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    Grand Rounds contact:
    grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


    Continuing Education contact:
    ce.service@dshs.state.tx.us


    TRAIN Texas contact:
    txtrain@dshs.state.tx.us

Presentations

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2015 Spring Schedule - Revised

Spring 2015 Semester

The Spring 2015 semester of Grand Rounds begins on April 8 and ends on May 13, 2015. All presentations are free and were on Wednesdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Central Time in Austin (K-100 Lecture Hall at 1100 W. 49th Street, see map) or via webinar.

Please note: CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.

Past Presentations

Questions? E-mail grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


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April 8, 2015, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Wendy Chung
Wendy Chung, MD, Dallas County Health Department

Grace Kubin
Grace Kubin, PhD, Director Laboratory Services, DSHS

Jeff Hoogheem
Jeff Hoogheem, Deputy Director, Community Preparedness, DSHS
The Texas Ebola Experience
2015-4-8 Texas Ebola Experience

TRAIN Course ID: 1056429
Presenters: Wendy Chung, MD, Chief Epidemiologist, Dallas County Health Department; Grace Kubin, PhD, Director Laboratory Services, DSHS; and Jeff Hoogheem, Deputy Director, Community Preparedness, DSHS
Description: There have been over 23,000 cases of Ebola and more than 9,300 deaths worldwide since the current epidemic began in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization. In 2014, Thomas Eric Duncan became the first person diagnosed with the Ebola virus in the United States. What followed was a landmark mobilization effort to trace and contain the disease. Please join Wendy Chung, MD, Chief Epidemiologist Dallas County Health Department; Grace Kubin, PhD, Director Laboratory Services, DSHS; and Jeff Hoogheem, Deputy Director, Community Preparedness, DSHS for a discussion of the Dallas Ebola experience.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™; 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC); Registered Sanitarians; and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Baize S, Pannetier D, Oestereich L, et al. Emergence of Zaire Ebola virus disease in Guinea. N Engl J Med. 2014;371(15):1418-25. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1404505.
  2. Benowitz I, Ackelsberg J, Balter SE, et al. Surveillance and preparedness for Ebola virus disease -- New York City, 2014. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014;63(41):934-6.
  3. Bishop BM. Potential and emerging treatment options for Ebola virus disease. Ann Pharmacother. 2015;49(2):196-206. doi: 10.1177/1060028014561227.
  4. Brown CM, Aranas AE, Benenson GA, et al. Airport exit and entry screening for Ebola--August-November 10, 2014 [erratum, MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014 Dec 19;63(50):1212]. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014;63(49):1163-7.
  5. Chevalier MS, Chung W, Smith J, et al. Ebola virus disease cluster in the United States--Dallas County, Texas, 2014 [erratum, MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014 Dec 5;63(48):1139]. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014;63(46):1087-8.
  6. Chiappelli F, Bakhordarian A, Thames AD, et al. Ebola: translational science considerations. J Transl Med. 2015;13(1):11.
  7. Del Rio C, Mehta AK, Lyon GM 3rd, Guarner J. Ebola hemorrhagic fever in 2014: the tale of an evolving epidemic. Ann Intern Med. 2014;161(10):746-8. doi: 10.7326/M14-1880.
  8. Feldmann H, Geisbert TW. Ebola haemorrhagic fever. Lancet. 2011;377(9768):849-62. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60667-8.
  9. Fischer WA 2nd, Hynes NA, Perl TM. Protecting health care workers from Ebola: personal protective equipment is critical but is not enough. Ann Intern Med. 2014;161(10):753-4. doi: 10.7326/M14-1953.
  10. Klompas M, Diekema DJ, Fishman NO, Yokoe DS. Ebola fever: reconciling planning with risk in U.S. hospitals. Ann Intern Med. 2014;161(10):751-2. doi: 10.7326/M14-1918.
  11. Kortepeter MG, Smith PW, Hewlett A, Cieslak TJ. Caring for patients with Ebola: a challenge in any care facility. Ann Intern Med. 2015;162(1):68-9. doi: 10.7326/M14-2289.
  12. McCarty CL, Basler C, Karwowski M, et al. Response to importation of a case of Ebola virus disease--Ohio, October 2014. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014;63(46):1089-91.
  13. Morgan D, Braun B, Milstone A, et al. Lessons learned from hospital Ebola preparation. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. Web. (April 1, 2015).
  14. Palmore T, Barrett K, Michelin A, et al. Challenges in managing patients who have suspected or confirmed Ebola virus at the National Institutes of Health. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. Web. (April 1, 2015).
  15. Shuaib F, Gunnala R, Musa EO, et al. Ebola virus disease outbreak - Nigeria, July-September 2014. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014;63(39):867-72.
  16. Smith CL, Hughes SM, Karwowski MP, et al. Addressing needs of contacts of Ebola patients during an investigation of an Ebola cluster in the United States - Dallas, Texas, 2014. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015;64(5):121-3.
  17. Sprecher AG, Caluwaerts A, Draper M, et al. Personal Protective Equipment for Filovirus Epidemics: A Call for Better Evidence [published online ahead of print March 27, 2015]. J Infect Dis.
  18. Stein RA. What is Ebola? Int J Clin Pract. 2015;69(1):49-58. doi:10.1111/ijcp.12593.
  19. Yacisin K, Balter S, Fine A, et al. Ebola virus disease in a humanitarian aid worker - New York City, October 2014. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015;64(12):321-3.

