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    Grand Rounds contact:
    grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


    Continuing Education contact:
    ce.service@dshs.state.tx.us


    TRAIN Texas contact:
    txtrain@dshs.state.tx.us

Presentations

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Fall 2014 schedule

Fall 2014 Semester

The Fall 2014 semester of Grand Rounds begins on October 8 and ends on November 12, 2014. All presentations are free and are on Wednesdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Central Time in Austin (K-100 Lecture Hall at 1100 W. 49th Street, see map) or via webinar.

Please note: CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.

Past Presentations

Questions? E-mail grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


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October 8, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Alva Ferdinand

Alva O. Ferdinand, DrPH, JD, Assistant Professor, A&M Univ. School of Public Health
2014-10-8-Texting-Bans-and-Roadway-Safety

Texting Bans and Roadway Safety
TRAIN Course ID:
1053281
Presenter: Alva O. Ferdinand, DrPH, JD, Assistant Professor, A&M University School of Public Health
Description: Have you ever read or sent a text message while driving and then had to slam on the brakes to avoid hitting another car? Or have you missed an exit or turn because you were distracted by a phone call? Distracted driving is a dangerous epidemic on America's roadways.  The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has estimated that approximately 80% of all crashes involve some type of distraction. It was estimated that in 2011, 387,000 persons were injured in crashes involving a distracted driver.  Moreover, in 2012 alone, 3,328 individuals were killed in crashes involving a distracted driver. Interestingly, distracted driving is far more of a problem in the United States than in Europe. Dr. Alva O. Ferdinand, DrPH, JD, Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health will be sharing research findings and their implications for public health.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians; and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Alosco ML, Spitznagel MB, Fischer KH, et al. Both texting and eating are associated with impaired simulated driving performance. Traffic Inj Prev. 2012;13(5):468-75.
  2. Buchanan L, Avtgis T, Gray D, Channel J, Wilson A. Wr u txting b4 u crashed? W V Med J. 2013;109(1):18-21.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Mobile device use while driving--United States and seven European countries, 2011. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2013;62(10):177-82.
  4. Cook JL, Jones RM. Texting and accessing the web while driving: traffic citations and crashes among young adult drivers. Traffic Inj Prev. 2011;12(6):545-9.
  5. Ferdinand AO, Menachemi N. Associations between driving performance and engaging in secondary tasks: a systematic review. Am J Public Health. 2014;104(3):e39-48.
  6. Ferdinand AO, Menachemi N, Sen B, Blackburn JL, Morrisey M, Nelson L. Impact of texting laws on motor vehicular fatalities in the United States. Am J Public Health. 2014;104(8):1370-7.
  7. Gauld CS, Lewis I, White KM. Concealing their communication: exploring psychosocial predictors of young drivers' intentions and engagement in concealed texting. Accid Anal Prev. 2014;62:285-93.
  8. Hoff J, Grell J, Lohrman N, et al. Distracted driving and implications for injury prevention in adults. J Trauma Nurs. 2013;20(1):31-4.
  9. Issar NM, Kadakia RJ, Tsahakis JM, et al. The link between texting and motor vehicle collision frequency in the orthopaedic trauma population. J Inj Violence Res. 2013;5(2):95-100.
  10. McKeever JD, Schultheis MT, Padmanaban V, Blasco A. Driver performance while texting: even a little is too much. Traffic Inj Prev. 2013;14(2):132-7.
  11. National Safety Council. Understanding the distracted brain: why driving while using hands-free cell phones is risky behavior. http://www.nsc.org/safety_road/Distracted_Driving/Documents/Cognitive Distraction White Paper.pdf. Published April 2012.
  12. Olsen EO, Shults RA, Eaton DK. Texting while driving and other risky motor vehicle behaviors among US high school students. Pediatrics. 2013;131(6):e1708-15.
  13. Sawyer BD, Hancock PA. Assisted entry mitigates text messaging-based driving detriment. Work. 2012;41(suppl 1):4279-82.
  14. Sundin A, Patten CJ, Bergmark M, Hedberg A, Iraeus IM, Pettersson I. Methodical aspects of text testing in a driving simulator. Work. 2012;41(suppl 1):5053-6.

