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    Grand Rounds contact:
    grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


    Continuing Education contact:
    ce.service@dshs.state.tx.us


    TRAIN Texas contact:
    txtrain@dshs.state.tx.us

Presentations

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Presentations
Spring 2014 Schedule

Spring 2014 Semester

The Spring 2014 semester of Grand Rounds began on April 2 and ended on May 14, 2014. All presentations were on Wednesdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Central Time in Austin (K-100 Lecture Hall at 1100 W. 49th Street, see map) or via webinar.

Please note: CE credit is only available for those attending the live event, not the recording.

Past Presentations

Questions? E-mail grandrounds@dshs.state.tx.us


April 2, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Beau Ances
Beau Ances, MD, PhD, MSc, Associate Professor, Departments of Neurology, Radiology, and Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, Saint Louis

 

Deana Simpson
Deana M. Simpson, RN, Chief Clinical Transformation Officer, St. John Providence Health System and Founder/Director CJD Insight

4-2-2014 Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) and the Importance of Infection Prevention
TRAIN Course ID: 
1049907
Presenters: Beau Ances, MD, PhD, MSc, Associate Professor, Departments of Neurology, Radiology, and Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, Saint Louis; Deana M. Simpson, RN, Chief Clinical Transformation Officer, St. John Providence Health System and Founder/Director CJD Insight
Description: Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a rare, fatal, neurodegenerative disorder belonging to a group of prion diseases also known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE).  CJD is an excellent case study of the importance of infection control. During this presentation Dr. Beau Ances, Departments of Neurology, Radiology, and Biomedical Engineering, Washington University and Ms. Deana Simpson, RN,  Chief Clinical Transformation Officer, Founder and Director of CJD Insight will review the various types of CJD, signs and symptoms, diagnostic tools, care considerations, infection prevention guidelines/measures, transmission risk and analysis of cases.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Baxter HC, Campbell GA, Whittaker AG, et al. Elimination of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy infectivity and decontamination of surgical instruments by using radio-frequency gas-plasma treatment. J Gen Virol. 2005;86(Pt 8):2393-9.
  2. Belay ED1, Blase J, M Sehulster L, A Maddox R, B Schonberger L. Management of neurosurgical instruments and patients exposed to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2013;34(12):1272-80.
  3. Bucelli RC, Ances BM. Diagnosis and evaluation of a patient with rapidly progressive dementia. Mo Med. 2013;110(5):422-8.
  4. Carswell C, Thompson A, Lukic A, et al. MRI findings are often missed in the diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. BMC Neurol. 2012;12:153.
  5. Frampton, L. Calls to tackle protein risk. The Clinical Services Journal. 2014 Jan;51-53.
  6. Geschwind MD, Kuo AL, Wong KS, et al. Quinacrine treatment trial for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Neurology. 2013;81(23):2015-23.
  7. Haider E, Wali W, Raja S, Tariq M. Creutzfeldt Jakob disease. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2013;23(4):295-7.
  8. Haïk S, Marcon G, Mallet A, et al. Doxycycline in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a phase 2, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet Neurol. 2014;13(2):150-8.
  9. Newman PK1, Todd NV, Scoones D, et al. Postmortem findings in a case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease treated with intraventricular pentosan polysulfate [published online ahead of print February 19, 2014]. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. doi: 10.1136/jnnp-2013-305590
  10. Paterson RW, Takada LT, Geschwind MD. Diagnosis and treatment of rapidly progressive dementias. Neurol Clin Pract. 2012;2(3):187-200.
  11. Saba R, Booth SA. The genetics of susceptibility to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Public Health Genomics. 2013;16(1-2):17-24.
  12. Secker TJ, Hervé R, Zhao Q, Borisenko KB, Abel EW, Keevil CW. Doped diamond-like carbon coatings for surgical instruments reduce protein and prion-amyloid biofouling and improve subsequent cleaning. Biofouling. 2012;28(6):563-9.
  13. Szucs A, Várallyay P, Osztie E, et al. Clinical experiences with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: three case studies. Ideggyogy Sz. 2012;65(11-12):401-10.
  14. Wang LH, Bucelli RC, Patrick E, et al. Role of magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid, and electroencephalogram in diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. J Neurol. 2013;260(2):498-506.