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April 15, 2015, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Nathan Allen
Nathan Allen, MD, FACEP, Baylor College of Medicine
Ethical Issues in New Medical Technologies and Emerging Infectious Diseases
2015-4-15 Ethical Issues in New Medical Technologies and Emerging Infectious Diseases

TRAIN Course ID: 1056434
Presenter: Nathan Allen, MD, FACEP, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Medical Ethics, Program Director, GME; Ethics Professionalism and Policy Program Section of Emergency Medicine, Dept. of Medicine Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Baylor College of Medicine
Description: Healthcare technology is advancing at a breakneck pace; it seems like each day a new technology is created bringing with it the promise of improved health and increased care options. While innovations like Extracorporeal Membranous Oxygenation (ECMO), destination mechanical circulatory support devices, and 3D-bioprinting bring potential hope to the public and medical community, they also raise a host of new ethical questions. Simultaneously, emerging infectious diseases such as the ongoing Ebola virus disease outbreak are changing the healthcare landscape in Texas and the United States and add a new dimension to existing ethical debates. During this session, participants will explore the ethical challenges brought about by new medical technologies and emerging infectious diseases using illustrative cases to examine the ethical questions that we can answer and those that we need to answer to cope with the pace of change in technology and infectious disease.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™; 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians; and certificate of attendance. ETHICS CREDIT WILL BE AWARDED
This course has been designated by Texas Department of State Health Services, Continuing Education Service for 1.5 credit(s) of education in medical ethics and/or professional responsibility.
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Bruce CR, Allen NG, Fahy BN, Gordon HL, Suarez EE, Bruckner BA. Challenges in deactivating a total artificial heart for a patient with capacity. Chest. 2014;145(3):625-31. doi: 10.1378/chest.13-1103.
  2. Bruce CR. Lessons learned from the case of Sarah Murnaghan. J Heart Lung Transplant. 2013;32(9):937-8. doi: 10.1016/j.healun.2013.06.010.
  3. Dudzinski DM. Ethics guidelines for destination therapy. Ann Thorac Surg. 2006;81(4):1185-8.
  4. Evans RW. The Sarah Murnaghan debacle: a health policy perspective on transplant candidate selection. J Heart Lung Transplant. 2013;32(9):868-70. doi: 10.1016/j.healun.2013.07.009.
  5. Joffe S. Evaluating novel therapies during the Ebola epidemic. JAMA. 2014;312(13):1299-300. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.12867.
  6. Mello MM, Wolf LE. The Havasupai Indian tribe case--lessons for research involving stored biologic samples. N Engl J Med.  2010;363(3):204-7.
  7. Meltzer EC, Ivascu NS, Acres CA, et al. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adults: a brief review and ethical considerations for nonspecialist health providers and hospitalists. J Hosp Med. 2014;9(12):808-13. doi: 10.1002/jhm.2262.
  8. Rady MY, Verheijde JL. End-of-life discontinuation of destination therapy with cardiac and ventilatory support medical devices: physician-assisted death or allowing the patient to die? BMC Med Ethics. 2010;11:15. doi: 10.1186/1472-6939-11-15.
  9. Ramanathan K, Cove ME, Caleb MG, Teoh KL, Maclaren G. Ethical dilemmas of adult ECMO: emerging conceptual challenges. J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2015;29(1):229-33. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2014.07.015.
  10. Rizzieri AG, Verheijde JL, Rady MY, McGregor JL. Ethical challenges with the left ventricular assist device as a destination therapy. Philos Ethics Humanit Med. 2008;3:20. doi: 10.1186/1747-5341-3-20.
  11. Vayena E, Salathé M, Madoff LC, Brownstein JS. Ethical challenges of big data in public health. PLoS Comput Biol. 2015;11(2):e1003904. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003904.
  12. Venkat A, Wolf L, Geiderman JM, et al. Ethical issues in the response to Ebola virus disease in US emergency departments: a position paper of the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. J Emerg Nurs. 2015;41(2):e5-e16. doi: 10.1016/j.jen.2015.01.012.

