Graham JC. Safety and risk assessment frameworks: overview and implications for child maltreatment fatalities. Child Welfare. 2013;92(2):143-60.
  8. Putnam-Hornstein E, Wood JN, Fluke J, Yoshioka-Maxwell A, Berger RP. Preventing severe and fatal child maltreatment: making the case for the expanded use and integration of data. Child Welfare. 2013;92(2):59-75.
  9. Richmond-Crum M, Joyner C, Fogerty S, Ellis ML, Saul J. Applying a public health approach: the role of state health departments in preventing maltreatment and fatalities of children. Child Welfare. 2013;92(2):99-117.
  10. Schnitzer PG, Gulino SP, Yuan YY. Advancing public health surveillance to estimate child maltreatment fatalities: review and recommendations. Child Welfare. 2013;92(2):77-98.
  11. Smith LR, Gibbs D, Wetterhall S, Schnitzer PG, Farris T, Crosby AE, Leeb RT. Public health efforts to build a surveillance system for child maltreatment mortality: lessons learned for stakeholder engagement. J Public Health Manag Pract. 2011 Nov-Dec;17(6):542-9. doi: 10.1097/PHH.0b013e3182126b6b.

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Sept. 9, 2015, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar
Lewis E Foxhall
Lewis E.  Foxhall, MD; Vice President for Health Policy and Professor in the Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, MD Anderson Cancer Center; DSHS Council Chair

Sept. 9 - 2015

Register for Webinar or Lecture Hall in Austin for CE Credit or Certificate of Attendance
Register for Webinar Only for No CE Credit or Certificate of Attendance

If attending in the Lecture Hall (K-100) in Austin by the Lobby (see map) for no continuing education credit or a certificate of attendance, no pre-registration is required. Simply sign in when you arrive.

Cancer Survivorship Management

TRAIN Course ID: 
1058885
Presenter: Lewis E.  Foxhall, MD; Vice President for Health Policy and Professor in the Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, MD Anderson Cancer Center; DSHS Council Chair
Description:  Cancer survivors, in addition to the risk of recurrence of cancer are also at elevated risk for second cancers, long term health problems related to their cancer or its treatment, and limitations in psychosocial function.  Numerous publications have documented the need for quality improvement in the coordination and delivery of care for cancer survivors.
 Please join Dr. Lewis E. Foxhall, MD Anderson Cancer Center for a thought provoking review of clinical interventions aimed at improving survivorship management leading to improved outcomes and quality of life.  This presentation will include strategies to more fully engage patients, assure adequately staffed, trained, and coordinated workforce, use of evidence based care, develop a learning health care systems using IT, translation of evidence into clinical practice, quality measurement and performance improvement leading to more accessible, affordable cancer care. See full abstract (pdf).
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™; 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC); Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFT); Registered Sanitarians, and Certificate of Attendance
Presentation documents: coming soon
Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Aaronson NK, Mattioli V, Minton O, et al. Beyond treatment - Psychosocial and behavioural issues in cancer survivorship research and practice. EJC Suppl. 2014 Jun;12(1):54-64. doi: 10.1016/j.ejcsup.2014.03.005. Epub 2014 May 29.
  2. Alfano CM, Smith T, de Moor JS, et al. An action plan for translating cancer survivorship research into care. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Sep 22;106(11). pii: dju287. doi: 10.1093/jnci/dju287. Print 2014 Nov.
  3. Chubak J, Tuzzio L, Hsu C, et al. Providing care for cancer survivors in integrated health care delivery systems: practices, challenges, and research opportunities. J Oncol Pract. 2012 May;8(3):184-9. doi: 10.1200/JOP.2011.000312. Epub 2012 Jan 24.
  4. Grant M, Economou D, Ferrell B, Uman G. Facilitating survivorship program development for health care providers and administrators. J Cancer Surviv. 2015 Jun;9(2):180-7. doi: 10.1007/s11764-014-0397-8. Epub 2014 Sep 13.
  5. Halpern MT, Viswanathan M, Evans TS, Birken SA, Basch E, Mayer DK. Models of Cancer Survivorship Care: Overview and Summary of Current Evidence. J Oncol Pract. 2014 Sep 9. pii: JOP.2014.001403.
  6. Irwin M, Klemp JR, Glennon C, Frazier LM. Oncology nurses' perspectives on the state of cancer survivorship care: current practice and barriers to implementation. Oncol Nurs Forum. 2011 Jan;38(1):E11-9. doi: 10.1188/11.ONF.E11-E19.
  7. Keesing S, McNamara B, Rosenwax L. Cancer survivors' experiences of using survivorship care plans: a systematic review of qualitative studies. J Cancer Surviv. 2015 Jun;9(2):260-8. doi: 10.1007/s11764-014-0407-x. Epub 2014 Oct 25.
  8. Klemp JR. Survivorship care planning: one size does not fit all. Semin Oncol Nurs. 2015 Feb;31(1):67-72. doi: 10.1016/j.soncn.2014.11.008. Epub 2014 Dec 3.
  9. Palos GR, Lewis-Patterson P, Gilmore K, DeJesus Y, Rodriguez AM. Changing Nursing Practice in Survivorship Care With Clinical Decision Tools. Clin J Oncol Nurs. 2015 Aug 1;19(4):482-4. doi: 10.1188/15.CJON.482-484.
  10. Railton C, Lupichuk S, McCormick J, Zhong L, Ko JJ, Walley B, Joy AA, Giese-Davis J. Discharge to Primary Care for Survivorship Follow-Up: How Are Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Faring? J Natl Compr Canc Netw. 2015 Jun;13(6):762-71.
  11. Warrington L, Absolom K, Velikova G. Integrated care pathways for cancer survivors - a role for patient-reported outcome measures and health informatics. Acta Oncol. 2015 May;54(5):600-8. doi: 10.3109/0284186X.2014.995778. Epub 2015 Mar 9.
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Sept. 16, 2015, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar
Marilyn Vache
Marilyn J. Vaché, MD, PA; Austin TMS Clinic for Depression

Sept. 16 - 2015

Register for Webinar or Lecture Hall in Austin for CE Credit or Certificate of Attendance
Register for Webinar Only for No CE Credit or Certificate of Attendance

If attending in the Lecture Hall (K-100) in Austin by the Lobby (see map) for no continuing education credit or a certificate of attendance, no pre-registration is required. Simply sign in when you arrive.