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October 15, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar
Kellogg

Nancy Kellogg, MD, Professor and Division Chief of Child Abuse, Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of Texas Health Science Center - San Antonio

2014-10-15-child-sexual-abuse

Child Sexual Abuse: Are We Looking the Wrong Way?
TRAIN Course ID:
1053285
Presenter: Nancy Kellogg, MD, Professor and Division Chief of Child Abuse, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center - San Antonio.
Description: Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a disturbing and difficult issue. Most sexual abusers know the child they abuse. Physical indicators are uncommon. Victims are usually first identified when they tell someone. Health care providers must equip themselves with the skills and resources to meet the needs of the children they serve. Early recognition and reporting are necessary to eliminate the problem of CSA. No child should be a victim of this crime. Please join nationally renowned Nancy Kellogg, MD for a thought provoking discussion of the issues surrounding child sexual abuse.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: Ethics Credit will be offered. 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Licensed Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC); Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFT); Registered Sanitarians; and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:
Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.
  1. Canders CP, Merchant RC, Pleet K, Fuerch JH. Internet-initiated sexual assault among U.S. adolescents reported in newspapers, 1996-2007. J Child Sex Abus. 2013;22(8):987-99.
  2. Finkel MA. Children's disclosures of child sexual abuse. Pediatr Ann. 2012;41(12):e1-6.
  3. Jenny C, Crawford-Jakubiak JE; Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect; American Academy of Pediatrics. The evaluation of children in the primary care setting when sexual abuse is suspected. Pediatrics. 2013;132(2):e558-67.
  4. Malloy LC, Brubacher SP, Lamb ME. "Because she's one who listens": children discuss disclosure recipients in forensic interviews. Child Maltreat. 2013;18(4):245-51.
  5. McElvaney R, Greene S, Hogan D. To tell or not to tell? factors influencing young people's informal disclosures of child sexual abuse. J Interpers Violence. 2014;29(5):928-47.
  6. Pérez-Fuentes G, Olfson M, Villegas L, Morcillo C, Wang S, Blanco C. Prevalence and correlates of child sexual abuse: a national study. Compr Psychiatry. 2013;54(1):16-27.
  7. Schönbucher V, Maier T, Mohler-Kuo M, Schnyder U, Landolt MA. Disclosure of child sexual abuse by adolescents: a qualitative in-depth study. J Interpers Violence. 2012;27(17):3486-513.

Presenter slideshow references:

  1. Finkelhor D, Shattuck A, Turner HA, Hamby SL. The lifetime prevalence of child sexual abuse and sexual assault assessed in late adolescence. J Adolesc Health. 2014;55(3):329-33.
  2. Humphrey JA, White JW. Women's vulnerability to sexual assault from adolescence to young adulthood. J Adolesc Health. 2000;27(6):419-24.
  3. Finkelhor D, Jones L. Trends in child maltreatment. Lancet. 2012;379(9831):2048-9.
  4. Mitchell KJ, Finkelhor D, Wolak J. Risk factors for and impact of online sexual solicitation of youth. JAMA. 2001;285(23):3011-4.
  5. Schwartz RH, Milteer R, LeBeau MA. Drug-facilitated sexual assault ('date rape'). South Med J. 2000;93(6):558-61.
  6. Mitchell KJ, Finkelhor D, Jones LM, Wolak J. Prevalence and characteristics of youth sexting: a national study. Pediatrics. 2012;129(1):13-20. 
  7. Kellogg ND, Menard SW. Violence among family members of children and adolescents evaluated for sexual abuse. Child Abuse Negl. 2003;27(12):1367-76.
  8. Kellogg ND, Huston RL. Unwanted sexual experiences in adolescents. Patterns of disclosure. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1995;34(6):306-12.
  9. Kellogg ND, Parra JM, Menard S. Children with anogenital symptoms and signs referred for sexual abuse evaluations. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1998;152(7):634-41.
  10. Gavril AR, Kellogg ND, Nair P. Value of follow-up examinations of children and adolescents evaluated for sexual abuse and assault. Pediatrics. 2012;129(2):282-9.
  11. Shapiro RA, Makoroff KL. Sexually transmitted diseases in sexually abused girls and adolescents. Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 2006;18(5):492-7.
  12. Heger A, Ticson L, Velasquez O, Bernier R. Children referred for possible sexual abuse: medical findings in 2384 children. Child Abuse Negl. 2002;26(6-7):645-59.
  13. Heger AH, Ticson L, Guerra L, et al. Appearance of the genitalia in girls selected for nonabuse: review of hymenal morphology and nonspecific findings. J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2002;15(1):27-35.
  14. Anderst J, Kellogg N, Jung I. Reports of repetitive penile-genital penetration often have no definitive evidence of penetration. Pediatrics. 2009;124(3):e403-9.
  15. Kellogg ND, Menard SW, Santos A. Genital anatomy in pregnant adolescents: "normal" does not mean "nothing happened". Pediatrics. 2004;113(1 Pt 1):e67-9.
  16. Kellogg ND, Baillargeon J, Lukefahr JL, Lawless K, Menard SW. Comparison of nucleic acid amplification tests and culture techniques in the detection of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis in victims of suspected child sexual abuse. J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2004;17(5):331-9.
  17. McCann J, Miyamoto S, Boyle C, Rogers K. Healing of nonhymenal genital injuries in prepubertal and adolescent girls: a descriptive study. Pediatrics. 2007;120(5):1000-11.
  18. McCann J, Miyamoto S, Boyle C, Rogers K. Healing of hymenal injuries in prepubertal and adolescent girls: a descriptive study. Pediatrics. 2007;119(5):e1094-106.
  19. Friedrich WN, Fisher JL, Dittner CA, et al. Child Sexual Behavior Inventory: normative, psychiatric, and sexual abuse comparisons. Child Maltreat. 2001;6(1):37-49.
  20. Kendall-Tackett KA, Williams LM, Finkelhor D. Impact of sexual abuse on children: a review and synthesis of recent empirical studies. Psychol Bull. 1993;113(1):164-80.
  21. Cosentino CE, Meyer-Bahlburg HF, Alpert JL, Weinberg SL, Gaines R. Sexual behavior problems and psychopathology symptoms in sexually abused girls. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1995;34(8):1033-42.
  22. Kellogg ND; Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect, American Academy of Pediatrics. Clinical report--the evaluation of sexual behaviors in children. Pediatrics. 2009;124(3):992-8.
  23. Kellogg ND. Sexual behaviors in children: evaluation and management. Am Fam Physician. 2010;82(10):1233-8.

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October 22, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

(photo not available)

Garrett Craver, Spindletop MHMR

David Lloyd

David Lloyd, MTM Services

Melissa Brown

Melissa Brown, DSHS

Kellye Mixson

Kellye Mixson, RN, DSHS
2014-10-22 Mystery Shopping

Mystery Shopping in Healthcare Yields "Aha Moments"
TRAIN Course ID:
1053289
Presenters: Garrett Craver, Spindletop MHMR; David Lloyd, MTM Services; Melissa Brown, DSHS; Kellye Mixson, RN, DSHS
Description: Mystery shopping is a quality improvement tool that has been used in the retail and hotel industry for years. Earlier in this decade, the health care industry accounted for only 2% of mystery shoppers. In 2008, the AMA Council on Ethics and Judicial Affairs recommended using mystery shopping to improve patient care. Since then, dozens of hospitals and healthcare organizations around the country have adopted mystery shopping practices that have produced a wide range of "aha moments" for providers and administrators. This panel presentation will examine the experiences of mental health professionals using mystery shopping to become more patient-centered, enhance patient care, and improve outcomes.

Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Licensed Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselors (LCDC); Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC); Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFT); Registered Sanitarians; and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents: 

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Granatino R, Verkamp J, Parker RS. The use of secret shopping as a method of increasing engagement in the healthcare industry: a case study. Int J Healthc Manag. 2013;6(2):114-121.
  2. Rhodes K. Taking the mystery out of "mystery shopper" studies. N Engl J Med. 2011;365(6):484-6.
  3. Rhodes KV, Miller FG. Simulated patient studies: an ethical analysis. Milbank Q. 2012;90(4):706-24.
  4. Sadler C. Shopping bad service. Nurs Stand. 2010;24(50):20-2.
  5. Steinman KJ, Kelleher K, Dembe AE, Wickizer TM, Hemming T. The use of a "mystery shopper" methodology to evaluate children's access to psychiatric services. J Behav Health Serv Res. 2012;39(3):305-13.