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April 22, 2015, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

James Rogers
James Rogers, MD, Texas Dept. of Family Protective Services

Lisa Glenn
Lisa Glenn, MD, Texas Dept. of Aging and Disability Services

Michael Murray
Michael Murray, MD, Texas Dept. of Aging and Disability Services
Monitoring of Psychotropic Medications: Initiatives in Texas Foster Care, State Supported Living Centers, and Nursing Facilities
2015-4-22 Monitoring of Psychotropic Medications

TRAIN Course ID: 1056431
Presenters: James Rogers, MD, Texas Dept. of Family Protective Services; Lisa Glenn, MD, Texas Dept. of Aging and Disability Services; and Michael Murray, MD, Texas Dept. of Aging and Disability Services
Description: Psychotropic medications have been both praised for their ability to restore function to individuals with mental illness and condemned as a chemical restraint to modify behavior. Texas has responded to the challenge with monitoring initiatives focused on specific populations to ensure appropriate and safe use of these medications. Join Drs. James Rogers, Michael Murray, and Lisa Glenn to learn what Texas is doing to improve the health of these vulnerable individuals.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™; 1.5 contact hours for Licensed Psychologists; Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC); Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFT); Registered Sanitarians (RS); and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

  • Slides (pdf)
  • Handout (pdf)
  • Webinar recording
    CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.
  • Additional Q&A
    1.  What will be the criteria to become a Certified Dementia Practitioner in a nursing home?
    You must take the Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Care training offered and then send in the application and pay the fee for the certification. Here is the website for more information: http://www.nccdp.org/. If you are interested in learning more about the training, please email TQM@dads.state.tx.us for information.

    2. Have you collaborated with UT Center for Disability Studies to provide Person Centered Thinking training? 
    We began working with them in 2013. Since then, six DADS staff have become certified train-the-trainers and there are 48 more who are in the process of becoming certified trainers.

    3. Can you say a bit more about strategies or evidenced-based programs designed to reduce usage of AP in nursing homes? What states are making the greatest progress and how are they achieving their reductions?
    For the evidence-based programs and strategies, please go to our Texas Quality Matters website:  Antipsychotic Medications and Dementia focus area at http://www.dads.state.tx.us/qualitymatters/qcp/antipsychotic/nf.html. We have not looked at other states to find out their strategies but are in the process of talking to nursing facilities in Texas who have made the greatest changes to find out the reasons for their success.