Assessing Emerging Treatments for Depression

TRAIN Course ID: 1059038
Presenter: Marilyn J. Vaché, MD, PA; Austin TMS Clinic for Depression
Description: This discussion of therapies will briefly review recently-approved antidepressants, neuromodulation therapies, and integrative approaches to treating depression.
Three new medications continue the traditional focus on serotonin and norepinephrine pathways as therapeutic targets; they include vilazidone, vortioxetine, and levomilnacipran. Ketamine, much discussed as another new treatment, albeit still in the research phase, targets NMDA receptors and glutamate. Integrative approaches emphasize underlying whole body imbalances such as inflammation, nutrition, digestion, structural problems, toxicity, and energy production. Neuromodulation therapies target brain plasticity through electromagnetic and electrical stimuli. In the last 20 years researchers have studied exogenous brain stimulation for a variety of therapeutic goals: treating depression, Tourette's syndrome, migraines, postoperative pain, autism, schizophrenia, stroke recovery, and others. In 2008 the FDA cleared a medical device using transcranial magnetic stimulation to treat depression, and this talk will review the research that led to its approval, subsequent research that confirms its value and durability, and statistics from one private practice setting using this device since 2009.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™; 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC); Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFT); Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors (LCDC) Registered Sanitarians, and certificate of attendance; Professional development hours for licensed psychologists will be awarded.
Presentation documents: coming soon
Suggested resources: coming soon


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Sept. 23, 2015, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Melissa Loe
Melissa Loe, Communication Manager, DSHS

Carrie Williams
Carrie Williams, Director of Media Relations, DSHS

sept 23 - 2015

Register for Webinar or Lecture Hall in Austin for CE Credit or Certificate of Attendance
Register for Webinar Only for No CE Credit or Certificate of Attendance

If attending in the Lecture Hall (K-100) in Austin by the Lobby (see map) for no continuing education credit or a certificate of attendance, no pre-registration is required. Simply sign in when you arrive.

Case Studies in Communications: An Insider’s Guide for Tackling Topics, From Routine to Difficult

TRAIN Course ID: 1058886
Presenters: Melissa Loe, Communication Manager, DSHS and Carrie Williams, Director of Media Relations, DSHS
Description: How do you deliver a hard or sensitive message? Whether it’s talking to patient, your neighbor, the news media, stakeholders or even your parents, some topics are difficult to broach or explore because of their complexities, nuances and the emotional components they may carry. Talking gently yet directly about challenging matters is … a challenge. And, the landscape of communications is rapidly changing – from texting and smartphones to the power of social media and a 24-hour news cycle – and consideration must be given to these advances as we communicate with audiences. During this session, you will discover evidence-based ways to tackle different topics – from the routine to the difficult – through real examples. You will learn about the most common pitfalls in communications and how to avoid them. Ethical considerations and balancing competing messages will be discussed. What you say and how you say it drive how people see you, your agency and your values. Good communication skills are at the core of how you live and work. Good communication can save lives.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™; 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, and Certificate of Attendance

Presentation documents: coming soon
Suggested resources: coming soon


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Sept. 30, 2015, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar
rajendia parikh
Rajendia Parikh, MD, Medicaid Medical Director, HHSC

sept 30 - 2015

Register for Webinar or Lecture Hall in Austin for CE Credit or Certificate of Attendance
Register for Webinar Only for No CE Credit or Certificate of Attendance

If attending in the Lecture Hall (K-100) in Austin by the Lobby (see map) for no continuing education credit or a certificate of attendance, no pre-registration is required. Simply sign in when you arrive.

Eastern Perspectives on Death and Dying and Concept of “Self”

TRAIN Course ID: 1058929
Presenter: Rajendia Parikh, MD, Medicaid Medical Director, HHSC
Description: The United States is rapidly transforming into a multicultural society where interfaith dialog and understanding diverse viewpoints about the meaning and purpose of life is an important aspect of a civil society. With this transformation, it’s important to acknowledge that the foundational beliefs, derived from eastern metaphysics, of different groups of people vary significantly.  A significant segment of immigrant physicians and a sizable group of second generation US medical graduates come from a completely different theological background then the majority of the population. Addressing these differences fosters better communication and understanding between patients and health care providers. Please join Dr. Rajendia Parikh for an intriguing discussion of the concept of “Self”, meaning and purpose of life, death and a subsequent journey into unknown, primarily derived from prevailing theological concepts of eastern philosophy. These factors can have profound implications on delivery of health care when decisions about death, dying and end of life care becomes a paramount concern.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™; 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers (SW); Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC); Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFT); Registered Sanitarians (RS), and Certificate of Attendance Ethics credit will be offered for this presentation. Professional development credit will be offered to licensed psychologists.
Presentation documents: coming soon
Suggested resources: coming soon


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Grand Rounds Presentations
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Last updated August 20, 2015