Presenters slideshow references:

  1. Lloyd D. How to Deliver Accountable Care: How Behavioral Organizations Meet the Increased Level of External Accountability Requirements. Washington, DC:  National Council for Behavioral Health; 2003.
  2. Lloyd, D, Lloyd, S. Operationalizing Health Reform. Washington, DC:  National Council for Behavioral Health; 2013.
  3. Market Research Society. Guidelines on mystery customer research. https://www.mrs.org.uk/pdf/2011-10-11%20Mystery%20shopping%20guidelines.pdf. Published October 2011.
  4. Wang, Shirley. Health care taps 'mystery shoppers': to improve service, hospitals and doctors hire spies to pose as patients and report back. The Wall Street Journal. August 8, 2006. 
  5. Studer, Q. Hardwiring Excellence: Purpose, Worthwhile Work, & Making a Difference.  Gulf Breeze, FL: Firestarter Publishing; 2004.
  6. Woodcock, EW. Front Office Success: How to Satisfy Consumers and Boost the Bottom Line. Englewood, CO: MGMA; 2010.
  7. Woodcock, EW. Mastering Patient Flow: Using Lean Thinking to Improve Your Practice Operations. Englewood, CO: MGMA; 2007.
  8. Lee, F. If Disney Ran Your Hospital: 9 ½ Things You Can Do Differently.  Bozeman, MT: Second River Healthcare Press; 2004.
  9. Meek, KA. Customer service in health care: optimizing your consumer’s experience. King County Medical Society Bulletin. 2010;89(6):1-5. http://pacificmedicalcenters.org/images/uploads/KCMS_Customer_Service_in_Healthcare.pdf
  10. Scott G. The six elements of customer service: achieving a sustained, organizationwide commitment to excellence improves customer and employee satisfaction. Healthc Exec. 2013;28(1):64-7.
  11. 8 Customer Service Ideas to Enhance Consumer Satisfaction.  MGMA In Practice Blog. http://www.mgma.com/blog/8-customer-service-ideas-to-enhance-patient-satisfaction. Published March 2010.

 


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October 29, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar
Richard Finnell

Richard Finnell, PhD, Director, Genomic Research, Dell Children's Medical Center
2014-10-29-Using Modern Genetic

Using Modern Genetic Tools to Understand Clinical Unknowns
TRAIN Course ID:
1053298
Presenter: Richard Finnell, PhD, Director, Genomic Research, Dell Children's Medical Center
Description: In this presentation, Richard Finnell, PhD, Dell Children's Medical Center will explore how utilizing state-of-the-art, next generation DNA sequencing approaches has led to the identification of novel gene mutations that not only provide a diagnosis of children with previously unknown disorders, but also provide sufficient molecular insights to consider therapeutic interventions. Special emphasis will be placed on children with unknown neurological disorders and consideration of how manipulation of one carbon metabolism might provide therapeutic advances in the treatment of these devastating diseases.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians; and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents: 

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Anderson JA, Hayeems R, Shuman C, et al. Predictive genetic testing for adult-onset disorders in minors: a critical analysis of the arguments for and against the 2013 ACMG guidelines [published online ahead of print July 21, 2014]. Clin Genet. doi: 10.1111/cge.12460
  2. Birnbaum R, Jaffe AE, Hyde TM, Kleinman JE, Weinberger DR. Prenatal expression patterns of genes associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Am J Psychiatry. 2014;171(7):758-67.
  3. Filges I, Friedman JM. Exome sequencing for gene discovery in lethal fetal disorders - harnessing the value of extreme phenotypes [published online ahead of print July 21, 2014]. Prenat Diagn. doi: 10.1002/pd.4464.
  4. Gilissen C, Hehir-Kwa JY, Thung DT, et al. Genome sequencing identifies major causes of severe intellectual disability. Nature. 2014;511(7509):344-7.
  5. Goldman D, Domschke K. Making sense of deep sequencing. Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2014;17(10):1717-25.
  6. Guerreiro R, Brás J, Hardy J, Singleton A. Next generation sequencing techniques in neurological diseases: redefining clinical and molecular associations. Hum Mol Genet. 2014;23(R1):R47-R53.
  7. Han G, Sun J, Wang J, Bai Z, Song F, Lei H. Genomics in Neurological Disorders. Genomics Proteomics Bioinformatics. 2014;12(4):156-163.
  8. Prows CA, Tran G, Blosser B. Whole exome or genome sequencing: nurses need to prepare families for the possibilities [published online ahead of print September 1, 2014]. J Adv Nurs. doi: 10.1111/jan.12516