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. National partnership to improve dementia care in nursing homes. Updated March 18, 2015.
  2. Correll CU. Monitoring and management of antipsychotic-related metabolic and endocrine adverse events in pediatric patients. Int Rev Psychiatry. 2008;20(2):195-201.
  3. Correll CU, Kratochvil CJ, March JS. Developments in pediatric psychopharmacology: focus on stimulants, antidepressants, and antipsychotics. J Clin Psychiatry. 2011;722:655-70.
  4. Maust DT, Kim HM, Seyfried LS, et al. Antipsychotics, other psychotropics, and the risk of death in patients with dementia: number needed to harm [published online ahead of print March 18, 2015]. JAMA Psychiatry. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.3018.
  5. Pliszka SR, American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Work Group on Quality Issues. Practice parameter for the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2007;46:894-921.
  6. Smith DA, Guest K. Is education all that's needed to reduce inappropriate drugs in long-term care? J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2015;16(1):9-11. doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2014.10.002.
  7. Subcommittee on Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Steering Committee on Quality Improvement and Management. ADHD: clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents. Pediatrics. 2011;128:1007-22.
  8. Texas Department of Family and Protective Services. Psychotropic medications - a guide to medical services at CPS.
  9. US Department of Health and Human Services – Office of the Inspector General. Medicare atypical antipsychotic drug claims for elderly nursing home residents. Published May 4, 2011.
  10. US Government Accountability Office. Antipsychotic drug use: HHS has initiatives to reduce use among older adults in nursing homes, but should expand efforts to other settings. Published January 30, 2015.

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April 29, 2015, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Kevin Hwang
Kevin Hwang, MD, MPH, University of Texas Medical School at Houston
Health Information Technology for Hypertension and Diabetes
2015-4-29 Health Information Technology for Hypertension and Diabetes

TRAIN Course ID: 1056432
Presenter: Kevin Hwang, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston
Description: Health information technology (HIT) is transforming the experience of patients, providers, and other stakeholders in our health care system. Kevin O. Hwang MD, MPH will describe the major types of HIT tools and examine opportunities to improve quality of care, health behavior, and health outcomes in patients with hypertension and diabetes. An emphasis will be placed on the role of HIT in population health management, which is becoming increasingly important as organizations adapt to new models of health care delivery and reimbursement. Dr. Hwang will also discuss the importance of assembling a diverse team of health care professionals and other personnel in order to take full advantage of the opportunities afforded by HIT.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™; 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians; and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Ahmad FS, Tsang T. Diabetes prevention, health information technology, and meaningful use: challenges and opportunities. Am J Prev Med. 2013;44(4 Suppl 4):S357-63. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2012.12.020.
  2. Alexander S, Frith KH, O'Keefe L, Hennigan MA. Implementation of customized health information technology in diabetes self management programs. Clin Nurse Spec. 2011;25(2):63-70. doi: 10.1097/NUR.0b013e31820aefd6.
  3. Goldstein MK. Using health information technology to improve hypertension management. Curr Hypertens Rep. 2008;10(3):201-7.
  4. Kaufman N. Using health information technology to prevent and treat diabetes. Diabetes Technol Ther. 2013;15 Suppl 1:S60-74. doi: 10.1089/dia.2013.1507. Review.
  5. López L, Grant RW. Closing the gap: eliminating health care disparities among Latinos with diabetes using health information technology tools and patient navigators. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2012;6(1):169-76.
  6. Millery M, Shelley D, Wu D, Ferrari P, Tseng TY, Kopal H. Qualitative evaluation to explain success of multifaceted technology-driven hypertension intervention. Am J Manag Care. 2011;17(12 Spec No.):SP95-102.
  7. Or CK, Tao D. Does the use of consumer health information technology improve outcomes in the patient self-management of diabetes? A meta-analysis and narrative review of randomized controlled trials. Int J Med Inform. 2014;83(5):320-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2014.01.009.
  8. Pandya SM. The secret to health information technology's success within the diabetes patient population: a comprehensive privacy and security framework. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2010;4(3):740-3.
  9. Schiøtz M, Frølich A, Krasnik A, Taylor W, Hsu J. Social organization of self-management support of persons with diabetes: a health systems comparison. Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012;30(3):189-94. doi:
    10.3109/02813432.2012.704810.
  10. Shelley D, Tseng TY, Matthews AG, et al. Technology-driven intervention to improve hypertension outcomes in community health centers. Am J Manag Care. 2011;17(12 Spec No.):SP103-10.