April 9, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar
Avrim Fishkind
Dr. Avrim Fishkind, president and CEO of JSA Health Telepsychiatry and past president of the American Association of Emergency Psychiatry

4-9-2014 Telepsychiatry

Telepsychiatry: Breaking Barriers
TRAIN Course ID:
1049936
Presenter: Dr. Avrim Fishkind, president and CEO of JSA Health Telepsychiatry and past president of the American Association of Emergency Psychiatry
Description: Advances in secure communications technologies, combined with a national shortage of mental health professionals has energized the use of telepsychiatry. The widespread adoption of tablet computers, smartphones and secure two-way video communications systems has made e-therapy an attractive option for patients. Still, obstacles remain, including reimbursement methods and clinician licensing and credentialing across states and health systems. Affordable technology means that health systems, police and fire departments and case managers can connect on-call trained mental health professionals with patients anywhere, and at all hours. Please join Dr. Avrim Fishkind, president and CEO of JSA Health Telepsychiatry and past president of the American Association of Emergency Psychiatry for a closer look at this exciting application of telemedicine.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Licensed Professional Counselors; Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Clarke G, Yarborough BJ. Evaluating the promise of health IT to enhance/expand the reach of mental health services. Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2013;35(4):339-44.
  2. Detweiler MB, Arif S, Candelario J, et al. A telepsychiatry transition clinic: the first 12 months experience. J Telemed Telecare. 2011;17(6):293-7.
  3. Dzara K, Sarver J, Bennett JI, Basnet P. Resident and medical student viewpoints on their participation in a telepsychiatry rotation. Acad Psychiatry. 2013;37(3):214-6.
  4. Jacob MK, Larson JC, Craighead WE. Establishing a telepsychiatry consultation practice in rural Georgia for primary care physicians: a feasibility report. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2012;51(11):1041-7.
  5. Lau ME, Way BB, Fremont WP. Assessment of Suny Upstate Medical University's child telepsychiatry consultation program.
  6. Meltzer B. Telemedicine in emergency psychiatry. Psychiatr Serv. 1997 Sep;48(9):1141-2.
  7. Merrell RC, Doarn CR. Tales of telemedicine--telepsychiatry at work. Telemed J E Health. 2013;19(4):233-4.
  8. Shore JH. Telepsychiatry: videoconferencing in the delivery of psychiatric care. Am J Psychiatry. 2013;170(3):256-62.
  9. Shore JH, Hilty DM, Yellowlees P. Emergency management guidelines for telepsychiatry. Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2007;29(3):199-206.
  10. Thara R. Using mobile telepsychiatry to close the mental health gap. Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2012;14(3):167-8.
  11. Wynn R, Bergvik S, Pettersen G, Fossum S. Clinicians' experiences with videoconferencing in psychiatry. Stud Health Technol Inform. 2012;180:1218-20.
  12. Yellowlees P, Burke MM, Marks SL, Hilty DM, Shore JH. Emergency telepsychiatry. J Telemed Telecare. 2008;14(6):277-81.