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November 5, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CST, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Anil Thota


Anil Thota, MBBS, MPH,
Coordinating Scientist and Senior Service Fellow, Office of Public Health Scientific Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
2014-11-5-community-guide

The Community Guide: An Evidence-Based Public Health Resource
TRAIN Course ID:
1053519
Presenter: Anil Thota, MBBS, MPH, Coordinating Scientist and Senior Service Fellow, Office of Public Health Scientific Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Description:
The Community Guide, developed by the independent, non-federal Community Preventive Services Task Force, is a resource for evidence-based recommendations for public health intervention strategies. Over the last 20 years, the Task Force has developed over 200 recommendations on public health programs, policies, and services on issues ranging from tobacco control to injury prevention, from promoting health equity to reducing the burden of mental illness at the population level. The Guide is meant to serve as a resource for decision makers, implementers, practitioners, and researchers at federal and local levels. Additionally, the Guide identifies crucial evidence gaps and economic information while assessing the effectiveness of public health interventions. This presentation featuring Dr. Anil Thota, a coordinating scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Community Guide Branch, will provide an overview of the Community Guide methods and processes and will cover an example intervention review on collaborative care, an integrated, team-based approach to managing depression.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC); Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFT); Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians; and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents: coming soon
Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Ayres CG, Griffith HM. Consensus guidelines: improving the delivery of clinical preventive services. Health Care Manage Rev. 2008;33(4):300-7.
  2. Briss PA, Brownson RC, Fielding JE, Zaza S. Developing and using the Guide to Community Preventive Services: lessons learned about evidence-based public health. Annu Rev Public Health. 2004;25:281-302.
  3. Briss PA, Zaza S, Pappaioanou M, et al. Developing an evidence-based Guide to Community Preventive Services--methods. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services. Am J Prev Med. 2000;18(suppl 1):35-43.
  4. Carande-Kulis VG, Maciosek MV, Briss PA. Methods for systematic reviews of economic evaluations for the Guide to Community Preventive Services. Task Force on Community Preventive Services. Am J Prev Med. 2000;18(suppl 1):75-91.
  5. Chu PL, Nieves-Rivera I, Grinsdale J, et al. A public health framework for developing local preventive services guidelines. Public Health Rep. 2014;129(suppl 1):70-8.
  6. Community Preventive Services Task Force. Systematic Review Methods. The Guide to Community Preventive Services - The Community Guide - What Works to Promote Health Web site. http://www.thecommunityguide.org/about/methods.html. Updated June 3, 2014.
  7. Fielding JE, Marks JS, Myers BW, Nolan PA, Rawson RD, Toomey KE. How do we translate science into public health policy and law? J Law Med Ethics. 2002;30(suppl 3):22-32.
  8. Guirguis-Blake J, Calonge N, Miller T, et al. Current processes of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: refining evidence-based recommendation development. Ann Intern Med. 2007;147(2):117-22.
  9. Jacobs JA, Jones E, Gabella BA, Spring B, Brownson RC. Tools for implementing an evidence-based approach in public health practice. Prev Chronic Dis. 2012;9:E116.
  10. Maciosek MV, Coffield AB, Edwards NM, Flottemesch TJ, Solberg LI. Prioritizing clinical preventive services: a review and framework with implications for community preventive services. Annu Rev Public Health. 2009;30:341-55.
  11. McGinnis JM, Foege W. Guide to Community Preventive Services: harnessing the science. Am J Prev Med. 2000;18(suppl 1):1-2.
  12. Myers BA. Getting people to want sliced bread--an update on dissemination of the Guide to Community Preventive Services. J Public Health Manag Pract. 2003;9(6):545-51.
  13. Ockene JK, Edgerton EA, Teutsch SM, et al. Integrating evidence-based clinical and community strategies to improve health. Am J Prev Med. 2007;32(3):244-52.
  14. Pappaioanou M, Evans C Jr. Development of the Guide to Community Preventive Services: a U.S. Public Health Service initiative. J Public Health Manag Pract. 1998;4(2):48-54.
  15. Truman BI, Smith-Akin CK, Hinman AR, et al. Developing the Guide to Community Preventive Services--overview and rationale. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services. Am J Prev Med. 2000;18(suppl 1):18-26.
  16. Woolf SH, DiGuiseppi CG, Atkins D, Kamerow DB. Developing evidence-based clinical practice guidelines: lessons learned by the US Preventive Services Task Force. Annu Rev Public Health. 1996;17:511-38.
  17. Zaza S, Lawrence RS, Mahan CS, et al. Scope and organization of the Guide to Community Preventive Services. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services. Am J Prev Med. 2000;18(suppl 1):27-34.
  18. Zaza S, Pickett JD. The Guide to Community Preventive Services: update on development and dissemination activities. J Public Health Manag Pract. 2001;7(1):92-4.
  19. Zaza S, Wright-De Agüero LK, Briss PA, et al. Data collection instrument and procedure for systematic reviews in the Guide to Community Preventive Services. Task Force on Community Preventive Services. Am J Prev Med. 2000;18(suppl 1):44-74.