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May 6, 2015, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Alice Gong
Alice K. Gong, MD, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Alexander Kenton
Alexander Kenton, MD, Pediatrix Medical Group of Texas-San Antonio

The Importance of Breast Milk Use in the NICU
2015-5-6 Importance of Breast Milk Use in the NICU

TRAIN Course ID: 1056502
Presenters: Alice K. Gong, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, Rita and William Head Distinguished Professor of Environmental and Developmental Neonatology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio;  Alexander Kenton, MD, Pediatrix Medical Group of Texas-San Antonio
Description: Human milk is probably the least appreciated but the most beneficial source of nutrition for infants in the NICU. Many NICUs however have failed to provide the resources to ensure human milk be the primary source of nutrition for infants. Join us as we review the variety of benefits human milk use imparts upon those infants who receive it. The individual components that make up these benefits will be described. We will then outline the short and long term implications of human milk use on morbidity and mortality of our NICU patients. 
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™; 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians; and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.oming soon

  1. Ahrabi AF, Schanler RJ. Human milk is the only milk for premies in the NICU! Early Hum Dev. 2013;89 Suppl 2:S51-3. doi: 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2013.08.006.
  2. Alves E, Rodrigues C, Fraga S, Barros H, Silva S. Parents' views on factors that help or hinder breast milk supply in neonatal care units: systematic review. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2013;98(6):F511-7. doi:10.1136/archdischild-2013-304029.
  3. Bartick M, Reinhold A. The burden of suboptimal breastfeeding in the United States: a pediatric cost analysis. Pediatrics. 2010;125(5):e1048-56. doi: 10.1542/peds.2009-1616.
  4. Carroll K. Body dirt or liquid gold? How the 'safety' of donated breastmilk is constructed for use in neonatal intensive care. Soc Stud Sci. 2014;44(3):466-85.
  5. Cristofalo EA, Schanler RJ, Blanco CL, et al. Randomized trial of exclusive human milk versus preterm formula diets in extremely premature infants. J Pediatr. 2013;163(6):1592-1595.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.07.011.
  6. Eglash A, Montgomery A, Wood J. Breastfeeding. Dis Mon. 2008;54(6):343-411. doi: 10.1016/j.disamonth.2008.03.001.
  7. Fitzgibbons SC, Ching Y, Yu D, et al. Mortality of necrotizing enterocolitis expressed by birth weight categories. J Pediatr Surg. 2009;44(6):1072-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2009.02.013.
  8. Ganapathy V, Hay JW, Kim JH, Lee ML, Rechtman DJ. Long term healthcare costs of infants who survived neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis: a retrospective longitudinal study among infants enrolled in Texas Medicaid. BMC Pediatr. 2013;13:127. doi: 10.1186/1471-2431-13-127.
  9. Gdalevich M, Mimouni D, Mimouni M. Breast-feeding and the risk of bronchial asthma in childhood: a systematic review with meta-analysis of prospective studies. J Pediatr. 2001;139(2):261-6.
  10. Giannì ML, Roggero P, Amato O, et al. Intervention for promoting breast milk use in neonatal intensive care unit: a pilot study. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2014;27(5):475-8. doi:10.3109/14767058.2013.818971.
  11. Good M, Sodhi CP, Egan CE, et al. Breast milk protects against the development of necrotizing enterocolitis through inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 in the intestinal epithelium via activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor [published online ahead of print April 22, 2015]. Mucosal Immunol. doi: 10.1038/mi.2015.30.
  12. Hassiotou F, Geddes DT, Hartmann PE. Cells in human milk: state of the science. J Hum Lact. 2013;29(2):171-82. doi: 10.1177/0890334413477242
    Holman RC, Stoll BJ, Curns AT, Yorita KL, Steiner CA, Schonberger LB. Necrotising enterocolitis hospitalisations among neonates in the United States. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2006;20(6):498-506.