April 16, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Michelle Malizia
Michelle Malizia, MA, Associate Director, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library

4-16-2014 Friends Followers and Retweets

Friends, Followers and Retweets: The Impact of Social Media on Patients and Providers
TRAIN Course ID:
1049959
Presenter: Michelle Malizia, MA, Associate Director, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, South Central Region, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library
Description: Over 70% of online adults use at least one social networking site, such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn or Pinterest. While many organizations are slow to adopt these new technologies, social networking will play an important role in health and wellness in the future. How can social media be used to improve healthcare? This presentation will examine a variety of social media platforms and describe how they are currently used by health departments, individual providers and patients themselves. Additionally, information on the importance of developing and implementing a social media policy will be provided.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, and Licensed Professional Counselors; Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists; certificate of attendance. 
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Ackerman MJ. Privacy, M-health, and social media. J Med Pract Manage. 2013;28(4):264-5.
  2. Chretien KC, Kind T. Social media and clinical care: ethical, professional, and social implications. Circulation. 2013 Apr 2;127(13):1413-21.
  3. Gay S1, Pho K. Online reputation management: the first steps. J Med Pract Manage. 2013;29(2):81-3.
  4. Koh S, Cattell GM, Cochran DM, Krasner A, Langheim FJ, Sasso DA. Psychiatrists' use of electronic communication and social media and a proposed framework for future guidelines. J Psychiatr Pract. 2013;19(3):254-63.
  5. Lachman VD. Social media: managing the ethical issues. Medsurg Nurs. 2013;22(5):326-9.
  6. McKee R. Ethical issues in using social media for health and health care research. Health Policy. 2013;110(2-3):298-301.
  7. Moorhead SA, Hazlett DE, Harrison L, Carroll JK, Irwin A, Hoving C. A new dimension of health care: systematic review of the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media for health communication. J Med Internet Res. 2013;15(4):e85.
  8. Piscotty R, Voepel-Lewis T, Lee SH, Annis-Emeott A, Lee E, Kalisch B. To tweet or not to tweet? Nurses, social media, and patient care. Nurs Manage. 2013;44(5):52-3.
  9. Suby C. Social media in health care: benefits, concerns, and guidelines for use. Creat Nurs. 2013;19(3):140-7.
  10. Verkamp J. Patient loyalty and the social media effect. J Med Pract Manage. 2013;29(2):96-8.
  11. Waxer N, Ninan D, Ma A, Dominguez N. How cloud computing and social media are changing the face of health care. Physician Exec. 2013;39(2):58-60, 62.

April 23, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar
Jeffrey Higginbotham
Jeffrey Higginbotham, MD, Pain Management Specialist

4-23-2014 Pain Management Evidence Based

Pain Management: Evidence Based Strategies
TRAIN Course ID:
1049962
Presenter: Jeffrey Higginbotham, MD, Pain Management Specialist
Description: Chronic pain is increasingly being recognized as a global health issue with widespread prevalence and a large economic burden on society.  More recently, pain management specialists have emerged to coordinate care and reduce suffering of affected individuals.  In this presentation, Dr. Jeffrey Higginbotham, MD, will review the history and epidemiology, current multidisciplinary strategies and the effects of the prescription drug epidemic on the care of the chronic pain patient.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Bhatia A, Brull R. Review article: is ultrasound guidance advantageous for interventional pain management? A systematic review of chronic pain outcomes. Anesth Analg. 2013;117(1):236-51.
  2. Blau WS. The needle in a haystack: appropriate use of interventional techniques in the management of chronic pain. N C Med J. 2013;74(3):215-7.
  3. Eccleston C, Morley SJ, Williams AC. Psychological approaches to chronic pain management: evidence and challenges. Br J Anaesth. 2013;111(1):59-63.
  4. Finch JW. Challenges of chronic pain management: public health consequences and considered responses. N C Med J. 2013;74(3):243-5, 247-8.
  5. Iadarola MJ, Gonnella LG. Resiniferatoxin for pain treatment: An interventional approach to personalized pain medicine. The Open Pain Journal. 2013;6(Suppl 1: M10)95-107.
  6. Keefe FJ, Porter L, Somers T, Shelby R, Wren AV. Psychosocial interventions for managing pain in older adults: outcomes and clinical implications. Br J Anaesth. 2013;111(1):89-94.
  7. Mathias B, Parry-Jones B, Huws JC. Individual experiences of an acceptance-based pain management programme: an interpretative phenomenological analysis. Psychol Health. 2014;29(3):279-96.
  8. Reisman SE. Medicinal chemistry: New lead for pain treatment. Nature. 2011;473: 458–459.
  9. Savage SR. What to do when pain and addiction coexist. J Fam Pract. 2013;62(6 Suppl):S10-6.
  10. Schofield P. Managing chronic pain in older people. Nurs Times. 2013;109(30):26-7.
  11. Sellek S. Opioid use on the rise: is the pen mightier than the alternatives when it comes to chronic pain management? Mich Med. 2013;112(4):8-10.
  12. Shen H. Deadly snake venom delivers pain relief. Nature. 2014. doi:10.1038/nature.2012.11526 
  13. Verdon DR, Bendix J, Zimlich R. The price of pain. Physicians cite need for better communication to successfully treat pain and monitor for possible abuse. Med Econ. 2013;90(5):30, 32, 39.
  14. Vos T, Flaxman AD, Naghavi M, et al. Years lived with disability (YLDs) for 1160 sequelae of 289 diseases and injuries 1990–2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. Lancet. 2013;381(9867):628.