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November 12, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CST, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar
Christina Davidson

Christina Davidson, MD, Professor, Baylor College of Medicine and Chief of Service, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ben Taub Hospital
2014-11-12-preventing-the-first

Preventing the First Cesarean Delivery: Practical Application of the Evidence
TRAIN Course ID:
1053601
Presenters: Christina Davidson, MD, Professor, Baylor College of Medicine and Chief of Service, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ben Taub Hospital
Description: During the session, participants will learn about trends in Cesarean delivery in Texas and the U.S. and the short and long-term consequences of Cesarean delivery for mother and infant. Through this examination, the participant will learn about the most common precursors to Cesarean delivery, cases when Cesarean delivery is clinically indicated and situations in which the use of oxytocin protocols may avert progression to delivery by Cesarean section. Participants will have an opportunity to examine promising models for care bundling being promoted in other states and considered in Texas.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians; and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents: coming soon
Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Obstetric care consensus no. 1: safe prevention of the primary cesarean delivery. Obstet Gynecol. 2014;123(3):693-711.
  2. Barber EL, Lundsberg LS, Belanger K, Pettker CM, Funai EF, Illuzzi JL. Indications contributing to the increasing cesarean delivery rate. Obstet Gynecol. 2011;118(1):29-38.
  3. Boyle A, Reddy UM, Landy HJ, Huang CC, Driggers RW, Laughon SK. Primary cesarean delivery in the United States. Obstet Gynecol. 2013;122(1):33-40.
  4. Branch DW, Silver RM. Managing the primary cesarean delivery rate. Clin Obstet Gynecol. 2012;55(4):946-60. 
  5. Brennan DJ, Murphy M, Robson MS, O'Herlihy C. The singleton, cephalic, nulliparous woman after 36 weeks of gestation: contribution to overall cesarean delivery rates. Obstet Gynecol. 2011;117(2, Pt 1):273-9.
  6. Dresang LT, Leeman L. Cesarean delivery. Prim Care. 2012;39(1):145-65.
  7. Haberman S, Saraf S, Zhang J, et al. Nonclinical parameters affecting primary cesarean rates in the United States. Am J Perinatol. 2014;31(3):213-22.
  8. Hankins GD, Clark SM, Munn MB. Cesarean section on request at 39 weeks: impact on shoulder dystocia, fetal trauma, neonatal encephalopathy, and intrauterine fetal demise. Semin Perinatol. 2006;30(5):276-87.
Presentations


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Last updated October 30, 2014