  13. Horbar JD, Badger GJ, Carpenter JH, et al. Trends in mortality and morbidity for very low birth weight infants, 1991-1999. Pediatrics. 2002;110(1 Pt 1):143-51.
  14. Johnson TJ, Patel AL, Bigger HR, Engstrom JL, Meier PP. Economic benefits and costs of human milk feedings: a strategy to reduce the risk of prematurity-related morbidities in very-low-birth-weight infants. Adv Nutr. 2014;5(2):207-12. doi: 10.3945/an.113.004788.
  15. Kim JH, Chan CS, Vaucher YE, Stellwagen LM. Challenges in the practice of human milk nutrition in the neonatal intensive care unit. Early Hum Dev. 2013;89 Suppl 2:S35-8. doi:10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2013.08.002.
  16. Meier PP, Bode L. Health, nutrition, and cost outcomes of human milk feedings for very low birthweight infants. Adv Nutr. 2013;4(6):670-1. doi:10.3945/an.113.004457.
  17. Neu J, Walker WA. Necrotizing enterocolitis. N Engl J Med. 2011;364(3):255-64. doi: 10.1056/NEJMra1005408.
  18. Neu J. Neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis: an update. Acta Paediatr Suppl. 2005;94(449):100-5.
  19. Owen CG, Martin RM, Whincup PH, Smith GD, Cook DG. Does breastfeeding influence risk of type 2 diabetes in later life? A quantitative analysis of published evidence. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;84(5):1043-54.
  20. Parker MG, Barrero-Castillero A, Corwin BK, Kavanagh PL, Belfort MB, Wang CJ. Pasteurized human donor milk use among US level 3 neonatal intensive care units. J Hum Lact. 2013;29(3):381-9. doi:10.1177/0890334413492909.
  21. Perrine CG, Scanlon KS. Prevalence of use of human milk in US advanced care neonatal units. Pediatrics. 2013;131(6):1066-71. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-3823.
  22. Quigley M, McGuire W. Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014;4:CD002971. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD002971.pub3.
  23. Rosenbauer J, Herzig P, Giani G. Early infant feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus-a nationwide population-based case-control study in pre-school children. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2008;24(3):211-22.
  24. Rossman B, Kratovil AL, Greene MM, Engstrom JL, Meier PP. "I have faith in my milk": the meaning of milk for mothers of very low birth weight infants hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit. J Hum Lact. 2013;29(3):359-65. doi: 10.1177/0890334413484552.
  25. Sadauskaite-Kuehne V, Ludvigsson J, Padaiga Z, Jasinskiene E, Samuelsson U. Longer breastfeeding is an independent protective factor against development of type 1 diabetes mellitus in childhood. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2004;20(2):150-7.
  26. Shugart J. Mother lode: superhero sugars in breast milk make the newborn gut safe for beneficial bacteria. Sci News. December 27, 2013. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/mother-lode.
  27. Sullivan S, Schanler RJ, Kim JH, et al. An exclusively human milk-based diet is associated with a lower rate of necrotizing enterocolitis than a diet of human milk and bovine milk-based products. J Pediatr. 2010;156(4):562-7.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2009.
  28. Vohr BR, Poindexter BB, Dusick AM, et al. Persistent beneficial effects of breast milk ingested in the neonatal intensive care unit on outcomes of extremely low birth weight infants at 30 months of age. Pediatrics. 2007;120(4):e953-9.
  29. Yan J, Liu L, Zhu Y, Huang G, Wang PP. The association between breastfeeding and childhood obesity: a meta-analysis. BMC Public Health. 2014;14:1267. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1267.
  30. Zhang BB, LaFleur EA, Ballweg DD, et al. Use of healthcare failure mode and effect analysis (HFMEA) to quantify risks of the human milk feeding process. J Nurs Care Qual. 2014;29(1):30-7. doi:10.1097/NCQ.0b013e3182a61555.

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May 13, 2015, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar


The May 13 presentation is cancelled.
 
Grand Rounds Presentations
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Last updated May 08, 2015