April 30, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Jackee Kayser
Jackee Kayser, MD, Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas

Roberto Rodriguez
Roberto Rodriguez, MD, MPH, Texas Department of State Health Services

4-30-2014 Allergies and Asthma

Allergies and Asthma: Epidemiology, Causes and Treatments
TRAIN Course ID:
1050358
Presenters: Jackee Kayser, MD, Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas; Roberto Rodriguez, MD, MPH, Texas Department of State Health Services
Description: The occurrence of allergic disease is skyrocketing, and some estimates are that as many as one-in-five Americans have an allergic condition. Millions of people suffer from allergies caused by exposures to triggers such as pollens, dust mites and cat dander.  Agents encountered by children and adults can cause allergic problems such as nasal and sinus allergies, hives, asthma and even severe anaphylactic reactions. Asthma is one of the more serious problems that caused by allergies resulting in recurrent attacks of symptoms such as wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing.  Please join Jackee  Kayser, MD, Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas and Roberto Rodriguez, MD, MPH, Texas Department of State Health Services to learn more about the epidemiology and treatment options for allergies and asthma.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Batra PS, Tong L, Citardi MJ. Analysis of comorbidities and objective parameters in refractory chronic rhinosinusitis. Laryngoscope. 2013;123 Suppl 7:S1-11.
  2. Cabana MD, Kunselman SJ, Nyenhuis SM, Wechsler ME. Researching asthma across the ages: insights from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Asthma Network.  J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2014;133(1):27-33.
  3. Calderón MA, Casale T, Cox L, et al. Allergen immunotherapy: a new semantic framework from the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology/American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology/PRACTALL consensus report. Allergy. 2013;68(7):825-8.
  4. Chang LH1, Rivera MP. Respiratory diseases: meeting the challenges of screening, prevention, and treatment. N C Med J. 2013;74(5):385-92.
  5. Halawi AM, Smith SS, Chandra RK. Chronic rhinosinusitis: epidemiology and cost. Allergy Asthma Proc. 2013;34(4):328-34.
  6. Hurt L, Pinto CD, Watson J, Grant M, Gielner J; Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center.  Diagnosis and screening for obesity-related conditions among children and teens receiving medicaid - Maryland, 2005-2010.  MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2014 Apr 11;63(14):305-8.
  7. Iqbal S1, Oraka E, Chew GL, Flanders WD. Association between birthplace and current asthma: the role of environment and acculturation. Am J Public Health. 2014;104 Suppl 1:S175-82.
  8. Lieberman PL. Recognition and first-line treatment of anaphylaxis. Am J Med. 2014;127(1 Suppl):S6-11.
  9. Malcarney MB, Seiler N, Horton K. Using insurance laws to improve access to community-based asthma prevention. Public Health Rep. 2013;128(5):402-6.
  10. Martinez FD, Wright AL, Taussig LM, et al. Asthma and wheezing in the first six years of life. The Group Health Medical Associates. N Engl J Med 1995; 332:133
  11. Minutelli DR. The importance of increased asthma education. Am J Public Health. 2013;103(10):e1.
  12. Okelo SO, Butz AM, Sharma R, et al. Interventions to modify health care provider adherence to asthma guidelines: a systematic review. Pediatrics. 2013;132(3):517-34.
  13. Ratnapradipa D, Robins AG, Ratnapradipa K. Preschool children's environmental exposures: a case-control epidemiological study of the presence of asthma-like symptoms. J Environ Health. 2013;76(4):12-7.
  14. Sclar DA, Lieberman PL. Anaphylaxis: underdiagnosed, underreported, and undertreated. Am J Med. 2014;127(1 Suppl):S1-5.
  15. Silverberg JI1, Hanifin JM. Adult eczema prevalence and associations with asthma and other health and demographic factors: a US population-based study. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2013;132(5):1132-8.
  16. Zhang X1, Morrison-Carpenter T, Holt JB, Callahan DB. Trends in adult current asthma prevalence and contributing risk factors in the United States by state: 2000-2009. BMC Public Health. 2013 Dec 10;13:1156.

May 7, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

James Lukefahr
James L. Lukefahr, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio

5-7-2014 Child Abuse and Neglect

Child Abuse and Neglect: The Science, Myths, and Reality
TRAIN Course ID:
1050398
Presenter: James L. Lukefahr, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio
Description: About 2,000 children die each year as a result of abuse or neglect. 85% are under age 5, and almost half are under age 1. Over 405 die due to neglect, 22% die from physical abuse, and 31% die from multiple causes. At least 1/3 die as a result of inflicted head trauma. Inflicted head trauma is the most common manner of death from abuse under age 1, and is also the most common type of fatal head trauma in this age group. Child abuse is synonymous with violence against children, and most perpetrators of this violence are family members.  Identifying child abuse and neglect and offering help to victims remain major challenges for health and human service professionals. Please join Dr. James Lukefahr, UT Health Science Center San Antonio for an intriguing discussion of the science, myths, and realities of child abuse.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Licensed Professional Counselors; Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists  (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, and certificate of attendance. Ethics credit will be awarded.
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Adams JA, Starling SP, Frasier LD, et al. Diagnostic accuracy in child sexual abuse medical evaluation: role of experience, training, and expert case review. Child Abuse Negl. 2012;36(5):383-92.
  2. Banaschak S, Rothschild MA, Roth B, Eifinger F. Near fatal physical neglect in a newborn with a three-year follow-up. Klin Padiatr. 2012;224(5):320-1.
  3. Hobbs CJ. Physical evidence of child sexual abuse. Eur J Pediatr. 2012;171(5):751-5.
  4. Hornor G. Child maltreatment: screening and anticipatory guidance. J Pediatr Health Care. 2013 Jul-Aug;27(4):242-50.
  5. Jenny C, Crawford-Jakubiak JE, Committee on Child Abuse and Neglect, American Academy of Pediatrics. The evaluation of children in the primary care setting when sexual abuse is suspected. Pediatrics. 2013;132(2):e558-67.
  6. Knox M, Pelletier H, Vieth V. Educating medical students about adolescent maltreatment. Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2013;25(3):301-8.
  7. Kodner C, Wetherton A. Diagnosis and management of physical abuse in children. Am Fam Physician. 2013;88(10):669-75.
  8. Lane W, Bair-Merritt MH, Dubowitz H. Child abuse and neglect. Scand J Surg. 2011;100(4):264-72.
  9. Larimer EL1, Fallon SC, Westfall J, Frost M, Wesson DE, Naik-Mathuria BJ. The importance of surgeon involvement in the evaluation of non-accidental trauma patients. J Pediatr Surg. 2013;48(6):1357-62.
  10. Maguire S, Mann M. Systematic reviews of bruising in relation to child abuse-what have we learnt: an overview of review updates. Evid Based Child Health. 2013;8(2):255-63.
  11. Oates K. Medical dimensions of child abuse and neglect. Child Abuse Negl. 2013;37(7):427-9.
  12. Oates RK. Role of the medical community in detecting and managing child abuse. Med J Aust. 2014;200(1):7-8.
  13. Piteau SJ, Ward MG, Barrowman NJ, Plint AC. Clinical and radiographic characteristics associated with abusive and nonabusive head trauma: a systematic review. Pediatrics. 2012;130(2):315-23.
  14. Tilak GS, Pollock AN. Missed opportunities in fatal child abuse. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2013;29(5):685-7.

May 14, 2014, 11:00-12:30pm CDT, K-100 Lecture Hall in Austin or via webinar

Lisa Hollier
Lisa M. Hollier, MD, MPH, Medical Director, Obstetrics, Texas Children’s Health Plan

Dorothy Mandell
Dorothy Mandell, PhD, Texas Department of State Health Services

5-14-2014 Texas Healthy Babies

Healthy Texas Babies: Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review
TRAIN Course ID:
1050388
Presenters: Lisa M. Hollier, MD, MPH, Medical Director, Obstetrics, Texas Children’s Health Plan; Dorothy Mandell, PhD, Texas Department of State Health Services
Description: Maternal mortality is often used as a measure of health and well-being among women across the globe. The maternal mortality rate in the U.S. has nearly doubled in a decade and is higher than in 40 other industrialized countries.  In Texas, the maternal mortality rate increased from 13.7 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2007, to 24.4 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2011. The maternal mortality rate for African American women is 2-3 times higher than for Caucasian women—one of the most striking disparities in women’s health outcomes.  During this session, participants will learn about the steps Texas has taken to establish a maternal mortality and morbidity task force to review cases of maternal death and severe morbidity in our state. The session will examine the magnitude of the problem of maternal death and severe morbidity in Texas and nationally, discuss the purpose of the task force, and highlight the successes existing maternal mortality reviews in other states have experienced.
Continuing Education Credit Hours Type: 1.5 contact hours for Continuing Medical Education (CME); Continuing Nursing Education (CNE); Social Workers; Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master-Certified Health Education Specialists (M-CHES); Registered Sanitarians, and certificate of attendance.
Presentation documents:

Suggested resources: To request a full-text copy of any of the articles below, please e-mail library@dshs.state.tx.us.

  1. Berg CJ. From identification and review to action--maternal mortality review in the United States. Semin Perinatol. 2012;36(1):7-13.
  2. Brown H, Small M. The role of the maternal-fetal medicine subspecialist in review and prevention of maternal deaths. Semin Perinatol. 2012;36(1):27-30.
  3. Burch D, Noell D, Hill WC, Delke I. Pregnancy-associated mortality review: the Florida experience. Semin Perinatol. 2012;36(1):31-6.
  4. Callaghan WM. Overview of maternal mortality in the United States. Semin Perinatol. 2012;36(1):2-6.
  5. Clark SL. Strategies for reducing maternal mortality. Semin Perinatol. 2012;36(1):42-7.
  6. Creanga AA, Berg CJ, Ko JY, et al. Maternal mortality and morbidity in the United States: where are we now? J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2014;23(1):3-9.
  7. King JC. Maternal mortality in the United States--why is it important and what are we doing about it? Semin Perinatol. 2012;36(1):14-8.
  8. Main EK. Decisions required for operating a maternal mortality review committee: the California experience. Semin Perinatol. 2012;36(1):37-41.
  9. Say L, Souza JP, Pattinson RC, et al. Maternal near miss--towards a standard tool for monitoring quality of maternal health care. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2009;23(3):287-96.
   

 

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Last updated May 14, 2014